Aug 30

Matz Won’t Pitch Thursday; Is Having Surgery Now Best Option For Mets?

Let’s face it, they wouldn’t be the Mets if bad news didn’t follow the good. It has been that kind of season and appears it will continue that way with Tuesday’s announcement Steven Matz won’t make Thursday’s start with an impingement in his left shoulder.

MATZ:  Is it best to shut him down now? (AP)

MATZ: Is it best to shut him down now? (AP)

Matz said everything is structurally fine and this isn’t a surgery issue, but many Mets pitchers said the same. He’s currently on the disabled list with soreness in his left shoulder, and also has a bone spur that will require off-season surgery.

Sigh …

“[It’s] just a little irritation … it’s still bugging me a little bit,” Matz told reporters Tuesday. “I don’t quite feel like I can let it go yet. … `I felt like I was making progress, and then I threw off the mound a little bit, and I felt OK coming out of the there. And then [on Monday] I tried to throw and it was kind of barking at me a little bit again.

“For me to get on the mound and throw a bullpen and tell them I’m ready for a game would just be unrealistic in my mind.’’

Good for him.

Robert Gsellman will take Matz’s spot in the rotation, although Jacob deGrom – who was scratched Monday in favor of Rafael Montero because it was believed he was fatigued – will start Thursday against the Marlins. When the rosters are expanded Thursday the Mets will bring back Montero and can afford to go day-by-day with Matz.

But, is that the best thing for Matz?

At most, he would get four more starts, but would a better option be to shut him down completely, have the elbow surgery immediately, which would give him another full month for recovery and rehabilitation?

The obstacle to that thinking is the Mets are only 2.5 games out of the wild-card race. The playoffs are a possibility, and if the Mets get there they’ll want Matz.

But, will they really have him, and at what capacity?

Please follow me on Twitter

Aug 29

Three Mets’ Storylines: Cespedes Makes Statement

It is hard to say what was the more deafening sound, the Citi Field crowd after Yoenis Cespedes’ game-winning homer or the cash register in Jeff Wilpon’s mind ringing up what the Mets might have to pay to bring him back next summer and beyond.

Cespedes has two years remaining on his contract, but can opt out after this season. The contract calls for him to make $27.5 million this year and $25 million in each of the next two seasons.

CESPEDES: Flexes Mets to win. (AP)

CESPEDES: Flexes Mets to win. (AP)

Cespedes said he’d like to stay with the Mets, but stopped short of saying he will come back. If stands to reason that the better Cespedes performs – he had three hits, including his 27th homer in the 10th inning to beat Miami, 2-1 – the greater his leverage.

To bring Cespedes back, they’ll have to increase both dollars and years. It’s easy to say, “well, just give him the money,’’ after what he did Monday, but the Mets will then have to make a decision on Jay Bruce and Curtis Granderson, and what to do with Michael Conforto.

Bruce has done little since coming over from the Reds. They could buy out Granderson. And, in April, Conforto was penciled in to be the Mets’ No. 3 hitter for the next decade.

However, none of them have what Cespedes does, which is the ability to jumpstart and carry a team with one swing. The Mets have had only a handful of players that no matter, they force you to watch and not look away when they come to the plate. Dave Kingman was one, then Darryl Strawberry and Mike Piazza. Finally, there is Cespedes, who carried the Mets last season into October, and has been doing it again since coming off the disabled list.

“He’s that kind of player,” manager Terry Collins said. “You expect to see big things from him each and every time he comes up. People pay to see him. They want to see what he can do.”

Cespedes can be infuriating, such as not running out a pop-up that fell for a hit in the first. Against Jose Fernandez, you knew runs would be at a premium and not hustling into scoring position could have bitten them in the end.

Even with his tight right quad, he should have been on second. However, that gets filed away when he takes control of a game as he did facing off against Nick Wittgren with two outs in the tenth.

“In big moments I really try to focus and deliver,” Cespedes said through an interpreter. “I know they were pitching me away, but I was looking for something in.”

Cespedes’ game-winning drive was clearly the top storyline of the night. Jose Reyes stealing a run in the eighth and the pitching from Rafael Montero and the bullpen were the other two.

A REYES RUN: When the Mets signed Reyes at the end of June, they sold the fan base on the premise he would bring energy and speed to their station-to-station offense. What they had in mind was the eighth inning.

Down by a run, Reyes lead off the eighth with a line double into the right field corner. When it appeared Alejandro De Aza failed to advance him on a fly to left, Reyes tagged and moved to third, then scored on a head-first slide following A.J. Ramos’ wild pitch.

Reyes appeared to be hurt on the play when Ramos fell on the Met infielder’s head and left shoulder. Reyes remained in the game, but we’ll see how he feels tomorrow.

MONTERO FILLS BILL: Montero made the spot start because the Mets believed normally scheduled starter Jacob deGrom – who gave up a combined 13 runs in his last two starts – was fatigued. Montero, brought up from Double-A Binghamton, gave up only two hits in five scoreless innings, but threw 100 pitches in large part because he walked six.

If Collins wanted to see if Montero could respond to a challenge, his concerns were answered in the positive. Montero was in constant trouble and left the Marlins stranded with RISP in the first, fourth and fifth.

