Aug 30

Some Playoff Pitching Scenarios For Mets

Perhaps it is a moot point with the acquisition of reliever Addison Reed, but if Sunday’s win over Boston showed anything it would be if the Mets reach the playoffs, Noah Syndergaard‘s role should not be out of the bullpen. No way.

SYNDERGAARD: Keep him out of playoff pen. (AP)

SYNDERGAARD: Keep him out of playoff pen. (AP)

When you throw 97 mph., like he does, and pitches as he did Sunday against the Red Sox, it would be a waste to use him in relief. Syndergaard worked into the seventh and could have come away with a victory if the bullpen hadn’t coughed up the lead.

Tyler Clippard and Jeurys Familia were solid today, but the problem remains the seventh. There are times when Hansel Robles looks like the answer; there are times when he is the question.

Quite simply, Syndergaard is a stud who is far more valuable as a starter, and I definitely have more confidence in him than Steven Matz, who only has a handful of starts. I still think it wouldn’t be a bad idea to see what Matz is capable of as a situational lefty.

If the Mets are to see if Matz has anything out of the pen, they need to see him in September and can’t afford to wait until October. Speaking of that role, isn’t it about time manager Terry Collins experiment with Sean Gilmartin in that role?

There’s still plenty of season remaining and nothing is certain when it comes to even making the playoffs, especially with six games left with the Nationals.

It is a foregone conclusion that when the Mets come up with a playoff staff, Bartolo Colon won’t be on it, which could be a mistake. Colon worked in relief Saturday, and while I don’t see him coming in to face Matt Holliday or Kris Bryant in the late innings, I can envision him making an impact.

Whether it be extra innings or long relief, Colon has value and too many good moments with the Mets to be dismissed out of hand.

My playoff rotation would be Syndergaard, Matt Harvey, Jacob deGrom and Jon Niese. Who knows who’ll be working out of the pen, but it shouldn’t be Syndergaard.

Aug 30

Mets Should Sit Wright Today

I am happy for David Wright and his return to the Mets. In the handful of games he’s played last week, he’s swung the bat well and after an awkward first game in the field his defense has come around.

WRIGHT: Should sit today. (Getty)

WRIGHT: Should sit today. (Getty)

For all he’s gone through and all he’s meant to the Mets, he deserves the opportunity to play in October. That being said, I don’t want to see him play today.

Wright did not play Saturday because of stiffness in his throwing shoulder, and despite two straight losses to Boston, there should be no sense of urgency to get him in the lineup.

Collins said there’s nothing wrong with Wright’s lower back, but why take the chance? Give him an extra, two if need be, because they have Juan Uribe.

Uribe can field the position and has been productive at the plate.

Plus, his heads-up play Saturday in which he backed up a throw to second and almost caught David Ortiz shows his head is always in the game.

The last thing I want right now is a setback with Wright. He’ll say he’s fine, because that’s what he does, but Collins should sit him and only use him as a pinch hitter.

Be smart, Mets.

Aug 29

Mets Add Reliever Reed From Arizona

Multiple sources report the Mets helped address their shaky bullpen by trading for Arizona reliever Addison Reed, who is making $4.875 million this year and is arbitration eligible in the offseason.

Reed started the season as the Diamondbacks’ closer but was taken out of the role in mid-May and eventually optioned to the minor leagues in June. Reed, 26, is 2-2 with a 4.20 ERA in 38 appearances this season and has two blown saves in five chances.

What makes Reed attractive to the Mets is his effectiveness against lefty hitters, who are batting .242 against him this season after holding them to .210 and .219 the last two years.

The Mets are set at the end of the game with set-up man Tyler Clippard and closer Jeurys Familia, but are having problems in the seventh inning. Reed figures to get a chance at that role and will get competition from Hansel Robles and Logan Verrett.

Verrett,stellar in a spot start last Sunday, gave up three runs on two homers Friday in relief of Matt Harvey. Robles, 3-2 with a 3.67 ERA in 41.2 innings over 43 appearances this season, has shown flashes of immaturity, highlighted by two quick-pitch incidents this week in Philadelphia.

Other reports have the Mets are talking with San Diego about left-hander Marc Rzepczynski.

The Mets are expected to add to their bullpen depth when the rosters expand Sept. 1 by adding Bobby Parnell, Erik Goeddel, Dario Alvarez and possibly Scott Rice. The last two are lefties.

On Saturday, the Mets used Bartolo Colon in relief on his between-starts throw day.

 

Aug 29

Upon Further Review: Lagares Blew Play

It is totally irrelevant, 100 percent, replays showed Blake Swihart’s drive off the wall that resulted in an inside-the-park home run would have been ruled a conventional homer had it been reviewed.

