Sep 23

Mets Magic? To Be Determined

Greetings on the day after the latest Mets’ miracle. There have been times in my coverage of the Mets – which began in 2006 (and since 1998 overall of New York baseball) – where I have been called a curmudgeon, which is not entirely untrue.

I try to take more of a down-the-middle approach in my emotional perspective of the team. I don’t get too high or too low, and believe I’ve fulfilled my responsibility if there’s a balance between those who like my stuff and those who hate me.

COLLINS: Will he be smiling in a week? (AP)

COLLINS: Will he be smiling in a week? (AP)

There are times, I admit, when I take the hatred as a compliment.

Either way, after the Asdrubal Cabrera’s game-winner last night, the bottom line is the Mets remain tied with San Francisco and hold a slim lead over the Cardinals for the wild-card. Cabrera’s moment in Mets’ history is contingent on how this all plays out.

Will it be a Super Nova or a star that forever burns bright, like the ball that got by Bill Buckner?

It’s just stardust if the Mets fade and don’t make it; it’s special if they go on to win the World Series. The moment loses luster if they don’t run the table.

Can we agree this business of the Mets’ schedule giving them an advantage is nonsense if they don’t capitalize? Let’s face it, without Cabrera last night, and what Jose Reyes did shortly before, they would have lost four straight home games to sub-.500 teams.

The remaining schedule is largely irrelevant because: 1) those teams would love nothing more than to put it to these uppity New Yorkers; 2) those players are competing for 2017 jobs; 3) September call-ups add an unknown element to the stew; and, 4) after this weekend the last six games are on the road.

For those who insist the schedule means something, if the beginning of this week didn’t convince you, try this, if the Mets don’t make the playoffs, the biggest statistic working against them is that 26 of their 72 losses (36 percent) have been against sub-.500 Atlanta (10), Colorado (6), Philadelphia (5) and Arizona (5).

They lost another six to Miami, whom they play three games next week on the road.

Perhaps the Mets were due to win last night. Sometimes the odds work in their favor. But, was it magic? I wouldn’t go that far.

After all, there have been several times this season when it would have been easy to conclude they turned it around.

After a sluggish start, they closed April by winning 11 of 12 games, but limped through May with seven losses against cupcakes Atlanta, San Diego and Colorado.

They lost five games in June to the Braves and were swept in a three-game series in Washington to finish that month only four games over .500. The Mets appeared to turn it around with a four-game sweep of the Cubs in July, but gave up that momentum by losing three of four at home to the Nationals heading into the break.

You’ll recall manager Terry Collins saying it was “essential we play well,” in the stretch entering the break and coming out for the second half. They entered the break six games over .500 but ended July only four games over.

The Mets nose-dived to two games under in mid-August before Bartolo Colon stopped the hemorrhaging by beating the Giants in San Francisco. They went 9-2 to close August to give their season alive.

Unquestionably, the Mets have been snakebit with injuries to their young, vaunted rotation. Matt Harvey, Jacob deGrom, Steven Matz and Zack Wheeler are all gone. But, for all their bad luck, they’ve been kept afloat by Colon, Seth Lugo, Robert Gsellman and tonight’s spot starter Gabriel Ynoa, and the bullpen duo of Addison Reed and Jeurys Familia. Today we learned Saturday’s starter, Noah Syndergaard, will be scratched in favor of Sean Gilmartin because of a strep throat.

No doubt, the baseball Gods are toying with Collins.

Bad luck offset by good? Perhaps. But, Lugo has been brought down a peg and Reed and Familia have taken their lumps.

Wilmer Flores helped carry the team for a while, but hasn’t played in over a week because of a bad wrist (Collins took the hit for that by saying he should have used a pinch-runner). The Jay Bruce trade did not work out, but was offset by the resurgence of power from Curtis Granderson.

Cabrera and Yoenis Cespedes spent time on the disabled list, but came off smoking. Cespedes is now mired in a slump, although he came through with a big hit last night.

Matt Reynolds, James Loney, Brandon Nimmo, Rene Rivera, Reyes and T.J. Rivera have either come up from the minors or were rescued off the scrap team to produce big moments. However, Michael Conforto was sent down and this season has been a bust for him.

A lot has gone wrong for the Mets – I didn’t even get to the injuries of David Wright, Neil Walker and Lucas Duda – but the flip side is a lot went right to put them where they are today.

Was last night magic? I don’t think so. It was a magical moment but means nothing if not sustainable.

For every reason why I could write them off, there are reasons I can give why they are still alive. Through it all, like they were last season, resiliency is their greatest attribute.

They are alive with nine games remaining, and considering all that has gone, maybe that’s their magic for this year.

