Feb 21

Mets 2013 Promotional Schedule

The following is the Mets’ press release on their promotional schedule for the season, and yes, it includes bobblehead dolls and Banner Day.

 

METS ANNOUNCE 2013 PROMOTIONAL SCHEDULE

 Nearly 400,000 Giveaways for Fans of All Ages

 David Wright (June 30), Dwight Gooden (July 21) and Tom Seaver (August 25)

Join Ron Darling (April 21) and John Franco (May 25) in All-Star Bobblehead Series

Single Game Tickets Go on Sale Friday, March 1 at Mets.com and (718) 507-TIXX

 

FLUSHING, N.Y., February 21, 2013 – The New York Mets today announced the promotional schedule for the 2013 season at Citi Field. The Mets will give away nearly 400,000 items to fans of all ages highlighted by the All-Star Bobblehead Series featuring Ron Darling (April 21), John Franco (May 25) David Wright (June 30), Dwight Gooden (July 21) and Tom Seaver (August 25) and special events including Banner Day (May 11) and Fireworks Nights (July 3).  Single game tickets go on sale Friday, March 1 at Mets.com and (718) 507-TIXX.

Highlights of the 2013 season include:

ALL-STAR RELATED GIVEAWAYS

 Mets All-Star Bobblehead Series – The first 25,000 fans in attendance can collect a figurine depicting an iconic Mets All-Star:

·         Ron Darling presented by Citi – Sunday, April 21 vs. the Washington Nationals at 1:10 p.m.

·         John Franco presented by GEICO – Saturday, May 25 vs. the Atlanta Braves at 7:15 p.m.

·         David Wright presented by Verizon – Sunday, June 30 vs. Washington at 1:10 p.m.

·         Dwight Gooden presented by Gold’s Horseradish – Sunday, July 21 vs. the Philadelphia Phillies at 1:10 p.m.

·         Tom Seaver presented by Toyota – Sunday, August 25 vs. the Detroit Tigers at 1:10 p.m.

 Mets All-Star Gnome presented by Pepsi – The Mets will celebrate the return of the Major League Baseball All-Star Game to Flushing by giving away an All-Star gnome to the first 25,000 fans in attendance at the Tuesday, July 4 Mets-Arizona Diamondbacks game at 1:10 p.m.

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Feb 21

Mets Matters: Kirk Nieuwenhuis Gets Leadoff Opportunity

Several days ago I gave you my idea for the Mets’ batting order and it included Kirk Nieuwenhuis as the leadoff hitter, so I was happy to read Adam Rubin’s story he will be given first chance to win that job.

Nieuwenhuis will be the leadoff hitter for Saturday’s exhibition game against Washington.

kirkThe Mets like Nieuwenhuis’ patience – he sees over four pitches an at-bat – and he had moderate success in the role last year hitting .264 with an on-base percentage of .303.

Both numbers need to be improved, but it must be remembered he did this in his first look at major league pitching.

Before their slide Nieuwenhuis played center and hit leadoff and Terry Collins remembered: “ … when we were playing really, really well, that guy was in center field. So he deserves the right to get the first shot.’’

Nieuwenhuis can steal the occasional base, but he’s not known as a steal threat. Steals can sometimes be overrated, but fundamental base running is always in vogue. Going first-to-third, realizing when a ball will go through, and running to avoid a double play are all critical components of good base running.

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Feb 21

Some Team Numbers The Mets Must Improve

Winning the World Series is the ultimate definition of a successful season, something Mets fans haven’t experienced in nearly three decades. The checkdown list goes to playing in the Series, to playing in the LCS, to making the playoffs and to just have a winning season.

When you’re the fan of a franchise that hasn’t had a winning season since 2008, what is your definition of a successful summer?

Is it playing .500 or just playing competitive games? Tell me what will define a good season for you.

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Feb 20

Pete Rose Not In The Cards

There is nitpicking, there is pettiness, and there is Major League Baseball policy, which is in a category by itself. There’s no other way to explain my reaction to what I just read.

TOPPS baseball cards, of which I have tens of thousands, banned Pete Rose from its 2013 set. TOPPS not only won’t have Rose’s picture on any cards, but also won’t put his name on the back in a feature called “Career Chase,’’ where a current player is listed to how close he is to the all-time record. Since Rose has the record with 4,256 hits – his name won’t be found.

urlRose was banned from baseball for gambling on the sport, including on his own team, and because TOPPS has the exclusive right to produce MLB-licensed cards, Rose is ineligible to be listed. According to the letter of the contract, TOPPS is within its right to omit Rose, but this comes off as petty and vindictive by both the card maker and MLB.

The object of the game is to hit the ball, and nobody did it more than Rose. It’s like when Stalin had his opponents’ names and pictures stricken from the Russian history books. Stalin had them killed and names erased, but it doesn’t alter the fact they existed. MLB and TOPPS can’t issue an edict on Rose otherwise.

Rose exists and excelled at his game. In the process, he generated millions of dollars in ticket sales, memorabilia and souvenirs for MLB. If MLB wants to ban Rose from holding a baseball job I have no problems with that. However, banning Rose from all things baseball is petty and cruel spirited.

The Hall of Fame is a baseball museum, and despite its strong ties with MLB, it is still a museum. History is not neat and clean, it is messy and tumultuous, and its characters not always emblematic of the best human stock. The Hall of Fame is loaded with those who drank, cheated on their spouses, were racists who never wanted Jackie Robinson in the game, and even murdered.

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Feb 20

Don’t Ignore All The Old Baseball Statistics

I was talking with a friend of mine recently and the topic turned to baseball, and in particular, the overwhelming number of statistics in today’s game. Most are relevant, but others are too much. Does anybody really need to know David Wright’s slugging percentage on afternoon games played on Tuesday?

I’m old school, and my first three statistics in evaluating a position player are average, homers and RBI. The game has evolved and there are far more elaborate and sophisticated methods to measure performance. That doesn’t mean all the traditional numbers are obsolete.

I understand the significance of WAR and OPS, but sometimes that’s thinking too much and not as accurate as one might argue.

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