Also irrelevant, and unacceptable, is Juan Lagares’ explanation that he saw the ball go over the line.

“One hundred percent,’’ Lagares told reporters. “It hit over the line. That’s why the ball came back that hard.’’

LAGARES: Didn't make the play. (AP)

LAGARES: Didn’t make the play. (AP)

Yes, it did, but that doesn’t matter. More important were his actions during the play. I don’t want to say Lagares is lying, but I’m not buying what he said.

If Lagares really thought the ball struck over the line, then why did he run after it? Actually, he jogged after it, which is also not acceptable.

OK, Lagares misplayed the drive and indicates he’s continually plays too shallow. He won the Gold Glove last season, but he’s not good enough to play that shallow. He’s not Paul Blair, not Curt Flood, not Willie Mays, not Andruw Jones, and not Andrew McCutcheon. Not even close. A lot of balls have gone over his head this season. (Sorry for the side rant, but that has been building up for awhile.)

The only ones who handled the play properly were Swihart, who never stopped running; the umpires, who never gave the home run call because they didn’t see that; and Ruben Tejada, who ran into the outfield to get the ball.

“I thought it had gotten over because of the way it bounced back, but I just kept my head down running,’’ Swihart said. “I kind of watched the center fielder jogging after it, but I didn’t hear anything so I kept running.’’

Notice how Swihart said Lagares jogged after the ball. He kept running out the play; Lagares did not.

And, give left fielder Yoenis Cespedes a bag of popcorn for the way he watched the play. It hasn’t been the first time he hasn’t hustled.

Lagares needs to hustle after the ball because you never know until the umpires make the call. As a player, you never assume anything, out or safe, fair or foul, until the call is made.

Lagares’ judgment and Cespedes’ lack of hustle can’t be tolerated, not in spring training and especially not during a pennant race.

After the game, manager Terry Collins conceded Cespedes and right fielder Curtis Granderson didn’t do their jobs, saying: “Somebody’s got to back him up.’’

However, Collins was not quoted regarding Lagares’ part other than to say the ball went over the line. Here’s wrung him out in his office after the game. The Mets are in a race, so this stuff needs to be cleaned up now.

Last night doesn’t cut it in October.

Aug 28

High Flying Mets Due For Letdown Loss

Even after blowing another Matt Harvey start Friday night, a lot of things are breaking for the Mets these days and it is adding up to a wonderful summer. If it keeps going like this, it could be a great October.

For example:

HARVEY: Another no-decision. (Getty)

HARVEY: Another no-decision. (Getty)

* For most of his tenure as general manager, Sandy Alderson sat on his hands at the trade deadline, but this year brought in Yoenis Cespedes, Kelly Johnson, Juan Uribe and Tyler Clippard.

Perhaps the most defining, at least in regard to the tweaking of the Mets, was when the Wilmer Flores-for-Carlos Gomez trade fell through and Alderson was able to get Cespedes.

In May and June, and much of July, the Mets hungered for runs. But they’ve been mashing lately, and despite falling behind by three runs and down to their last out, the Mets fought back and the game ended with the winning run on base. Still, four days after hitting a club record eight homers in Philly, they were able to do little with the 12 walks the Red Sox gave them. That can’t happen if they make the playoffs.

* Speaking of Clippard, he fell into the Mets’ hands after blockhead Jenrry Mejia‘s second drug suspension. The Mets have bullpen problems, but not having an eighth-inning set-up reliever could be devastating. Now, the problem is filling in the seventh and this is where not having Mejia hurts.

On Friday they were forced to go with Carlos Torres the day after he pitched multiple innings against the Phillies. Not wanting to extend Harvey and not comfortable with his bullpen options, the Mets had to stay with Torres. This will be an issue in the playoffs.

* After not having David Wright for nearly five months, he homered in his first at-bat, but more importantly has been able to catch up to the speed of the game defensively.

* After Harvey was skipped and given 11 days of rest, there was some wonder as how he would do Friday night against Boston, but six scoreless innings with eight strikeouts answered that question. Of course, in watching the Mets blow the game, the nagging question about monitoring innings resurfaced. If he stayed in for another inning could extra innings have been avoided?

Perhaps, but Collins made a point to emphasize that in the playoffs he would have stayed with Harvey.

So many good things have happened for the Mets lately, including losing on the same day Washington lost. The NL East isn’t a given because we’ve seen leads slip away before, but before that harrowing thought takes seed, first we must look at Friday night as a simple speed bump.

After all, Jacob deGrom is pitching Saturday.