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Sep 23

Three Mets’ Storylines: Doctor, We Have A Pulse

Just when you think the Mets are dead and buried, they do something to justify how they’ve been historically characterized – Amazing. They do something to pull us closer to them; to steal our emotions after we’ve said “never again.”

CABRERA: Pulls us back. (AP)

CABRERA: Pulls us back. (AP)

On the heels of an excruciatingly draining loss the previous night when Yoenis Cespedes’ was denied a game-winning home run, the Mets twice climbed out of the abyss to pick up their beleaguered bullpen to beat Philadelphia, 9-8, in 11 innings.

Like cockroaches and Keith Richards, the Mets refuse to be killed. Down two in the ninth, Jose Reyes tied it with a one-out, two-run drive off Jeanmar Gomez.

The Mets later fell behind by two again in the 11th inning against closer Jeurys Familia, but they quickly responded in the bottom of the inning against Philadelphia reliever Edubray Ramos when Michael Conforto walked, Reyes singled and Asdrubal Cabrera hit a homer that might have saved the Mets’ season.

If the Mets go on to go far in the playoffs, or even win the World Series, it will be a defining moment in their season.

“We always keep our head up,” Cabrera said. “We’re pushing all the time. … As soon as I hit it I knew it would be out.”

All season the Mets lived and died with the home run. It was how they are defined. They thrived on the long ball tonight with three more – Curtis Granderson hit a two-run homer in the second – that brought them again to the emotional top.

How long they will sustain it is anybody’s guess.

Undoubtedly, the comeback was tonight’s main storyline, with the others being the bullpen and Seth Lugo’s rough start.

BULLPEN TAKES BEATING: How the Mets navigated the last two innings has been their strength all season. You could even make an argument the Addison Reed-Familia duo has been the most valuable aspect of their team.

It hasn’t been that way this week, as their late-inning bullpen has been torched for 17 runs after the seventh inning in the last four games.

Five of those runs were charged to Reed, who uncharacteristically gave up a three-run homer to Maikel Franco in the eighth inning. Three more were against Familia.

There are few – if any – Mets who have done their jobs this year better than Reed and Familia. Tonight the long ball saved them.

LUGO HAS ROUGH START: Eventually, reality would catch up with Lugo. It did when the Phillies’ Ryan Howard and Cameron Rupp hit back-to-back homers on consecutive pitches to open the fifth.

Lugo had given the Mets at least six innings in four of his last six starts, but Thursday gave us three runs on four hits and two walks in five innings. Normally pitch efficient, Lugo threw 87 tonight.

Even so, with the news Steven Matz is likely done for the year, should the Mets reach the NL Division Series, he’ll be their No. 3 starter.

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Sep 22

Mets’ Loose Threads: Sept. 22

Welcome to Loose Threads.

This will be a catch-all post. I talk with some of you on Twitter and realize it is hard in express your full thoughts in 140 characters. I also know some of you have other things on your minds.

So, I will post a Loose Thread daily.

Whatever is on your mind, if you have a question, want to raise an issue I haven’t touched, then use this post for those reasons. Also, if there’s something you want me to address, this is the post for you.  I will read and comment when I can.

Thanks,

 

John

Sep 22

Matz To Miss Friday’s Start; Should Have Surgery Sooner Than Later

I have more a feeling of relief than anything else with today’s news Steven Matz will be scratched from Friday’s start with persistence soreness in his left shoulder.

Good, not because Matz is still hurting. But good in the sense he won’t be pushed any longer, and in the best-case scenario, he can now be shut down and have the surgery on his elbow to treat a bone spur, and if possible, treatment on his shoulder which currently has him on the disabled list with an impingement.

MATZ:  Out for Friday. (AP)

MATZ: Out for Friday. (AP)

“It’s a shoulder, so it will be a few days to quiet down,’’ manager Terry Collins said. “It’s a process. Long toss, bullpen, maybe BP. That’s lot things to do in a short time.’’

So, even if Matz did come back, he wouldn’t be stretched out and would be used out of the bullpen, which presents a different set of questions.

Matz threw a bullpen last weekend, and had a 20-pitch session Wednesday. The Mets hoped he could start Friday against the Phillies, limiting him to 50 pitches and have Gabriel Ynoa follow him. Ynoa will now get the start.

Matz described the feeling in his shoulder as pain that differed normal soreness.

“Right now, I’m experiencing symptoms and go from there,’’ Matz said. “Sitting on the sidelines and not doing anything is not where I want to be.’’

Bringing back Matz was an ambitious idea, but smacked of desperation and similar to their handling of Jacob deGrom it might have been pushing the envelope too hard, too soon.

