Jan 07

Forget About Reyes In Center

There’s been some talk about playing Jose Reyes in center field at times this summer to take advantage of his speed. It’s a thought best left for a 17-degree night in January with a foot of snow on the ground. Seriously, what’s the purpose?

With the guy they re-signed last winter to play center not wanting to – that being, of course, Yoenis Cespedes – the Mets have a muddled outfield and tinkering with Reyes in center just complicates things further.

As it is, Curtis Granderson, Michael Conforto and Gold Glover Juan Lagares will share time in center. Then, there’s Brandon Nimmo if he’s on the 25-man roster. Why fool around with an unproven Reyes in center?

Makes no sense.

Reyes needs to stay on the left side of the infield, backing up David Wright and Asdrubal Cabrera, where he’ll do the most good. Center field is something to talk about when it’s too cold outside to do anything but think about baseball in an effort to keep yourself warm.

Jan 06

Mets Will Likely Pick Up Salary To Deal Bruce Or Granderson

The Baltimore Orioles have a deep bullpen and are in need of a DH and/or a corner outfielder. Meanwhile, the Mets need relievers and it is no secret they are trying to trade Jay Bruce and/or Curtis Granderson.

So, why can’t these teams get together on a trade? They seem like logical trade partners.

Sure, it would be great to snag Zach Britton, but that’s a fantasy, and it would take a lot more than Bruce or Granderson. In the Orioles’ six-man bullpen, Odrisamer Despaigne, Vance Worley and Ubaldo Jimenez are the last three on the depth cart, so we can probably start from there.

Reportedly, the Orioles would like to trim from their 2016 payroll of $147 million, so it’s not difficult to conclude if a deal is worked out the Mets would have to pick up some of Bruce’s ($13.1 million) or Granderson’s ($15 million) salary.

Jan 05

Applaud Mets’ Move To Name Alfonzo Brooklyn Manager

I really like the move the Mets made to name Edgardo Alfonzo manager of their Class A Brooklyn affiliate. His staff will include Royce Ring as pitching coach and Sean Ratcliffe as hitting coach.

ALFONZO: Good move. (TOPPS)

ALFONZO: Good move. (TOPPS)

If Alfonzo someday wants to manage on the major league level – even if not with the Mets – this is the best way to go about it.

I’ve always said the Mets should embrace their history, and Alfonzo goes down as one of the best. He played from 1995 to 2002, and hit .324 with 25 homers in 2000 when the Mets reached the World Series.

At 43, he’s young enough to relate to today’s player, especially those that are Latin American.

Alfonzo knows the game well, and has the first-hand knowledge of what it is like to play in New York.

I can’t tell you whether Alfonzo will be a good major league manager and someday lead the Mets. However, if he does, this is the best first step.

Good move.

Jan 04

Wondering How Mets Will Use Flores

One Met I am curious to see how manager Terry Collins uses this year is Wilmer Flores. Collins has always run hot-and-cold with his usage of Flores, which probably stems from GM Sandy Alderson’s public knocks of the player he unsuccessfully tried to trade in 2015.

FLORES: Needs to play. (AP)

FLORES: Needs to play. (AP)

Frankly, Flores has never gotten an opportunity to play full time, and it won’t come this year. However, there is a way to get at least 500 at-bats and not greatly infringe on the playing time of Lucas Duda, Neil Walker, Asdrubal Cabrera and David Wright/Jose Reyes.

The solution is simple and stems from Flores’ best attribute – other than hitting against left-handed pitching – and that’s his versatility.

He would play first one day, second the next, shortstop the third game and third base the fourth.

Doing this requires discipline on Collins’ part, a trait he has not exhibited. If Collins were to pull this off it will accomplish the following: 1) give Flores more and consistent at-bats, and 2) provide rest for the Mets’ older and injury-prone infield.

It will be well worth it to give Walker and Wright regimented rest, and it wouldn’t hurt for Cabrera and Duda, either.

The bottom line is the projected 2017 Mets’ infield could be gone after this season and they must find out what Flores can do.

Jan 03

My Hall Of Fame Ballot

The New York Times recently published a story claiming baseball writers softened their stance against voting for players connected with PEDs. Well, they didn’t contact me about my ballot that does not include Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens, Sammy Sosa or Ivan Rodriguez, all of whom have been connected to steroids.

MUSSINA: Got my vote.(Getty)

MUSSINA: Got my vote.(Getty)

I always considered it a privilege to be a Hall of Fame voter; one I take very seriously. I always believed taking steroids was cheating.

The fundamental misconception of steroids is it enables a hitter to crush a ball 500 feet or adding a couple of feet to a fastball. That’s not it. Steroids enable a player continuing to work out when exhausted. The issue isn’t added strength but increased bat speed that generates to power. For pitchers, it heightens stamina allowing him to work longer into games.

And, for all users, there’s an increase in the confidence of better production.

There have been some reporters whose litmus test to detect cheaters was the back-acne test. Every voter has their own criteria, and I have three: 1) the player had to have failed a drug test and subsequently failed in the appeal process; 2) he had to have been mentioned in the Mitchell Report or any other MLB sanctioned investigation or report; and 3) he had to have been outed, on the record, by a player, coach or baseball official.

If the Hall of Fame changes its protocols and puts on the plaque a player used PEDs – after an admission by the athlete – then I will reconsider and vote for a user.

The following were on my ballot:

Mike Mussina:  Won 20 games for the only time in his 18-year career in his final season. Of course, he could have hung on to win 300. Won at least 15 games in 11 seasons. Won 270 games, falling 30 short of what traditionally has been automatic entry. His .638 winning percentage is sixth best among those who won 250 games. Received Cy Young Award votes nine times.

Jeff Bagwell: There have been rumors, but nothing substantiated. He garnered 71.6 percent of the vote last year – missing out by 15 votes – and every player who received at least 65 percent of the vote got in. Bagwell hit over 30 homers in nine of his 15-year career with Houston. He averaged over 100 runs scored and 100 RBI per season during his career.

Tim Raines: Is on the ballot for the final time before going to the veteran’s committee. He’s arguably one of history’s greatest leadoff hitters, joining Pete Rose, Lou Brock and Rickey Henderson. He was a lifetime .294 hitter with a .385 on-base percentage and stole 808 bases in 954 attempts (the best percentage in history at 84.7 percent).

Trevor Hoffman: A seven-time All-Star finished with 601 saves in his 18-year career. His career hits-per-innings ratio of 6.9 leads all relievers. Recorded at least 30 saves in 14 of 15 seasons and had over 40 nine times.

Lee Smith:  What is wrong with being a compiler? You have to pretty good to hang around for 18 seasons and have 13 straight years of 20-plus saves, 10 of 30-plus saves and three of 40 or more. He ranks 12th all-time in games pitched with 1,022. He ranks third all-time with 478 saves.

Edgar Martinez: Designated hitter is an official position, so why should he be penalized for playing the majority of his games there? MLB named its award for best DH in his honor. Martinez hit at least .300 in ten seasons and is one of nine players to hit 300 homers, 500 doubles, a career average over .300, a career on-base percentage over .400 and a slugging percentage over .500.

Fred McGriff: This one I call a testament for hitting clean. It used to be 500 homers was automatic entry into the Hall of Fame; McGriff hit 493 in 19 seasons. He hit over 30 homers ten times and drove in at least 100 runs eight times. No whispers about him doing it the right way.