Montero left the bases loaded in the fourth and needed a double play to get out of the fifth. With how he pitched, Montero will stay after the rosters are expanded, Sept. 1.

While Montero was the unexpected, the bullpen was something they counted on.

Addison Reed gave up a run in the eighth on doubles by Ichiro Suzuki and Xavier Scruggs. The Mets also received scoreless innings from Sean Gilmartin (6th inning), Jerry Blevins (7th), Jeurys Familia (9th) and Josh Smoker (10th).

Combined, the bullpen gave up one run on three hits, one walk and six strikeouts.

Please follow me on Twitter

Aug 29

Mets’ Lineup, Aug. 29, Against Miami

Asdrubal Cabrera – today named the NL Player of the Week, and Neil Walker, will sit out tonight’s game against Miami at Citi Field. Citing his recent performance in his last two starts, Jacob deGrom‘s start is being skipped and Rafael Montero will pitch.

Montero was recalled from Class AA Binghamton to make the start. Montero, 25, was 4-2 with a 1.70 ERA in eight starts at Binghamton. Montero appeared in two games with the Mets in April and gave up three runs in 2.1 innings.

Here’s the Mets’ order behind Montero:

Jose Reyes – SS: Was 0-4 Sunday vs. Phillies. … Hitting .360 (9-25) with RISP.

Alejandro De Aza – CF: Was 1-4 Sunday. … Has 13 RBI in August.

Yoenis Cespedes – LF: Did not play Sunday. … Hitting .337 (31-92) lifetime vs. Miami.

Kelly Johnson – 3B: Went 1-4 Sunday. … Hit pinch-hit grand slam Saturday. … Has four pinch-hit homers this year.

Curtis Granderson – RF: Went 0-2 is last game. … Is hitting .160 (19-119) over his last 32 games.

Wilmer Flores – 2B: Went 1-3 in hlast game. … Hitting .282 (33-117) lifetime vs. Miami.

James Loney – 1B: Went 1-3 in last game. … It’s been 88 at-bats since his last homer.

Travis d’Arnaud – C: Went 1-4 in his last game. … Mets are 25-29 when d’Arnaud starts.

Montero – RHP: Last major league start was April 28, 2015 at Miami.

Please follow me on Twitter

Aug 29

Here’s Hoping Mets Are Right On DeGrom Rest

Jacob deGrom isn’t starting tonight because GM Sandy Alderson and manager Terry Collins believe he’s been off his last two starts – 13 runs on 25 hits – due to fatigue.

Let’s hope they are right, because if it is anything else the Mets might be sunk. It’s staggering to think any pitcher could be tagged like that, much less deGrom.

DE GROM: Hoping rest works. (AP)

DE GROM: Hoping rest works. (AP)

From his perspective, deGrom initially said he didn’t feel tired, but later admitted the rest could help. It certainly couldn’t hurt.

DeGrom said he’s physically fine, with no residual effects from a strained lat muscle that briefly sidelined him early in the season. DeGrom is still throwing high heat.

So, why is he pitching like his double in the Geico commercial?

Of the three, velocity, command and movement, deGrom knows throwing hard is the least important.

“It’s hard to get results when you throw everything right down the middle,” deGrom said after getting ripped in his last start in St. Louis. “That’s what it is. I’m missing down the middle and these are big league hitters and that’s what they do.”

If deGrom misses when throwing inside, the pitch tails over the middle. If he’s aiming for the outside corner, it just sits there.

Pitching is all about location, and deGrom is living in a bad neighborhood.

Please follow me on Twitter

Aug 29

Mets Have One Less Question With Reyes At Third

Jose Reyes has lived up to all expectations since he was signed. He’s provided an offensive spark, he’s been far more than adequate replacing David Wright at third base, and Reyes being Reyes, he’s also been hurt with a strained muscle.

REYES: Has answered questions. (AP)

REYES: Has answered questions. (AP)

The Mets signed Reyes to a minor league contract in late June after he served a 52-game suspension stemming from a domestic abuse incident. Reyes expressed remorse in his initial statement with the Mets and has been a good soldier since.

He’s been great in the clubhouse and also in dealing with the media and public. In that regard, the Mets couldn’t have asked for more. There were some negative articles written at the time he was signed, but nothing since.

Offensively, Reyes has provided spark and energy at the top of the order. He’s hitting .285 with a .333 on-base percentage, with 14 extra-base hits, including four homers. It took awhile, but he’s starting to run more and has six steals.

I think the biggest surprise is how he’s taken to the position defensively. It’s one thing for Reyes to pick Wright’s brain, but there’s been nothing glaring about how he’s played.

The ball comes to him a lot quicker at third, but he’s been adept and hasn’t been handcuffed. He’s also shown he can handle the bare-handed pick-up and throw.

Is Reyes polished at third? No, that’s premature to say, but he’s by far not a liability. Is he the second coming of Wright in his prime? Nope, but in case Wright doesn’t come back full strength next season, the Mets will be in good hands with Reyes.

Since it is clear the Mets won’t give Wilmer Flores a shot at the job full time, they have one less question facing them this winter.

Please follow me on Twitter