Feb 27

Mets Matters: Alderson Dishes On Kirk Nieuwenhuis, Travis d’Arnaud, Zack Wheeler And Strikeouts

mets matters

In a conference call this evening, Mets GM Sandy Alderson addressed several issues surrounding the team.

Among them:

* Catching prospect Travis d’Arnaud will not be allowed to block the plate.

* The leadoff spot is still up in the air and Kirk Nieuwenhuis, who is a candidate, still has work to do.

* If Nieuwenhuis plays fulltime he will strikeout over 100 times (he struck out 98 last year). That could give the Mets four players with over 100 strikeouts when you consider David Wright, Ike Davis and Lucas Duda. While strikeouts are a concern, they are offset by an increased on-base percentage and run production.

* If the Mets are competitive this summer, he knows he will face the dilemma of trading a pitching prospect for a hitter.

* Alderson said how the Mets handled Matt Harvey last year should buy him patience from fans wanting to rush Zack Wheeler. He added there’s no sense in force-feeding a young player if he’s not ready.

These and other issues from Alderson’s conference call will be explored in greater detail in future posts.

THE GAME: If the Mets could take one positive out of this afternoon’s 12-4 waxing at the hands of the St. Louis Cardinals, it is that Duda broke a 0-for-7 slide with ground single.

No, they did not stop the game to give him the ball.

Seven of those outs were strikeouts. Duda finished 1-for-3 with one strikeout, so it isn’t as if he’s found it all of a sudden.

Terry Collins noticed Duda had a more compact swing on the single and fly ball to left. It was longer on the strikeout.

Duda had been spending extra time in the batting cage to work on his mechanics, and will do so again tomorrow. He’s expected to play Friday against Detroit’s Justin Verlander.

As of now, Duda is penciled in as the left fielder. The Mets like his power potential (15 homers last year), but must be concerned about his wasted at-bats. He had 120 strikeouts with only 51 walks in 459 plate appearances.

WHEELER OUT: Wheeler was scratched from today’s start with a slight strain of his right oblique. Although the Mets have not said anything, expect him to miss at least another start.

WRIGHT PLAYS: Wright returned to the lineup with two singles. He’s not scheduled to play Thursday, but is Friday against Detroit at Port St. Lucie. Wright hopes to play third instead of DH in that game. On Saturday he leaves for the World Baseball Classic.

Feb 27

Wheeler Scratched From Start With Oblique Strain

It will not be the dream spring training for Zach Wheeler that he might have hoped. After all the Stephen Strasburg comparisons, Wheeler was scratched from today’s start against St. Louis with a mild strain of the oblique muscle.

Wheeler sustained the injury swinging a bat in pregame warm-ups. He said the injury was nothing serious and it felt a little stiff, but that is something we’ve heard numerous times from various Mets – notably Jose Reyes – over the years about this type of injury.

“I’d rather be out one start than two months and be behind the eight-ball when I do come back,’’ Wheeler told reporters. “Early in the spring you don’t want to risk anything. We have a month, or a month and a half, left.’’

Veteran Mets watchers will quickly say it will be more than one start, but he’s right, caution is the way to go on this injury. Muscle strains and muscle pulls always last longer than originally speculated; it’s a baseball variation of Murphy’s Law.

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Feb 27

Mets And Amway; An Odd Couple

This is why they are the Mets. Their ownership group gets stung by a Ponzi scheme, loses millions of dollars and was on the verge, with an unfavorable court ruling, of possibly losing the franchise.

So, what does it do? It aligns itself with Amway, a direct seller who has been sued for being a pyramid scheme.

imgresAmway employs millions to sell home cleaning products and vitamins, but mostly to convince others to do the same. That’s where an Amway distributor makes its money.

This is as odd a choice as the Mets could have made for a business partner. Seriously, doesn’t anybody in the organization have a filter that could have caught this?

“Excuse me, Mr. Wilpon, but we should think twice about this,’’ somebody should have said.

So, on the side of Citi Field there is a sign promoting Amway, a corporation which settled a class action lawsuit for millions after being accused of operating a pyramid scheme.

Nobody saw the connection?

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Feb 26

Mets Matters: Mejia Rocked; Wright Captaincy

Jenrry Mejia was hammered this afternoon by Miami in his spring training debut, giving up a grand slam in a five-inning first inning in the Mets’ 7-5 loss.

MEJIA: Not a good day.

          MEJIA: Not a good day. (AP)

Mejia gave up five runs on four hits in a 30-pitch inning. Apparently, few of those pitches were effective.

Terry Collins said Mejia didn’t have the darting cut on his fastball, and suggested the problem could be attributed to having Tommy John surgery after the 2010 season. That was the year Mejia was rushed as a reliever, demoted to the minor leagues where he started, then was injured.

The Mets still don’t know Mejia’s eventual role. He’s expected to start this year, but pitching coach Dan Warthen and minor league manager Wally Backman believe he’s better suited for the bullpen. Collins admitted to that after the game.

Mejia is expected to open the season in the minor leagues unless there’s an injury in the rotation.

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Feb 26

Response To Proposed Giancarlo Stanton Deal To Mets

I read with great interest what my colleague, Joe DeCaro, posted on his website about a possible trade for Miami’s Giancarlo Stanton in exchange for Zack Wheeler and Travis d’Arnaud.

STANTON: Interesting to think about.

STANTON: Interesting to think about.

There are compelling reasons for both teams to pull the trigger on this deal, but also for standing pat.

Personally, I don’t see it happening.

The Marlins don’t have to worry about Stanton’s contract until 2017, when he becomes a free agent. They are paying him a paltry $480,000 this year. The earliest the Marlins have to worry about paying him the big bucks is when he becomes arbitration eligible in 2014. He’s then a free agent at 2017.

If owner Jeffrey Loria were smart, and we know that’s not the case, he’d tie up Stanton now for the long term, but that’s not happening.

“We are hoping that that moment will come but Giancarlo needs to play this year,’’ Loria told The Palm Beach Post. “He is here for certainly the foreseeable future and we will cross that bridge at the appropriate moment.

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