Jun 17

Looking At Assets Mets Could Trade

The Mets didn’t go to the playoffs in each of the last two years by accident. They have some good players, several of whom could be welcomed by a contender.

After today’s 7-4 loss to the Nationals, the Mets are 11.5 games behind Washington, so regardless of the calendar, we might as well look at them as sellers at the deadline.

GSELLMAN: Could be valuable trade asset. (AP)

GSELLMAN: Could be valuable trade asset. (AP)

If they are so inclined, the Mets could have a fire sale for the ages.

When I look at today’s roster, I’m seeing four untouchables: Yoenis Cespedes, Michael Conforto, Jacob deGrom and Steven Matz.

Everybody else can be had. Here’s who could be available:

PITCHERS

Seth Lugo and Robert Gsellman have value and are currently in the rotation in large part because of injuries. They saved the Mets late last season and could have value to a contender.

Matt Harvey is currently on the disabled list but should be off before the deadline. His value is currently low, but a forward-looking team might take a nibble. However, trade talks for Harvey could grow in earnest if he stays healthy and fast forward to next summer.

A team simply looking for arms might shop in the Mets’ bullpen. The one who could draw considerable interest if they make him available is Addison Reed. Closers are valuable and Reed has proven himself under pressure. Let’s hope if they trade him it is to an American League team.

CATCHERS

For a team looking for a catcher, Rene Rivera or Travis d’Arnaud could draw interest.  The Mets can afford to trade either because they have Kevin Plawecki at Triple-A Las Vegas. For that matter, Plawecki could make for a backup.

INFIELDERS

Neil Walker and Asdrubal Cabrera should be off the disabled list long before the trade deadline. If they are healthy they could help another team the way they did the Mets.

Both could be free agents after the season so they would be nothing more than a rental.

The Mets tried to trade him once, so would it be surprising if they tried to deal Wilmer Flores again? And, he’s a lot better than he was in 2015 so the return could worthwhile.

Jose Reyes has a manageable contract, but he’s not playing well. Would a change of scenery help? It’s worth a shot.

Lucas Duda, who is currently healthy, has the potential to bring back something in a trade. With Dominic Smith on the rise, the Mets might as well test the market for him.

OUTFIELDERS

Isn’t it ironic that GM Sandy Alderson desperately tried to trade Jay Bruce in the offseason, and he’s currently the most productive Met? Actually, they would be foolish to trade him because of Cespedes’ fragility, but he can bring back the most in a trade.

Curtis Granderson has been hot since May 1, but his overall miserable numbers are attributable to his slow April. But, Granderson brings a presence any contender would find valuable.

Should the Mets go the fire sale route it would mean finding a spot for Conforto and leaving him there. It means bringing up Smith and Amed Rosario. If they keep him, it means finding a spot for Flores.

It would mean starting over.

Jun 16

Scherzer Toys With Fading Mets

“It’s only June … it’s still early,” some people say when talk turns to the Mets already falling out of the pennant race and becoming sellers at the trade deadline.

However, what the calendar reads and what the NL East standings say are pretty much in sync after tonight’s 7-2 loss to the Nationals.

SCHERZER: Couldn't touch him. (AP)

SCHERZER: Couldn’t touch him. (AP)

After being blown away by Max Scherzer – and Steven Matz giving up three homers – the Mets find themselves 10.5 games behind the Nationals and 11 out of the wildcard, and their season slipping away.

Rapidly slipping away.

Realistically, the Mets needed to win three out of four, if not sweep this series, to have a chance to catch Washington. The best they can hope for now is a split, and they’ll face Stephen Strasburg tomorrow.

Mets’ hitters managed one run on four hits against Scherzer in eight innings and struck out ten times. If there was a turning point in the game it came in the second when the Mets had two on and nobody out, but Scherzer got Travis d’Arnaud to ground into a double play.

“You saw he got really locked in around the third inning,’’ manager Terry Collins said. “You can’t him to get the lead on you.”

Scherzer is now 7-4 lifetime against the Mets, including a 17-strikeout, no-hitter two years ago.

TRANSACTIONS: The Mets placed Juan Lagares and Matt Harvey on the 10-day disabled list and recalled from Triple-A Las Vegas infielder Matt Reynolds and outfielder Brandon Nimmo.

UP NEXT: Seth Lugo (1-0, 1.29) goes against Stephen Strasburg (7-2, 3.27) Saturday afternoon. On Sunday, Jacob deGrom (5-3, 4.33) starts against Joe Ross (3-2, 6.39).

