Feb 07

Spring Training Schedule

When your spring training home is on Florida’s Atlantic Coast, there aren’t a lot of opponent’s options. They have a combined 17 games against NL East foes Atlanta, Miami and Washington, which is not always desirable, especially when seven of their last nine games are against the division.

Feb. 12: Pitchers and catchers report.

Feb. 13: Pitchers and catchers physicals.

Feb. 14: First pitchers and catchers workout.

Feb. 17: Full squad reports.

Feb. 18: Position players physicals.

Feb. 19: First full squad workout.

Feb. 24: at Red Sox, 1:05 p.m.

Feb. 25: Nationals at PSL, 1:05 p.m.

Feb. 26: Tigers at PSL, 1:10 p.m.

Feb. 27: Astros at PSL, !:10 p.m.

Feb. 28: at Marlins, 1:05 p.m.

March 1: at Cardinals, 1:05 p.m.

March 2: Marlins at PSL, 1:10 p.m.

March 3: Astros at PSL, 1:10 p.m.

March 4: at Astros, 1:05 p.m.

March 5: Cardinals at PSL, 1:10 p.m.

March 6: at Marlins, 1:05 p.m.

March 7: OFF

March 8 (SS): at Astros, 1:05 p.m.; and Red Sox at PSL 1:10 p.m.

March 9: Tigers at PSL, 1:10 p.m.

March 10 (SS): at Braves, 1:05 p.m.; Astros at PSL, 1:10 p.m.

March 11: Nationals at 1:10 p.m.

March 12: at Tigers, 1:05 p.m.

March 13: Marlins at PSL, 1:10 p.m.

March 14: at Astros, 1:05 p.m.

March 15: at Marlins, 1:05 p.m.

March 16: at Nationals, 1:05 p.m.

March 17: Cardinals at PSL, 1:10 p.m.

March 18: at Cardinals, 1:05 p.m.

March 19: Marlins at PSL, 1:10 p.m.

March 20: at Tigers, 1:05 p.m.

March 21: OFF

March 22: Marlins at PSL, 1:10 p.m.

March 23: at Nationals, 1:05 p.m.

March 24: Astros at PSL, 1:10 p.m.

March 25: at Braves, 1:05 p.m.

March 26: Braves at PSL, 1:10 p.m.

March 27 (SS): at Marlins, 1:05 p.m.; Nationals at PSL, 1:10 p.m.

March 28: Cardinals at PSL, 1:10 p.m.

March 29: at Braves, 1:05 p.m.

NOTES and COMMENTS: 14 road games; 15 home games; no night games; 17 games vs. NL East opponents Washington, Miami and Atlanta; three split-squad dates; four exhibition games vs. Braves, including March 29, then open the season April 3 vs. Atlanta on Opening Day at Citi Field.

Feb 05

Potential Around Citi Field

With the Super Bowl today, I suppose this falls under the category of being a fantasy – much like the Jets playing in February. The Mets play in state-of-the-art Citi Field, but they need company other than the chop shops.

There’s what is, and what could be.

Citi Field needs company.

Citi Field needs company.

The Islanders are getting kicked out of Brooklyn, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Their fan base is from Long Island, so building a hockey arena near Citi Field seems like a natural thing. Islander fans are used to driving and the expressway is right there. Citi Field is also convenient to Connecticut, where the Islanders have a farm team. Plus, there’s always the 7 Line.

It can’t just be a hockey facility, either. Where is it written all rock concerts and college basketball must be in Madison Square Garden or Newark? Again, it’s easier to drive from the north than take the train into Manhattan.

Also, the Mets have always been linked to the Jets, and the latter playing in New Jersey – in the Giants’ stadium – just seems wrong.

They did right in Philly, with the Eagles, Phillies, Sixers and Flyers all in the same area. Baltimore, Kansas City, Detroit, Cleveland all have multiple sports facilities within walking distance of each other. Throw in some restaurants, a shopping mall and hotels, and don’t forget the Arthur Ashe Tennis Center, and you could be talking about one of the premier sports and entertainment centers in the country.

The Wilpons made their bones in real estate. They need to get on the phone with the Jets and Islanders and make something special happen.

Feb 04

Mets Agree To Terms With Blevins; Finish Offseason Shopping

Apparently, the Mets got tired of stringing along Jerry Blevins and according to several reports agreed to terms with the situational left-hander and Fernando Salas Friday evening before GM Sandy Alderson headed out for his Super Bowl parties.

Blevins will get $6 million for one year, plus an option. Salas will get a year. With the two agreements, the Mets finished work on their bullpen and concluded their offseason shopping.

