Feb 13

Syndergaard Is Unquestioned Ace

Manager Terry Collins will say it multiple times this spring, that the “Mets don’t have one ace they have four aces.’’ Noah Syndergaard said it this weekend, “I really wouldn’t say I’m the leader of the staff. I think we’re all leaders in our own way.”

Uh, no. Syndergaard is the guy. He’ll be the Mets’ Opening Day starter and he’s unquestionably their staff ace.

SYNDERGAARD: No doubt he's No. 1 (AP)

SYNDERGAARD: No doubt he’s No. 1 (AP)

For one reason, providing the bone spur in his elbow has calmed down, he’s the healthy one in the rotation. Jacob deGrom, Matt Harvey and Steven Matz are all coming off surgery, and Zack Wheeler hasn’t pitched in two years.

Secondly, Syndergaard’s 100 mph., heater registered 14 victories and 218 strikeouts, and as last season progressed and deGrom and Matz faded from the scene – Harvey dropped out early – it became apparent he had blossomed into a star.

“From the young pitcher that we acquired from Toronto to the successful major league New York icon that he’s become, it’s just a phenomenal metamorphosis,” GM Sandy Alderson told The New York Post.

Then, there was his ace-defining moment in the Wild Card Game against San Francisco’s ace Madison Bumgarner. Syndergaard took a no-hitter into the sixth and struck out ten Giants. The Mets ultimately lost 3-0.

Syndergaard reported to spring training having added 17 pounds of muscle for the intent of throwing harder.

“I always want to throw harder and make the game easier,” Syndergaard told reporters. “I felt my velocity jumped up last year from my rookie season. I ‘ll try to raise that bar. … Hopefully, it allows me to go deeper into games with more ease, but also focusing on and maintaining my flexibility.”

That’s an ace talking.

Feb 13

Today In Mets’ History: Cone Tries Comeback

On this date in 2003, hoping to recapture the glory of his career, David Cone came out of retirement to sign a minor-league contract with the Mets. Cone compiled an 80-48 record from 1987-1992 with the Mets.

CONE: One more time. (AP)

CONE: One more time. (AP)

Cone made the team and went 1-3 with a 6.50 ERA in five games with the Mets. Cone beat the Expos in his first start, 4-0, giving up two hits in five innings, but the feel-good comeback soon fizzled as he lost his next three starts.

His last game came in relief, May 28, with two scoreless innings at Philadelphia.

Cone compiled a 194-126 record over 17 seasons. He twice won 20 games, going 20-3 with the 1988 Mets and 20-7 ten years later for the 1998 Yankees.

Cone won the Cy Young Award in a strike-shortened 1994 season with Kansas City going 16-5 with three shutouts.

Cone carved out a reputation as a big game pitcher with an 8-3 postseason record, including 2-0 in the World Series.

ON DECK: Syndergaard Is Unquestioned Ace

 

 

 

Feb 13

Mets Today: Settling In; Remembering Cone

Good morning all.

No workouts are scheduled for today at Port St. Lucie, but pitchers will be throwing and there will hitters taking their swings in the covered batting cages.

Those who haven’t already will get their physicals and tomorrow workouts begin.

Later this morning, in “Today in Mets’ History,” we’ll revisit David Cone coming out of retirement in 2003 in an effort make the Mets rotation.

My post for the day will be on Noah Syndergaard.

ON DECK: “Today in Mets’ History”

Feb 12

Four Spring Training Questions Facing Mets

Despite the snow, winter ends officially today as the Mets’ pitchers and catchers report to spring training in Port St. Lucie. Once they break out the balls and bats, winter ends, but not necessarily the questions for the Mets.

There are four pertinent questions and issues the Mets must answer in spring training.

HARVEY: One of many health issues. (AP)

HARVEY: One of many health issues. (AP)

Who in the starting rotation is healthy, and will there be innings limits?

A: Matt Harvey, Jacob deGrom, Steven Matz and Zack Wheeler are all coming off arm surgery. For all the potential of their young arms, the Mets aren’t likely to go four-for-four on the recovery front. Somebody will have a setback. We just don’t know who. But, that’s more for the regular season, but for the next six weeks manager Terry Collins must determine a rotation order following Opening Day starter Noah Syndergaard. Collins must also decide Wheeler’s role; fifth starter or reliever? Collins and GM Sandy Alderson must pick a role and stay with it for at least this season. Jumping from one role to another can’t be good for Wheeler’s arm. It didn’t work out that way for Jenrry Mejia, did it? Unlike in 2015 with Harvey, there must be a definitive innings limits for these guys. They won’t like it, but it is in the best interest in keeping them healthy.

What are the bullpen roles?

A: Pencil in Addison Reed to replace closer Jeurys Familia while he serves a suspension. But after him? Is the set-up man Hansel Robles or Jerry Blevins or Seth Lugo/Robert Gsellman? If either Lugo or Gsellman is the set-up man, will the other be the long man? Or will one be the fifth starter? If Wheeler is in the pen, he needs a set role as to reduce the strain on his arm? How many relievers, six or seven? Will they keep three lefties, with Sean Gilmartin and Josh Edgin joining Blevins?

What is the back situation?

A: Lucas Duda, Neil Walker and David Wright are recovering from back surgery. Wright hasn’t played a combined 100 games in the last two years. Walker took a qualifying offer because he didn’t have any other options and the Mets didn’t like the other first base options if they lost Duda. Wright? Michael Conforto? How about Wilmer Flores full time? None of those options were appealing. The path of least resistance was bringing back Duda and hoping for the best with his back. By the end of spring training, we should have a better idea as to the health of these three. Collins must also create a plan of giving them rest in the hope of keeping them healthy? Collins has a bench for a reason and has more than just keeping Wright fresh to consider. It is Wright plus two.

How does he juggle the outfield?

A: First of all, will Yoenis Cespedes ever move back to center? The Mets brought back Cespedes the first time under the contingent he plays center. They brought him back the second time under the condition he plays in left. The current plan is, from left to right, Cespedes, Curtis Granderson and Jay Bruce. Alderson’s plan to deal Bruce hit a snag when brought back Cespedes because teams deemed him desperate and offered little in return. Bruce needs to play to show production and up his trade value. Granderson, at 35, can’t play center full time, so Juan Lagares will be the fourth outfielder because he’s the only true center fielder. That leaves Conforto scrapping for at-bats.