Aug 02

Matz Has Tight Forearm; Cespedes Goes Under Knife

The Mets knew Steven Matz had a tired arm when they sent him out to be drubbed for seven runs in the first inning in Tuesday’s historic 25-4 beatdown in Washington. Nonetheless, 15 games under .500 at the time and the competitive portion of their season long over, the Mets still started Matz when he should have been resting his arm.

After the game Matz never should have started, the Mets said he has discomfort in his forearm, which, you might recall is what started all of Matt Harvey’s arm ailments.

“He did mention after the game that he had a little tightness or discomfort in his forearm,” manager Mickey Callaway said. “I think we will get him checked out and go from there.”

By checking out, that means an MRI.

Matz has struggled since July 12 with his ERA going up from 3.31 to 4.35.

CESPEDES UPDATE: Yoenis Cespedes was scheduled to undergo surgery Thursday on his right heel to remove bone calcification. Dr. Robert Anderson performed the procedure in Green Bay, Wis.

Cespedes is expected to undergo the same procedure on his left heel in the next two to three months.

WAHL BROUGHT UP: Reliever Bobby Wahl, who came to the Mets from Oakland in the Jeurys Familia trade, was brought up. Wahl threw 7.2 innings in seven games with the A’s last season. The 26-year-old reliever has a 2.20 ERA in the Pacific Coast League this season between the Mets and A’s affiliates.

Wahl averages 14.6 strikeouts and 3.8 walks per nine innings.

Jul 31

Matz, Mets Routed; Can’t Avoid Worst Loss In Club History

As expected, the Mets didn’t trade any of their starting pitchers. Today’s trade deadline passed with only Asdrubal Cabrera and Jeurys Familia becoming ex-Mets.

They never were going to trade Jacob deGrom or Noah Syndergaard, but as today’s 4 p.m., deadline neared, it became apparent that even Zack Wheeler and Steven Matz wouldn’t be moved.

“We know the talent that we have, specifically on the pitching side,” assistant general manager John Ricco said. “We were not going to move those players unless it involved considerable talent coming back in our direction. While we had many offers and a lot of dialogue, we ended up not making a deal at this point through the Deadline.”

That means Wilmer Flores, Jose Bautista and Devin Mesoraco can all be traded if they pass through waivers prior to the August 31 deadline.

Ricco said the market was poor and that the Mets intend to compete next year. Then Matz went out and gave up seven runs in the first inning and the Mets had given up 13 runs through the third inning. They were down 19-0 in the fourth.

Jeff McNeil‘s first major league homer avoided the Mets from being handed the worst shutout in team history. After Jose Reyes gave up six runs in the bottom of the eighth, the Mets scored three times to lose 25-4 for the worst loss in franchise history.

This gives the Mets two months to figure out if they figure out what kind of team they can develop into a contender or should go into a complete rebuild.

“All that happened today is we did not make a trade by the Trade Deadline,” Ricco said. “I don’t think that necessarily means we’ve committed to one direction or another. What it does is it gives us another two months to evaluate not only the players themselves, but our club in general. It allows us to make a more informed decision this offseason with regards to the direction moving forward.”

If the Mets think competing was possible in 2019, they’ll have to do with pitching as they have little – other than pitchers – to offer in a trade and we know there’s precious little in the farm system.

As far as the Mets not dealing because of their trio of general managers in Ricco, J.P. Ricciardi and Omar Minaya, I’m not buying it. It’s not that I don’t think they are capable of making a trade, it’s just that there’s no reason to trade Wheeler or Matz now.

 

 

Jul 26

Mets Have To Believe Cespedes’ Days Are Over

Sure, the Mets caught a bad break in losing Yoenis Cespedes for the rest of this season and probably up to August of next year. However, the one thing the Mets must resist is the notation to think ”he’ll come back to superstar form in 2020.”

CESPEDES: His days with Mets are over. (AP)

CESPEDES: His days with Mets are over. (AP)

They have to avoid that line of thought because, after all, these are the Mets we’re talking about, so everything breaking right usually doesn’t happen. The best position for the Mets is to learn from their David Wright experience and just move on.

They have to believe they got the best of Cespedes, but with that means they have to accept the worse. They have to believe Cespedes is gone forever, and everything they might get from him in the future is a bonus.

But, they can’t believe they never collect on that bonus.

Assistant general manager John Ricco said the Mets won’t alter their short-term plans to accommodate losing Cespedes, and they shouldn’t change their long-term plans, either.

”Certainly, when you don’t have one of your best players on the field, you have to look at your team differently,” Ricco said, when asked if Cespedes’ surgery changes the Mets’ long-term strategy. ”At this point, we just found this information out in the last day or so. I think it’s a little bit too quick to speculate as to how we’re going to change our plan moving forward.”

He’s right on that. Trading somebody like Jacob deGrom for a power bat in the outfield isn’t the prudent move now, because where the Mets are situated today, losing a solid arm in exchange for a handful of home runs won’t make them any better. And certainly, it won’t elevate them to contender status.

Even with a healthy and productive Cespedes, the Mets aren’t a contender. The Mets shouldn’t concentrate on acquiring a Cespedes-type bat until they do reach contending status.