Jun 16

How Mets Derailed Harvey’s Comeback

Stuff happens, but why does it always seem to happen to the Mets? Let’s not disregard GM Sandy Alderson as a possible explanation. That’s certainly the case with Matt Harvey‘s recent trip to the disabled list for stress to his shoulder that is the cause for his tired arm.

ALDERSON: Bears responsibility for Harvey. (AP)

ALDERSON: Bears responsibility for Harvey. (AP)

When Harvey’s fastball barely touched 90 in spring training, pitching coach Dan Warthen said following thoracic outlet surgery one couldn’t expect him to be at full strength until the end of May. On March 15, I wrote if the Mets had the guts to leave Harvey off the Opening Day roster. They did not, of course, which isn’t surprising.

If Harvey wasn’t going to be full strength until May, then why was he on the Opening Day roster? Manager Terry Collins doesn’t make those decisions, Alderson does.

Perhaps there was a sense of urgency on Alderson’s part because neither Steven Matz nor Zack Wheeler were expected to be ready for the Opening Day roster. Even so, that’s not a good enough reason. Just because one player is injured and not ready it doesn’t give Alderson license to rush another player who isn’t ready.

Alderson had the authority to keep Harvey behind and chose not to. As far as Harvey goes, he’s staring at the end of his career and certainly wouldn’t rock the boat regarding his treatment.

The bottom line is that once again an issue involving Harvey was mishandled, but this time it was the Mets’ doing.

 

 

 

Jun 15

Mets Routed; Injuries Mount

The Mets aren’t fooling anybody with their new philosophy about not projecting how much time injured players could miss.

In placing Matt Harvey (stress injury to the scapula bone in his shoulder) and Neil Walker (partially torn left hamstring) on the 10-day disabled list, the Mets said they would each miss several weeks.

Figure at least a month before beginning baseball activities, and then add rehab time, so I’m guessing five to six weeks. Both players received platelet-rich plasma injections.

The Mets said they won’t begin rehab until pain-free, which is not what they did with Yoenis Cespedes. As if things weren’t bad enough, outfielder Juan Lagares – one of the few Mets who is hitting – fractured his left thumb attempting a diving catch.

Walker’s injury again raised the question of bringing up Amed Rosario, but GM Sandy Alderson again reiterated the intent is when he is brought up it will be for the long term and not a short fix.

In addition, Alderson said Noah Syndergaard won’t throw for at least four more weeks.

THE GAME: Once again the Mets gave up a first-inning homer – this time to Bryce Harper – but were actually in the game until the Nationals broke it open with a five-run fifth off Robert Gsellman and coasted to an 8-3 rout.

As usual, they couldn’t touch Gio Gonzalez, who increased his record to 10-1 lifetime at Citi Field.

Jun 14

Harvey Has Tired Arm

Mets manager Terry Collins turned to his pitching coach, Dan Warthen, in the third inning after a Matt Harvey pitch and asked, “What was that pitch?”

The radar gun read 89, and Warthen said he thought it was a slider, but wasn’t sure.

“Well, we better find out,” said Collins, who was concerned about his starter, who gave up back-to-back homers to Anthony Rizzo and Ian Happ to open the game.

Warthen reported back, telling Collins it was a fastball, but Harvey also told him his arm felt tired. Collins decided to give Harvey at least another inning, which could have proven costly after Kyle Schwarber’s monster homer over the Shea Bridge.

The amateur diagnosis is a fatigued arm, or dead arm, but the Mets will get something more official after he’s examined Thursday.

“It’s pretty tired,” Harvey said of his arm. “My arm wasn’t working at all. It’s frustrating to be taken out that early. It’s very difficult. There’s been a lot of discomfort. It’s been pretty hard on me physically.”

Harvey threw 104 pitches in five scoreless innings in his last start, but gave up four runs on three homers in four innings in tonight’s 9-4 victory over the Cubs.

Things haven’t been easy for Harvey this year following thoracic outlet surgery last year. Harvey used to be overpowering, averaging at least one strikeout an inning, but has only 54 in 70.1 innings this season. He’s also given up 67 hits and 35 walks for a lofty 1.45 WHIP, and 16 homers in 13 starts.

GRANDERSON HITS MILESTONE: If there is a positive about Yoenis Cespedes’ lingering leg issues since coming off the disabled list, it is giving Curtis Granderson more playing time. After battling back to tie the game at 4-4, Granderson hit the 300th homer of his career to jumpstart the Mets’ five-run eighth.

TODAY’S INJURY: Expect Neil Walker to go on the disabled list Thursday with a hamstring pull.