Apr 14

Wright In Lineup Today

David Wright gave it a go and will be in the lineup this afternoon at Philadelphia. For five days Terry Collins expressed optimism Wright would be able to play, but also admitted the DL was a possibility.

There is a risk to Wright playing today, which is if Wright aggravates the injury and does go on the DL the Mets would have lost five days in the process.

If his pinkie feels better today, it would probably improve over the next couple of days. I believe the Mets are taking a risk.

Here’s today’s lineup:

Ruben Tejada, ss

Daniel Murphy, 2b

David Wright, 3b
Ike Davis, 1b
Jason Bay, lf
Lucas Duda, rf
Kirk Nieuwenhuis, cf
Josh Thole, c
Jon Niese, lhp
Apr 14

R.A. Dickey Pitches Big With Mets At Precarious Time

After two ugly losses, David Wright headed for the DL and the team headed for Philadelphia then Atlanta, the Mets are at a precarious time in the young season. Sometimes I can be glass half empty guy, but these are the Mets and you’ve seen it happen, too.

DICKEY: Pitches big when Mets needed him most.

With Cliff Lee dealing for the Phillies, I envisioned the worst last night, even after – surprise, surprise – Jason Bay homered in the first. But, R.A. Dickey came up with his 14th straight quality start.

Whether last night gets the Mets going again or delays the inevitable remains to be seen, but it was fun to watch.

As far as Bay goes, I’m reading anything into the homer. Even a blind squirrel finds a nut now and then.

Bay did say this is a “big time” for him, and he’s right. He’s been a bust so far, and even should he have two big seasons, is that enough to salvage the contract?

I’m not sure it does, but if he has a good season in could make the last year more palatable and possibly make him easier to move. Have to keep a positive thought, right?

 

 

 

Apr 13

Wright Not In Line-up Tonight At Philly

On second thought, the Mets opted for caution and decided not to play David Wright after all. That seemed like the prudent decision. The season is young so there’s no sense to push things. I would serve no purpose.

Here’s tonight’s line-up:

Ruben Tejada, ss

Daniel Murphy, 2b

Justin Turner, 3b

Ike Davis, 1b

Jason Bay, lf

Scott Hairston, cf

Josh Thole, c

R.A. Dickey, rp

LINE-UP THOUGHTS: Thole didn’t have a good day behind the plate the other day. I was thinking Mike Nickeas would get to catch the knuckleballer.

Apr 13

Do The Mets Have A Rivalry With Any Team?

With the Mets in Philadelphia over the weekend, I can’t help but wonder if they have a rivalry with any team. I mean a serious, hate-their-guts rivalry. They definitely don’t have anything with the spice of Yankees-Red Sox.

For two seasons, at least, they had something with the Phillies, and in 2007 and 2008 they kicked away the NL East on the final weekend. Jimmy Rollins was right when he said the Phillies were the team to beat.

But, for 50 years, Mets-Phillies was mostly ho-hum, despite the closeness of the two cities. Geography is only a small factor for it, but it can’t be the sole essence of an intense rivalry. That’s why Mets-Yankees, to me, doesn’t make it, either. So what that they play in the same city. The bottom line is the two teams aren’t competing for the same thing. That, in large part is why interleague play doesn’t cut it.

The Mets and Phillies are competing for the same prize, but the teams are rarely good at the same time. Rollins and Carlos Beltran traded jabs a couple of times and Cole Hamels suggested the Mets choked (actually, the words were put in his mouth by WFAN talk-show hosts), which was simply a statement of fact.

Early in their history, for obvious reasons, there was a rivalry with the Dodgers and Giants. In 1969, it was the Cubs. Then at various times the rivals became the Pirates, the Cardinals, and then the Braves.

Of all of them, the Braves might have been the most intense over the longest period.

When you look at the great rivalries in sports, the competition for the same goal is usually the basis. Then other factors, such as geography and certain players spice the rivalry.

From the Philadelphia perspective, much of their scorn for the Mets was personified in Jose Reyes, but he’s gone. There’s no real Met for Phillies fans to hate. Where’s Billy Wagner when you need him.

There’s really no team the Mets face that gets the blood boiling. The Yankees, because of interleague play, is more made-for-TV posturing. I covered it from both clubhouses and the responses where mostly clipped and cliche.

The only time I felt a genuine contempt by the clubs for each other was after 9-11, when several Yankees said they thought the Mets were getting more publicity for doing more than they were. Hard to understand that thinking considering the then major was at Yankee Stadium as much as City Hall.

Both teams were sincere about the community, but circumstances dictated more cameras were on the Mets at key times. The Shea Stadium parking lot was a staging area and Mets players loaded trucks while in uniform. Both teams visited local police and fire units. But, it was the Mets who had the first game back in New York.

And, the Mets threw quite a party that night.

That was the only time I thought seriously about the Mets and Yankees playing each other. The first game back? Oh, that would have been a special night.

But, when you’ve disappointed since 2006, and had limited spurts of greatness and then mediocrity for the better part of 50 years, it makes it hard to find a real rival.

I would say the Mets’ most intense rivalry for five decades has been with themselves.

 

 

Apr 13

It Would Be The Right Thing To Honor Chipper Jones

When Chipper Jones announced he would retire after the season my immediate thought was in how the Mets would do to acknowledge him. Now, when I hear some in the media and other bloggers are against it, I just scratch my head.

JONES: The Mets have been on the opposite end of that swing many times.

Yes, Jones has been a Mets Killer. All the more reason. Jones embraced the rivalry with the Mets – at a time when the Mets had real rivalries – and was passionate about playing here. So much so, that he named one of his children after Shea Stadium. He even bought Shea Stadium seats. And, on the night Mike Piazza hit that homer after 9-11, it was Chipper’s face we sought out from among the Braves. He was genuinely moved that night.

If he doesn’t want a rocking chair tour, fine, but something simple and genuine. Perhaps a weekend in New York with Broadway tickets, or a painting of Shea Stadium, or something to acknowledge how important he was to baseball summers in New York for years.

It’s petty to ignore him. So what if he was a nemesis. Boo hoo. Get over it.

Teams have long acknowledged and respected celebrated opponents for years. The Boston Celtics always had the right idea, giving a piece of the parquet to Julius Erving, to Kareem Abdul Jabbar, to Magic Johnson. And, Celtics-Lakers is more intense at any time than Mets-Braves.

Yes, they should acknowledge Chipper. It would be the classy thing to do. It would be the right thing to do.