Oct 31

2012 Mets Player Review: Bobby Parnell

BOBBY PARNELL, RHP

PRESEASON EXPECTATIONS: Actually, considering his new role entering spring training, the expectations of Bobby Parnell – he of the fastball of 100 mph. – were minimal. Parnell could not seize the closer, set-up and even starter roles when given the opportunity in previous seasons, so the Mets dropped him to the seventh inning in the wake of signing Jon Rauch (set-up) and Frank Francisco (closer) from Toronto in the offseason. Parnell has exceptional stuff capable of three figures on his fastball, but hasn’t consistently commanded his secondary pitches or been able to challenge hitters with his location and pitch selection. In addition, that overpowering fastball often didn’t have movement and looked like it was on a tee. Anybody’s fastball can be hit if there’s no lateral or dip movement. So, knowing his inconsistencies, despite his potential, the Mets penciled Parnell in for the seventh inning role.

2012 SEASON REVIEW: Parnell struggled early as five of eight inherited runners scored against him in April. However, Parnell righted himself and only four more out of 20 scored the rest of the season. When Rauch hit the skids and Francisco was injured and erratic, Parnell inherited their roles and was exceptional. Parnell was 1-1 with two holds and three saves (no blown saves) in September, and went 2-1 with a save in August. Parnell still had his fastball, but his sinker and command was much better as the season progressed. Parnell finished at 5-4 with a 2.49 ERA and 1.23 WHIP. Parnell had streaks of wildness in the past, but last season walked only 20 in 68.2 innings pitched. He also struck out 61 and batters hit .249 off him with a .303 on-base percentage. The batting and on-base averages were career bests.

LOOKING AT 2013: Parnell made $504,000 last season, and should be offered arbitration for 2013. With Rauch not expected back and Francisco another year remaining on his contract to close, expect Parnell to be slotted into the eighth-inning set-up role, or close if Francisco isn’t physically able. The Mets have given up on Parnell as a potential starter and now figure him as their closer-of-the-future – again. It takes some pitchers longer than others to reach their potential and Parnell had been erratic since 2008 until the end of last season. The Mets’ bullpen unraveled late last year with the exception of Parnell and Manny Acosta late. I don’t know if Parnell will ever fulfill his long-range expectations, but for the first time in several years the Mets aren’t pulling their hair out over him. That has to be a plus, right?

Oct 30

Mets Matters: Team To Pick Up Options For David Wright And R.A. Dickey This Week

The Mets have yet to open negotiations with either David Wright or R.A. Dickey, so the published report of a $100 million package for Wright is premature.

One internet outlet claims the Mets have the $100 million offer on the table, but that isn’t true as much as it is conjecture for a reasonable starting spot.

All options for the 2013 season must be exercised industry-wide within five days of the end of the World Series. The NFL trade deadline this week was extended because of Hurricane Sandy, but I have not heard of any extensions for Major League Baseball, so I am figuring they are remaining the same.

So, expect the Mets to pick up Wright’s $16 million option and Dickey’s $5 million option for 2013. Both are no-brainers and will allow the Mets time to work out the appropriate extensions. GM Sandy Alderson said his goal is to finalize both this offseason.

According to Wright’s contract, the Mets have until tomorrow, or three days from the end of the World Series, to pick up the option.

Neither Wright nor Dickey want to negotiate during the 2013 season, and both expressed their willingness to re-sign with the Mets is contingent on the seriousness of the team to build around them. That, presumably, means if the Mets are able to sign the other.

MEJIA HIT: Jenrry Mejia, who prefers starting to the bullpen, gave up three runs on three hits and two walks in 2.1 innings in a start for the Dominican Republic against Escogido in his first winter-ball appearance.

The Mets have not decided what role is best suited for Mejia, but last year’s numbers indicate better success starting than coming out of the pen.

As of now, assuming all their ducks line up, the Mets don’t have room for Mejia in their 2013 rotation, but do have room for him in their bullpen.

MANUEL UP FOR COLORADO JOB:  Former Mets’ manager Jerry Manuel, who arguably set back Mejia’s career by insisting he work out of the bullpen in 2012 when he was clearly not ready, interviewed for the vacant managerial job with the Colorado Rockies.

Manuel was 204-213 for the Mets from midway through the 208 season through 2010, which considering the team’s lack of pitching in that span, isn’t too bad.

Another former Mets coach, Rick Peterson, is interviewing for Boston’s pitching coach job. Considering head case Josh Beckett is gone, Peterson will have a fighting chance if he gets the job.

WRIGHT GOLD GLOVE CANDIDATE: Wright is the favorite to win the National League’s Gold Glove Award, which is to be announced tonight.

