Jun 17

Wright Injury, Lack Of Offense, Could Force Mets To Deal Harvey

I don’t know if we’ll see David Wright will play again for the Mets. I would hope so, but one never knows.

However, what we can be reasonably sure of is we’ll likely never see the Wright who hit at least 26 homers and drove in 100 runs five times in a six-year stretch.

HARVEY: What could he bring in return? (AP)

HARVEY: What could he bring in return? (AP)

The Mets haven’t been hitting for the better part of the last six weeks. Wright and Lucas Duda are on the disabled list. Michael Conforto and Yoenis Cespedes are starting to show breakout signs after being in lengthy slumps.

Don’t forget both Cespedes and Neil Walker can leave after this season. And, we don’t know if the Mets will need to replace Wright, but they will need to add offense. Let’s not limit the offense to power, but the ability to hit with RISP.

Catcher, first base, second base, third base and an outfielder will be on GM Sandy Alderson’s shopping list this winter, and not all of those voids will be filled by free agency.

Given that, it might be time explore dealing one of their young arms. They dealt Zack Wheeler along with Wilmer Flores for Carlos Gomez, but that fell apart.

Once again, this leads to speculation they might be willing to part with Friday’s starter, Matt Harvey, who was so-so against Atlanta after three consecutive strong starts.

Harvey, who worked six innings against the Braves, will be a free agent after the 2018 season. He’s making over $4.3 million this year and is arbitration eligible after the next two seasons, so he has a reasonable contract.

With Noah Syndergaard, Jacob deGrom and Steven Matz in the rotation, Wheeler on the disabled list, and the recently drafting pitchers Justin Dunn of Boston College and Anthony Kay of UConn, the Mets seem in good shape with their starting pitching.

And, with the belief his agent, Scott Boras, won’t seek to negotiate early and won’t leave money on the table – the recent deal signed by Steven Strasburg notwithstanding – this might be the time to deal Harvey in need of offense.

That Harvey has pitched well in three of his last four starts _ he gave up four runs in six inning Friday – and has shown he’s healthy after undergoing Tommy John surgery in 2013 enhances his value.

Depending how the remainder of the season shakes out, dealing Harvey might be something to explore. Seriously.

 

Jun 16

What Are Mets’ Options Without Wright?

The Mets announced third baseman David Wright underwent successful surgery today to repair a disk in his neck. What they did not announce was what happens next.

Dr. Robert Watkins, who performed the surgery, and Mets’ doctors advise rest as Wright recovers from the cervical discectomy and fusion.

WRIGHT: What happens next? (AP)

WRIGHT: What happens next? (AP)

“After trying every way to get back on the field, I’ve come to realize that it’s best for me, my teammates and the organization to proceed with surgery at this time,” Wright said in a statement released by the team.

“`My neck simply did not respond to any of the treatments of the past few weeks. While incredibly frustrating and disappointing, I am determined to make a full recovery and get back on the field as soon as I can to help the Mets win. I greatly appreciate the support of my teammates and our fans throughout the last few weeks.”

Wilmer Flores is the immediate option, but left Thursday night’s 6-4 victory iover Pittsburgh in the third with a bruised left wrist. Kelly Johnson and Ty Kelly are on the 25-man roster. There has also been speculation of Neil Walker moving from second to third and Dilson Herrera being promoted from Triple-A Las Vegas.

The most appealing of those is to stick with Flores.

Those are the internal options. As far as trade options, it is generally considered too early to deal. Of course, it would have been great to get Todd Frazier last season, but that’s ruminating.

Third basemen scheduled to be on the free-agent market this winter are Daniel Descalso (bench player for Colorado), Martin Prado (starting and hitting .331 for Miami), Justin Turner (starter for Los Angeles) and Luis Valbuena (starter for Houston).

Traditionally, future free agents are often traded if their teams know they can’t sign them. But, the Mets have to understand they have no chance at Prado or Turner.

Milwaukee’s Aaron Hill, San Diego’s Yangervis Solarte or the Angels’ Yunel Escobar have also been speculated as potential trade options.

“`Everything has been discussed,” manager Terry Collins told reporters. “We knew a few days ago that this was a definite possibility, so we’ve talked about other options – about moving guys. We’re still open to anything, but right now, for the short term, this is what we’re going to do.”

However, when it comes to Wright, there really is not a short term. The odds are we probably won’t see him again this season, and if so, likely not before September. That means the Mets need to be thinking long-term options.

 

Jun 15

Surgery Might Be Wright’s Best Chance

Like everybody else, I want to see David Wright be healthy and productive for the Mets. But it won’t happen this year and there are no guarantees about the future. Wright is currently mulling over the possibility of season-ending neck surgery with Dr. Robert Watkins. Should he have it, there are no assurances of when he’ll be ready for the 2017 season.

WRIGHT: What will he do? (AP)

WRIGHT: What will he do? (AP)

Far be it for me, or anybody else for that matter, to tell somebody to have surgery, especially in an area as vital as the neck. As I found out with my surgery in 2014 for a broken arm that backfired and caused me to be hospitalized for six months and leave in a wheelchair, stuff happens.

However, Wright’s case it is far more complicated than a broken arm. What we do know is there are no guarantees with rest and rehabilitation, either. If he goes that route, comes back and is reinjured to where surgery is a must, then not only this season, but perhaps much of next year will be gone, too.

Matt Harvey faced the same dilemma in 2013 before relenting and taking the Tommy John.

Wright is 33. He was diagnosed with spinal stenosis last year and was out for nearly four months. He’s currently on the disabled list with a herniated disk in his neck. He was off to a sluggish start – seven homers with 14 RBI – when he was injured. He was also having a rough time in the field, most notably his throwing.