However, deGrom’s issue was to his elbow, but shoulders are believed to be more complex. Matz has both.

Of the Mets’ vaunted young rotation, Matt Harvey, Zack Wheeler, deGrom and now Matz will have surgery. And, it is possible Noah Syndergaard could have a procedure on a bone spur.

Since Matz was to have surgery this winter, it should be done as soon as possible to give him more rehab time.

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Sep 21

Three Mets’ Storylines: Bad Night For Collins

If you thought last night was bad for Mets manager Terry Collins, it wasn’t anything compared to Wednesday night.

For me, it began with his starting lineup and decision to not start Jay Bruce, but spiraled out of control with the handling of his late-inning bullpen, which had been a strength, but unraveled in the Mets’ 4-3 loss to the Braves.

FAMILIA: Fifth blown save. (AP)

FAMILIA: Fifth blown save. (AP)

Bartolo Colon pitched another gem, but was pulled in the seventh shortly after giving up a two-run homer to Anthony Recker to slice the Mets’ lead to 3-2. Colon was yanked for Addison Reed.

All season, the primary formula for the Mets’ success was their eighth-ninth inning duo of Reed and Jeurys Familia, but Collins – like a man poking the coals at a BBQ – couldn’t resist toying with success.

I would have stuck with Colon for another hitter because he’s gotten out of so many jams. Yes, Reed got out of the seventh. But, after Ender Inciarte reached on James Loney‘s error to open the eighth, Collins pulled Reed in favor of Josh Smoker to face Freddie Freeman. The Reed vs. Freeman history is small. Maybe no Met has been better at his job this year than Reed, but Collins was seduced by the lefty-lefty matchup.

“Freddie is 2-for-4 [against Reed lifetime and I just said this guy is too hot,” was how Collins began his Magical Mystery Tour of an explanation. “I thought [have him] face a power lefty. Got jammed, poke it in, you know. Again, we get the ground ball to start the inning (Loney’s error). … if we get that ground ball, we’re not in that situation.”

If. If we had ham, we’d have ham and eggs, if we had eggs.

Freeman singled to chase Smoker in favor of Familia for the five-out save attempt.

After a double-steal, Matt Kemp tied the game on a sacrifice fly for Familia’s fifth blown save.

The Mets had their chances in the eighth, but Yoenis Cespedes dogged it on a fly to left and barely made it to second  when Kemp couldn’t track down his fly ball. Cespedes mighty have made it to third – which he eventually stole – but died there to end the inning.

With two outs Collins pinch-hit Eric Campbell for Kelly Johnson. Then he hit Kevin Plawecki for James Loney – who entered the game hitting .357 in the previous nine games – to once again over-manage the lefty-righty nonsense.

The Braves scored the winning run against Familia in the ninth on Inciarte’s RBI grounder. Even so, the Mets had a chance in the bottom of the inning, but Inciarte robbed Cespedes of a three-run homer to end the game.

“A tremendous catch,” Collins said. “You won’t see a better catch.”

The catch was the play of the game, but the storyline was Collins’ use of his bullpen. The others were that the Mets might have already made a decision on Bruce and wasting Colon.

DECISION ON BRUCE: By pinch-hitting for Bruce Tuesday and not starting him Wednesday, one might surmise the Mets already made the decision to give him a $1-million buyout opposed to picking up his $13 million option.

It was an “uncomfortable” decision Collins made last night in sending Campbell to bat for Bruce. Campbell produced a RBI single, but the Mets still lost and there’s this fallout, so one can’t really say everything worked out for him.

Especially considering, with how the game was on the line tonight in the ninth inning, he sent Bruce up as a pinch-hitter. Tonight’s situation was even more dire. This is what aggravates me about Collins: Bruce isn’t good enough one night, but is the next.

There’s no disputing Bruce has not produced, but this has nothing to do with “playing in New York,” as the media likes to suggest, but simply a player trying too hard to produce for his new team. Collins wanted to give Bruce a mental health day, but used him as a pinch-hitter, so how can he say the player had time to collect his thoughts and let the rest work for him as it did Neil Walker, earlier?

That’s typical of Collins; he says one thing but does another.

The Mets traded for Bruce to jumpstart a dismal offense the same way Cespedes did last season. It’s clear Collins lost confidence – even though the Mets are 21-8 and back in the race without Bruce hitting – and obvious the Mets are writing him off for the rest of the way.

COLON SUPERB: Another game, another wasted start by Colon, who gave up two runs in 6.2 innings. The way it is stacked up now, Noah Syndergaard would start the wild-card game with Colon probably getting Game 1 of the Division Series against the Cubs.

That is if the Mets get that far.

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