And, it isn’t imminent.

Currently, the Mets’ outfield consists of Michael Conforto, Brandon Nimmo and Jose Bautista. When he returns, throw Jay Bruce into that mix. This isn’t to say the Mets don’t need a healthy and productive Cespedes, but they can’t count on that now.

Or ever again.

Jul 25

Cespedes Done Until Next June At Earliest

The Mets, who have spent the better part of this lost season hoping Yoenis Cespedes would return from the disabled list, don’t have that problem any longer.

Cespedes returned from the disabled list Friday to homer against the Yankees, then dropped an even bigger bombshell after the game when he said he would need surgery on both heels and could miss up to ten months.

That would put his return at early June, but after assistant general manager John Ricco said today the Mets agreed he’ll have two surgeries three months apart that could put his return next year to sometime in August.

The official diagnosis was calcifications around both Achilles tendons and bone spurs on each heel.

But, you’re the Mets you might not even expect to see Cespedes at all next year.

After the 2016 season, Cespedes signed a four-year, $110 million contract, but by the time this year is over he will have played in just 119 of a potential 324 games. What’s even more aggravating is Ricco knew of Cespedes’ heel problems when they signed him in November of 2016, a test run season for him in which he was injured and played in only 132 games.

Cespedes, at his press conference today at Citi Field, said through an interpreter: ‘’Nobody would like to go through surgery at any time. I try to do my best to stay on the field and play a lot, but we exhausted all of the conservative treatment options. … I was not able to be on the field and play the same way I used to.”

The 32-year-old Cespedes missed 81 games last season, and went on the disabled list, May 14, with a hip flexor strain and missed nine weeks. The Mets believe the calcification in Cespedes’ heels forced him to change is running style resulting in the hip flexor strain.

“The general consensus is the pain he is feeling in his heels has definitely contributed to a change in his running style, because he is trying to avoid what is causing the pain,” Ricco said. “And that can certainly lead to other lower-extremity issues, whether they be the quad, hamstring or the hip. You get to the point where that doesn’t make any sense, because you’re just going to stay in that cycle.

“We had him checked out by the doctors, and they’ve agreed that we’ve exhausted the conservative options. Now, surgery is really the only way to resolve this issue.”

Ricco did say the Mets had an insurance on Cespedes similar to the one they took out on David Wright. That policy enables the Mets to recoup up to 75 percent of the $20 million Wright makes annually. Ricco wouldn’t say how the Mets would spend the money recovered through insurance.

“We haven’t gone down the road to what this means toward our plan moving forward,” Ricco said. “Generally, we don’t get into details of the insurance policy.”

 

Jul 22

Lack Of Communication Defines Mets’ Relationship With Cespedes

No, I can’t tell you with any certainty what is going on with the Mets or Yoenis Cespedes, these days. Nobody can. Not even Cespedes, although he does have a lot of explaining to do.

Actually, so do the Mets trio of general managers, not to mention COO Jeff Wilpon. The caveat is it will be preferable to get truthful explanations, not those that defy comprehension.

CESPEDES: No communication with Mets. (AP)

CESPEDES: No communication with Mets. (AP)

Or even logic.

Cespedes, after missing over 50 games with a strained hip flexor, returned from the DL Friday night and homered against the Yankees, then after the game said he needed surgery to treat dual heel calcifications and could miss up to ten months, which, if he went under the knife tomorrow could return next June.

Manager Mickey Callaway said “I’m not quite sure what he said,’’ about Cespedes’ bombshell announcement, but does it really matter? This was way above Callaway’s paygrade and should have been addressed way before Yankee Stadium Friday.

For example, who was the doctor who told Cespedes he needed surgery, and when did he tell him? It stands to reason this was a doctor not affiliated with the Mets, because if it was wouldn’t he/she have warned the front office Cespedes wasn’t ready to be promoted or cleared to return?

You would think so.

Also, when was Cespedes given this prognosis? Was it before Cespedes volunteered to play first base? Kind of convenient if it was, because wouldn’t it be just like Cespedes to make us feel good about him one moment just before he pulls the rug out from under us the next?

Of course, for the over two months Cespedes was on the DL, he said nothing to the media, which is consistent with his prima donna attitude. Sometime during those two months, somebody got into Cespedes’ head about his feet.

If I’m the Mets I’m doing two things: 1) wondering if the Mets have any legal grounds in which to void Cespedes’ contract and if they do not, whether they would attempt to buy him out.

After all, it is clear he doesn’t want to play for the Mets, and if he undergoes surgery on his heels, he will miss at least another five months if he has the good sense to have the procedure immediately.

But, that would entail Cespedes and the Mets acting in concert, but there’s a total disconnect between the factions.

It will never happen.

“I don’t think it’s a disconnect,’’ said assistant GM John Ricco. “It’s not like he has been saying this for months and we just haven’t been listening. For the first to our knowledge, the first he even was considering this surgery was when he said it on Friday.”

If that’s the case, then it is clear the Mets haven’t been talking with Cespedes recently. Isn’t that what is the very disconnect between the Mets and Cespedes?