 

Oct 30

2012 Mets Player Review: Situational Right-handers Manny Acosta And Ramon Ramirez

 MANNY ACOSTA, RHP

PRESEASON EXPECTATIONS: Mets GM Sandy Alderson’s priority last winter was bolstering his bullpen, something by his own admission he wasn’t able to do. Building a bullpen entails a closer, set-up man, situational relievers, and if luxury provides, a long man. The Mets were woefully thin in most of those areas and entered the season hoping for something from Manny Acosta, who gave them 44 appearances in 2011, and Ramon Ramirez, who came to the Mets with Andres Torres in the Angel Pagan trade. Both are situational right-handers expected to be the bridge to the set-up relievers and closer. Acosta throws a fastball in the mid-90s and decent curve. He averages a strikeout an inning, which is the kind of pitcher you want in a jam with runners on and a tough right-handed hitter such as Mike Zimmerman or Matt Holliday coming to the plate. However, like a lot of pitchers with a power arm, Acosta is prone to streaks of wildness. Acosta’s career has not been one of consistency, so there was a bad-Acosta the Mets knew was possible. As for Ramirez, he also has a plus fastball. Ramirez logged 68.2 innings in 66 games for the 2011 Giants, so the Mets knew they were getting a workhorse. They also knew they weren’t getting a dominant reliever.

2012 SEASON REVIEW: The Mets received pretty much what they expected from Acosta and Ramirez. They got the innings they needed, although they weren’t necessarily quality innings. Acosta started so slowly that he was optioned to Triple-A Buffalo as the result of a gagging 11.86 ERA over his first 19 appearances. Acosta worked out his mechanical issues in the minors concerning his release point and in the second half batters only hit .148 off him and he cut his ERA down by almost half. Ramirez threw 63.2 innings in 58 appearances, and wasn’t effective as he put on 93 runners in that span. He only struck out 52, so we’re not talking a power arm. The Mets’ bullpen was woefully inadequate this summer and these two were a part of the problem.

LOOKING AT 2013: Of the two, Acosta is the one most likely to return next summer. Acosta made $875,000 last season and is eligible for salary arbitration. Considering how strong Acosta was at the end, they could offer arbitration and still take the hit if they were to lose the case. Ramirez made $2.65 million in 2012 and will become a free agent. He did not have the season worthy of bringing him back and can find comparable production at a lower cost elsewhere.

Oct 29

Be Safe During Hurricane Sandy

Just taking a break from working on a post on the Mets’ bullpen to wish you all the best over the next few days as we’ll be pummeled by Hurricane Sandy. Watching the Weather Channel and this will be a nasty one.

The Tri-State area will be a mess this week and it is anybody’s guess as to how long many of us will be without power. I’ll be busy for the next few hours working on some projects in anticipation of losing power and Internet access. If the power goes down I can go on battery for a few hours, but will lose my Wi-Fi and cable, thereby, the ability to post. So, if you notice a gap in posting you’ll know why.

I will attempt to post as many of those projects as possible with the thought I won’t be able to tonight or tomorrow.

The most important thing is for you all be be safe in your homes. Be safe my friends. John

Oct 29

2012 Mets Player Review: Situational Lefties Josh Edgin And Robert Carson

 JOSH EDGIN, LHP

PRESEASON EXPECTATIONS: The San Francisco Giants are World Series champions this morning in large part because of their bullpen, which included situational lefties Jeremy Affeldt, Javier Lopez and Jose Mijares. The team they defeated, Detroit, had Phil Coke in that role. Most of the playoff teams had dependable lefthanded relievers. When the Mets went to spring training, a situational lefthander was a huge void they expected only Tim Byrdak to fill, which put them at a disadvantage. Byrdak bounced around with Kansas City, Baltimore, Detroit and Houston before finding a home with the Mets in 2011, when he appeared in 72 games and struck out 47 hitters in 37.2 innings. Meanwhile, other lefties in the Mets’ system, Josh Edgin and Robert Carson, were simply blips on their radar. Perhaps they’d get called up in an emergency or in September. Either way, neither was counted on for this season.

WHAT THEY GOT:  By his own admission, manager Terry Collins said he overworked Byrdak, who, like Pedro Feliciano before him, landed on the disabled list with arm problems. Byrdak appeared in 56 games and threw 30.2 innings. A reliever’s workload is more than innings, it is appearances, and with each appearance comes one or two times warming up in the bullpen. The Mets monitor warm-up pitches in the bullpen and knew Byrdak approached a dangerous limit. Eventually, those pitches took a toll and Byrdak was burned out. The strain was more magnified because he was the only lefthander. The Mets eventually replaced him with Carson and Edgin, both of whom performed well in spots. Edgin threw 25.2 innings in 34 games, and allowed seven of 23 inherited runners to score, a number that needs improvement. Carson has outstanding stuff, evidenced by a Sept. 12 appearance at Washington when he inherited a bases loaded-no outs situation an escaped unscathed. They lost that game, but it was arguably the Mets’ best appearance by a reliever all season. Only one of Carson’s six inherited runners scored.

LOOKING AT 2013: Admittedly, the windows of performance from Edgin and Carson are small, but both are inexpensive options for next season. As the Giants proved, having more than one lefty specialist is essential. The Mets abused Feliciano and Byrdak because they had nobody else, but having two will ease the burden, especially because they seem safe in the eighth and ninth innings with Bobby Parnell and Frank Francisco. Both will likely go into spring training with a spot on the staff. It has been a long time since the Mets had two dependable lefty relievers on the same staff.