Before kudos are sent out to Alderson for his patience, remember Blevins, 33, made $4 million last season while going 4-2 with a 2.79 ERA. So, realistically, how much money did he really save the Mets? A million? Not much more than that, really.

Considering Toronto was also after Blevins, and the Mets are still awaiting word on a suspension of Jeurys Familia, what’s the purpose of Alderson dragging his feet? It tells me the Mets are seriously aware of their spending, which can’t be encouraging if they must make a move at the break.

So, in a thumbnail wrap of the Mets’ offseason moves:

* They picked up the $13-million option on outfielder Jay Bruce as a hedge to possibly losing Yoenis Cespedes.

* They signed Cespedes to a four-year, $110-milliion contract.

* They signed Neil Walker to a $17.2-million qualifying offer.

Everything the Mets did was expected, although the dual signings of Bruce and Cespedes – they might have overpaid for the latter – created a logjam in their outfield.

Feb 03

How Will Collins Work In Reyes?

Among Mets manager Terry Collins‘ more interesting decisions this season will be where he’ll play Jose Reyes. Shortstop? Third base? Second base? The outfield?

REYES: Needs to get regular time. (Getty)

REYES: Needs to get regular time. (Getty)

It has been a long time since Reyes played second – remember the Kaz Matsui fiasco? – and the outfield would be forcing the issue considering the Mets have a glut of outfielders.

Satisfied with Asdrubal Cabrera at shortstop, the Mets brought back Reyes to play third when David Wright injured his back. Well, Wright is healthy now – knock on wood and fingers crossed – so where does that leave Reyes?

Because the Mets don’t have a bonafide leadoff hitter outside of Reyes, it’s important Collins devises a rotation with his infielders to keep him fresh and sharp at the plate. But, how many games is enough?

But, how many games is enough?

We can assume Collins will rest Wright at least twice a week, and if he subs him for Walker and Cabrera at least once, that’s four games, which should be enough. However, that’s not written in stone and leads to the question of much time will Wilmer Flores get.

It won’t be easy for Collins, but a rotation has to be made to juggle the priorities of giving Wright, Neil Walker and Cabrera regular rest and keep Reyes sharp at the top of the order.

Because the Mets have older and fragile players in their infield – of which Reyes is one – Collins should have enough opportunities to juggle this properly.

 

 

Feb 02

Mets’ D’Arnaud Down To Last Chance

One Met I’m hopeful for this season is catcher Travis d’Arnaud, who has to know he might be down to his last chance at becoming a starter. He hasn’t come close to reaching his potential – both at the plate and behind it – since coming over in the trade (along with Noah Syndergaard) that sent R.A. Dickey to Toronto.

D'ARNAUD:  Needs good year. (ESPN)

D’ARNAUD: Needs good year. (ESPN)

He has scary power when he connects – wasn’t he the guy who dented the home run apple? – but has been largely been inconsistent. But, I’m liking what I’m reading in The New York Post from Port St. Lucie.

D’Arnaud, who avoided arbitration by signing a one-year deal for $1.875 million, has been working hard with new coach Glenn Sherlock, and has come away with a new stance. Last year d’Arnaud wrapped the bat around his head which resulted in a longer and slower swing.

That’s gone now and the bat is on his shoulder pointing straight behind him instead of pointing at the pitcher. Sherlock is also working with d’Arnaud on quickening his throws to second base. Both are essential improvements for d’Arnaud, who hit only four homers with 15 RBI and threw out only 22 percent of potential baserunners.

“He was a huge help,” d’Arnaud told The New York Post about Sherlock. “For the team to bring him in shows they have my back and they want me to get better. So, it’s cool that he’s here.”

General manager Sandy Alderson said in addition to a shoulder injury, d’Arnaud’s confidence at the plate as impacted by his defensive problems:  “I just think there was a general loss of confidence that was reflected in his offense. It was reflected in his defense. I think that’s something that can be restored.”

Most importantly, d’Arnaud says he feels strong, which is important since injuries have limited to 250 games over the past three years. The Mets always believed keeping d’Arnaud on the field has always been the key to his production.

While the early reports have been encouraging, it’s still only February and d’Arnaud’s new stance and revised throwing mechanics haven’t been tested in a game.

The Mets have so many issues and questions going into spring training and d’Arnaud is certainly one of the most important. The Mets still have confidence in d’Arnaud – at least they have more in him than Kevin Plawecki – but after three years of little production, both parties have to realize this might be d’Arnaud’s last chance.