Wilmer Flores is currently the third baseman and hitting well since taking over. Eric Campbell and Ty Kelly also spent time at third.

The Mets’ offense has been non-productive for nearly six weeks, averaging less than four runs a game. There’s no immediate help in the future from the minor leagues or in a possible trade. Mike Schmidt isn’t walking through that door.

I want to see Wright play, but I would rather he be healthy. That’s why I would opt for the surgery.

 

Jun 14

Moving Granderson To Third Is Best Mets Can Do

The argument for the Mets using Curtis Granderson in the leadoff spot last year was his high on-base percentage. Fueled by 91 walks, it was a solid .364 last season, which enabled him to score 98 runs.

His current numbers refute that argument. Granderson’s on-base percentage is a puny .316 this year with only 27 walks, but 61 strikeouts. These are numbers not befitting a leadoff hitter, which is why the decision to move him to third in the order, sandwiched between Asdrubal Cabrera and Yoenis Cespedes is a good one.

GRANDERSON: Seeking a spark, Mets move him to third on order. (Getty)

GRANDERSON: Seeking a spark, Mets move him to third on order. (Getty)

Actually, there is not much else the Mets could have done. They aren’t hitting, especially with runners in scoring position. They aren’t getting on base. They have three starters on the disabled list and Neil Walker’s back and Michael Conforto’s wrist have them sidelined. With no help coming from the minors or in a trade, it is time to tinker.

With no help coming from the minors or in a trade, it is time to tinker. Moving Granderson to a traditional RBI spot seems like a logical first step, For his 12 homers, he should have a lot more than 20 RBI.

The Mets’ order tonight reminds me of when managers of slumping teams pulled the lineup out of a hat. It’s not quite that bad for Terry Collins, who was released from a Milwaukee hospital and will be on the bench.

Here’s tonight’s order:

Alejandro De Aza, LF: His .181 average isn’t encouraging, but he’s fast enough to be considered at the top of the order.

Cabrera, SS: Is hitting .267, but has been fairly consistent. Is not really a No. 2 hitter in the classic sense, but is comfortable here.

Granderson, RF: Not the prototypical No. 3 hitter, but his power (12 homers) fits in the middle of the order. He should have more RBI and should get more opportunities more RBI opportunities with Cabrera, and perhaps in the future, Juan Lagares hitting ahead of him. Hitting ahead of Cespedes, his walks could increase.

Cespedes, CF: Has hit five of his 16 homers with RISP. Overall, in the 57 games in which he has played, he’s batting .282 with 16 homers, 40 RBI and 34 runs scored. In his first 57 games with the Mets last year, he hit .287 with 17 homers, 44 RBI and 39 runs scored.

Kelly Johnson, 2B: Is 4-for-9 since coming over from Atlanta. Has gone 55 at-bats since his last homer, so he’s due.

Wilmer Flores, 3B: Is hitting .406 (13-32) since taking over for David Wright. Hit a game-winning single to beat the Pirates, June 8, at Pittsburgh.

James Loney, 1B: Has done well in place of Lucas Duda, including hitting a two-run homer, June 3, at Miami. Is a lifetime .314 hitter against Pirates.

Kevin Plawecki, C: Hitting only .205. I can see the Mets sticking with Rene Rivera as the backup when Travis d’Arnaud comes off the disabled list probably next week.

Jacob deGrom, P: Lost to the Pirates, June 7, giving up three runs in six innings. DeGrom hasn’t registered a win since April 30, getting two losses and five no-decisions in that span.

As I wrote the other day, the Mets are floundering and in dire need of a spark. Maybe this is it.

Jun 13

These Mets Made You Watch

Yoenis Cespedes has turned out to be one of those hitters, the kind that grab your attention and keep your eyes transfixed to the plate, whether you’re at the ballpark or watching on television. When he steps up, whether you’re heading to the concession stand or the refrigerator your heads turn to him like a rubber necker staring at a highway accident.

STRAWBERRY: Stirred us. (AP)

STRAWBERRY: Stirred us. (AP)

Everything can wait until you see what Cespedes does. It could be another home run; a line drive into the gap; or he could screw himself into the ground striking out. It doesn’t matter because it was an event.

Cespedes is one of four Mets that I believe who mesmerized us with their power.

Dave Kingman was the first. He was long and lean, once a pitcher. But, strong and launched 154 homers in his six years in two stints with the Mets, most of them high, arching moonshots.

Kingman came to the Mets from San Francisco, purchased for merely $150,000. He was the total all-or-nothing slugger with 442 career homers and 1,816 strikeouts.

Another was Hall of Famer Mike Piazza, who hit 220 homers eight years with the Mets. Piazza came to the Mets from the Dodgers – after a week layover in Miami – and lead them to the 2000 World Series. Piazza’s swing uncoiled, almost in slow motion, but the ball jumped off his bat.

Piazza authored arguably the most memorable homer in franchise history with his game-winner over the Braves in the first pro sports event in New York following the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Others hit longer or higher home runs. Others hit them in October. But, Piazza’s was undoubtedly the most emotional and will never be forgotten,

Finally, there was Darryl Strawberry, the only one of the group who was home grown. He hit 252 homers in eight years with the Mets, and things froze at Shea when he came to the plate. Strawberry played for the Mets, Yankees, Dodgers and Giants – all four of New York’s baseball teams.

If there was one Strawberry blast that defined his power and strength, it was his blast off the scoreboard clock in old Busch Stadium.

There were other Mets who hit significant, if not dramatic, home runs. David Wright, Carlos Beltran and Carlos Delgado. Lenny Dykstra, Rod Swoboda and Tommie Agee also hit memorable home runs for the Mets.

But, Strawberry, Piazza, Kingman and Cespedes made us stop and watch.