May 04

Mets’ May 4 lineup vs. San Francisco

The Mets, losers of four of their last five games, will try to right things tonight at rainy and cold Citi Field against the San Francisco Giants.

Here’s the lineup:

Jose Reyes, SS

Daniel Murphy, 2B

David Wright, 3B

Carlos Beltran, RF

Ike Davis, 1B

Ronny Paulino, C

Willie Harris, LF

Jason Pridie, CF

Chris Capuano, LP

METS NOTEBOOK: Reliever Pedro Beato, one of the bright spots this season in the Mets’ pen, was placed on the disabled list with elbow tendinitis, retroactive to May 2. Replacing him on the roster is lefty Mike O’Connor. … Bobby Parnell has begun throwing in Port St. Lucie. … Josh Thole is struggling and with Ronny Paulino playing well, the former could see his playing time reduced.

May 04

Reyes trade rumors simmering again.

There’s buzz today after Jose Reyes’ stellar game Tuesday night when he reached base six times, unbelievably three times on walks.

REYES: We like his uniform dirty.

It is the kind of game the Mets routinely expect from Reyes, but one not often received the last two seasons because of a variety of injuries.

That the Mets couldn’t parlay such a performance into victory says that as potentially potent Reyes can be, this team still has weaknesses it must fix before it can return to contender status. These are holes that can be filled in part by what Reyes might bring back in a trade.

Bottom line: The Mets aren’t a contender now with Reyes and likely won’t be one if they deal him without making complementary deals.

Reyes passed the audition in the eyes of the San Francisco Giants, who, like every other team are discussing their options, of who interests them and whom they are willing to offer.

It is too early for serious trade discussions, but not too early to laying the foundation for when things heat up in June and July.

The Giants have not made and offer to the Mets for Reyes, but are doing their research. For the Giants, they will undoubtedly ask for a negotiating window, but if denied, San Francisco general manager Brian Sabean should have already decided whether he will sacrifice one of their top pitching talents or prospects to acquire Reyes as a rental.

From the Mets’ perspective, general manager Sandy Alderson must decide whether the return off prospects from the Giants, or Boston, or whomever wants Reyes, is greater than the draft picks they would get should the All-Star shortstop leave via free agency.

Alderson wanted to see two things from Reyes before deciding the 27-year-old shortstop’s fate in New York. The first was Reyes’ health, especially his legs and the first returns have been positive, although I find it puzzling as to why he didn’t try to steal second late in the game.

Secondly, Alderson wanted to see Reyes perform and for the most part he has with a .325 average and 11 steals in 29 games, but there were concerns about his on-base percentage before it surged to .377 last night. Still, an elite leadoff hitter, as Reyes is supposed to be, should be north of .400.

Reyes’ career on-base percentage is .336 and he has averaged 81 strikeouts and 51 walks a year during his career. The latter two numbers need to be reversed.

Reportedly the asking price for Reyes is a package of $100 million-plus, which Alderson said the Mets can afford, although they might not have much left for little else. With Carlos Beltran, Oliver Perez, Luis Castillo and likely Francisco Rodriguez off the books there should be plenty of money left after this season to bring back Reyes if they really wanted.

The Mets don’t appear inclined to push things with Reyes. Alderson said he’s not adverse to talking contract during the season, although Reyes has said to the contrary.

Alderson still has time to see if Reyes remains healthy and productive. Whether Reyes stays or not, the Mets will receive something in return.

What they really must decide is if they want Reyes instead.


May 03

Time to get Dickey some runs.

With a sub-4 ERA, R.A. Dickey has pitched well enough to have better than a 1-3 record.

DICKEY: A little help, please.

The fault lies in large part to the offense, which has given him just eight runs over his last four starts. That pretty much explains it.

The Mets won his last start when they rallied with a four-run ninth inning at Washington, but Dickey didn’t receive a decision as he gave up two runs in 6.2 innings.

The Mets’ offense overall has been in a funk as it has scored just nine runs while going 4-for-34 with runners in scoring position over the past four games following the team’s six-game winning streak.

David Wright is showing some signs of offensive life with five hits in his last three games, but he’s far from having things figured out with 32 strikeouts already this season in 110 at-bats.

Don’t forget, if you’d like to talk during the game, click onto the Mets Chat icon to your left.

May 03

Mets’ May 3 lineup vs. San Francisco.

With tonight being the first pro sports event in NY since bin Laden was killed, it figures to be an emotional night at Citi Field.

The Mets donated 4,000 tickets to servicemen for tonight’s game. Marine Corps Sgt. Elizabeth Quinones will perform “God Bless America’’ during the seventh inning stretch. The Mets also booked a color guard for the pre-game.

Here’s tonight’s lineup against San Francisco:

Jose Reyes, SS

Daniel Murphy, 2B

David Wright, 3B

Carlos Beltran, RF

Ike Davis, 1B

Lucas Duda, LF

Josh Thole, C

Jason Pridie, CF

R.A. Dickey, RP


NOTES: Jason Bay was placed on the Paternity Leave List to be with his wife, Kristen, for the birth of the couple’s third child. Replacing Bay will be Lucas Duda, who was hitting .257 (19-74) with four doubles, three home runs and nine RBI in 21 games for Triple-A Buffalo.


May 03

Mejia to have Tommy John surgery; must figure the worst.

Jenrry Mejia is seeking a second opinion on his medial collateral ligament, as is his right, but don’t bet the new doctor will offer a better alternative than Tommy John surgery. And, regardless of whom performs the surgery, the Mets can’t think all will be well in a year.

The Mets must continue on without Mejia in their plans, and although there are examples of pitchers who have come back from the surgery, there are similar examples of those who did not. Subsequently, the Mets must conduct business without Mejia in their plans and consider anything out of him in the future as a bonus.

The Mets eschewed an opportunity last season to deal Mejia, and the thinking at the time was sound. He was too good a prospect to just deal. I thought the Mets handled Mejia poorly last year in juggling his role, and it is speculation as to how much that contributed to the injury.

MEJIA: Mets must figure he's done.

It will be at least a year before we know whether Mejia will be sound enough to pitch, and even then there’s no guarantee he’ll be a hot prospect again.

There are examples on both sides of the aisle, of those who returned to have successful careers, and those who didn’t.

There’s no way of knowing where Mejia will be, but this much is sure, the Mets will be seeking pitching. The question is: How much are they willing to spend, both in prospects in the trade route and dollars in the free agency path next winter? The Mets must consider anything they get from Mejia as a bonus and look to build without him.

These pitchers made it back from Tommy John surgery: Josh Johnson, John Smoltz, Billy Wagner, David Wells, Tim Hudson, Mariano Rivera, Francisco Liriano and Chris Carpenter. And, of course, Tommy John.

These pitchers didn’t make it back: Kerry Wood (although he had a good season last year as reliever for the Yankees), Scott Williamson, Pat Hentgen, B.J. Ryan, Darren Driefort, Kris Benson, Phil Humber, Jaret Wright, Mike Hampton and Bill Pulsipher.

There is a wide enough sampling where it can go either way with Mejia, but we won’t know for at least a year, and there’s no telling what the Mets’ financial landscape will look like by then.