Jul 12

Today in Mets’ History: Mets in the All-Star Game.

On this date in 1966, in the stifling 100-degree temperature at St. Louis’ Busch Stadium, the National League prevailed, 2-1, in ten innings.

Tim McCarver led off the inning against Pete Richert with a single to right and was sacrificed to second by Ron Hunt. Maury Wills then singled home the game-winning run.

In the 1988 game at Cincinnati’s Riverfront Stadium, David Cone pitched a 1-2-3 inning and Gary Carter and Darryl Strawberry had hits in the National League’s 2-1 loss.

Dwight Gooden started for the National League that day and gave up a run in three innings and took the loss.

Jul 11

Today in Mets’ History: Seaver gets save in 1967 game.

Tom Seaver starred on this date in 1967 at the All-Star Game in Anaheim when All-Star Games actually meant something and were more than an encore for ESPN’s Home Run Derby.

SEAVER: Gets save in 67 game.

 

As a rookie, Seaver threw a hitless 15th inning to earn the save in the National League’s 2-1 victory. Seaver’s Hall of Fame career included 12 All-Star selections.

An oddity about this game was in that all the runs came on solo homers from third basemen: Philadelphia’s Richie Allen, Baltimore’s Brooks Robinson and Cincinnati’s Tony Perez.

This was a time when the starting pitchers worked at their three innings and there were pitchers available for extra innings. Unlike the disaster game in Milwaukee several years back when Commissioner Bud Selig called it a tie because the teams ran out of pitchers.

In this game, Seaver’s one inning was the shortest stint of the night as all the other pitchers worked at least two innings, with five pitching at least three innings, and Catfish Hunter throwing five as he took the loss. Don Drysdale was the winning pitcher.

BOX SCORE

 

UP NEXT: How spring training issues have been addressed in the first half.


 

Jul 10

Today in Mets’ History: Matlack throws one-hitter.

On this date in 1973, the Mets’ Jon Matlack threw a one-hit shutout at Shea Stadium over the Houston Astros, 1-0.

Tommy Helms doubled in the sixth for Houston’s only hit, and Duffy Dyer’s double drove in Rusty Staub for the game’s only run.

With the victory, the Mets improved to 36-46, sixth place in the National League East, 12 games off the pace.

It was a different time then, but the message is the same. Those Mets didn’t give up on the season and reached the World Series. The road is different today, but looking  back history tells us good things can still happen in this season.

BOX SCORE

 

Jul 09

Today in Mets’ History: Always terrific, Seaver was nearly perfect.

It is possible this game in 1969 is most remembered from that amazing season. On this date in 1969, and maybe each day since for Tom Seaver, he’ll remember Jimmy Qualls’ sinking single into the left-center gap with one out in the eighth inning to break up his perfect game bid and forced him to settle for one-hit, 4-0 shutout.

SEAVER: Almost perfect on this day.

It was one of 31 hits Qualls had during his career. It was one of five one-hitters Seaver threw for the Mets. Years later, Seaver got his no-hitter, but it was while pitching for Cincinnati.

When asked which meant more to him, the one-hitter or the no-hitter, Seaver said: “The one-hitter.  I had better stuff that night and we were making a move on the Cubs.’’

BOX SCORE

Seaver’s game thrust the Mets into the national spotlight as a contender. I was living in Ohio at the time and rarely did the 11 p.m., sports feature clips from games other than the Indians, but they did on this night.

I always followed the box scores then, but after that game I started following them a little more closely.

 

Jul 08

Mets at Giants to close first half

After their strong showing in Los Angeles, the Mets attempt to close out their surprising first half in San Francisco, with R.A. Dickey going against Ryan Vogelsong.

A reoccurring story line to the Mets’ first half has been whether they will deal All-Star shortstop, Jose Reyes, who was placed on the disabled list with a pulled hamstring.

General manager Sandy Alderson said it is unlikely Reyes would be traded, and the team is interested in signing him to an extension this winter.

Reyes said his camp wants to negotiate after the season, and the Mets have not made an offer.

The Mets are now saying it could take longer than two weeks for Reyes’ hamstring to heal, which isn’t surprising considering his history with muscle pulls, first early in his career, and recently with his strained oblique. This is not an athlete with quick recuperative powers.

In the interim, the Mets are getting a good look at Ruben Tejada, who is proving not to be an easy out.

Here’s tonight’s lineup:

Angel Pagan, CF

Justin Turner, 2B

Carlos Beltran, RF

Daniel Murphy, 3B

Jason Bay, LF

Lucas Duda, 1B

Josh Thole, C

Ruben Tejada, SS

RA Dickey, RP