Apr 28

Today’s Question: What Next For Mets?

The Mets arrived in Washington last night 7.5 games behind the Nationals. They didn’t get that far behind them last season until July 29.

question-1969017__340First up will be the MRI results of Yoenis Cespedes‘ left hamstring that will reveal what we already know, it is serious and he’ll go on the disabled list. Tonight’s outfield will feature Michael Conforto, Juan Lagares and Curtis Granderson.

They are hurting for offense, so perhaps they might pull the trigger and bring up Amed Rosario. Ironically, it would be at a time when Jose Reyes seems to be finding his swing.

Reyes homered Thursday and after said energy was needed and the Mets can’t afford to fall too deep in the standings. If the Mets are swept this weekend, they’ll be double-digit numbers behind heading into May and Panic City.

They could also bring up Sean Gilmartin, which would mean the disabled list for Noah Syndergaard.

Finally, and most importantly, is will they find the energy manager Terry Collins said they are lacking?

In each of the last two years, the Mets overcame long stretches of dismal hitting and sluggish play to reach the playoffs. The Mets listened to Collins then, but will his message sink in this time?

 

 

 

 

Apr 27

Syndergaard, Cespedes Lost … Is Season Far Behind?

Welcome, my friends, to Panic City, where your mayor, GM Sandy Alderson and his deputy, Terry Collins, have some serious scrambling to do before they take their last place Mets into Washington for a three-game series with the Nationals.

While Alderson was in his office after today’s 7-5 loss to the Braves – the Mets’ sixth straight – weighing his limited options, Collins was delivering his annual, closed doors, “nobody is going to feel sorry for you … it’s time to grind it out, starting now,” address to his shell-shocked team, losers of ten of their last 11 games.

CESPEDES: Yes, things can get worse. (AP)

CESPEDES: Yes, things can get worse. (AP)

Collins was in a testy mood following a day when starter Noah Syndergaard and outfielder Yoenis Cespedes were lost.

Syndergaard has biceps tendinitis and the Mets hope he’ll be ready for Sunday, but they are accomplished at wishful thinking. Cespedes, whom the Mets gambled was back from a tight hamstring, significantly pulled it legging out a double in the fourth inning and will be lost for an extended period.

Cespedes will get another MRI Friday and likely will be placed on the disabled list before facing Max Scherzer in Washington. There, he will join Lucas Duda, Wilmer Flores, David Wright, Steven Matz, Seth Lugo and Brandon Nimmo.

Collins, his voice getting louder with each name, ticked them off one at a time, Duda, Wright, Matt Harvey, Neil Walker, Asdrubal Cabrera, Cespedes, Matz, Jacob deGrom and Travis d’Arnaud, and said the Mets eventually pulled it together to reach the playoffs.

“I told them, ‘We can do it again, but it’s got to start now,’ ” Collins said. “OK, so the weather is gonna start changing. That can no longer be the excuse. It’s now time to go out and grind it out as we did last year.

“It’s still April, I understand that, but, we can no longer sit back and say, ‘It’s ugly weather, we’ve got some guys hurt.’ No one cares. [The Braves] don’t care, the Nationals don’t care. The only thing that matters are the guys in [the clubhouse], because that’s the product. They’ve got to care. They’ve got to come out, play with some energy and get this going and I truly believe they can do it.”

When asked the timing for this message, Collins played the perception-reality card, Collins said he’s aware of the talk energy is down, but that’s to be expected when your team batting average is .184 and on-base percentage is .268 during this slide.

“Look, it’s just April, I get it, but it’s time,” Collins said. “We’ve got a tough road trip ahead. … We’ve got to grind it out. We can do it, but we’ve got to start now.”

Now, is best defined as Friday in Washington, where the Mets, currently 7.5 games behind the Nationals, will try to stop their free-fall. As of now, deGrom, Zack Wheeler and to-be-announced will start, but Collins can’t say whether the offense will show, especially with Cespedes out.

“We’ve got to go out there and have energy,” said third baseman Jose Reyes. “We know we are going to better than this. … We’re going to see what we’re made of. It’s only April, we have five more months. We don’t want to go too deep in the standings. We have a good ballclub and we’re going to turn it around.”

It’s going to be difficult without Cespedes and Syndergaard. Collins said losing Cespedes “is a big hole.”

Losing Cespedes could have been prevented had the Mets acted proactively, which they did not. Instead, they kept hoping he’d get better. By putting Cespedes immediately on the disabled list, he might have missed both Washington series. Instead, foolishly gambling on a player with a history of muscle pulls, they not only miss Cespedes for both Nationals series, and for possibly up to a month.

“No,” a defiant Collins said when asked if he had any regrets by not putting Cespedes on the disabled list a week ago.

“He did all the things that were required to get in the lineup,” Collins said. “It just happens. It’s easy to say you should have put him on the DL. Well, you know what? Every time you turn around for every little thing, if you keep putting guys on the DL, we can’t run anybody out there.

“The guy pulled a hamstring. He’s wound tight. I am going to go with that. Now he’s going to be out for awhile.”

In saying Cespedes is wound tight, and especially after last season, are specifically the reasons why he should have been put on the disabled list. But, Collins doesn’t make those decisions; he’s there to shield GM Sandy Alderson from the flack he deserves.

As for Syndergaard goes, the Mets can afford a few extra days in making a decision because as a pitcher he works every five days. Syndergaard was supposed to start Wednesday, but was scratched because “I wanted to,” said Collins, not because he felt something in his arm while shagging fly balls before the game.

Syndergaard said the discomfort is in his shoulder and biceps area and isn’t a reoccurrence of the bone spur that bothered him last season.

“It’s quite obvious we can’t take a chance on him,” Collins said. “He’s a big piece of the puzzle.”

Prior to the game, Syndergaard said, “it’s a little thing right now, but we definitely don’t want to become a big thing,” but after the game got testy with a team official for not preventing reporters from questioning him.

Harvey started in place of Syndergaard and was lit up by the Braves. He got a phone call early today saying he would start.

“I really physically prepared for starting today,” said Harvey, who lifted weights Wednesday. “Having those workouts that I did yesterday and the throwing that I did yesterday, I just definitely wasn’t prepared.”

That’s odd because had he paid attention Wednesday when Syndergaard’s arm was barking and he was scratched, should have realized something was going on. Of course, that wouldn’t have taken away the workout, but Harvey could have been more mentally prepared.

Should have, could have, would have can’t turn this thing around for the Mets, who are in desperate need of something to go right.

“We need to be cognizant, when things aren’t going your way, not to go through the motions,” said Jay Bruce, one of the few bright spots for the Mets. “We’re up to the challenge.”

They better be, because 21 games into a season they all believed a World Series was possible, they are looking at that opportunity slipping away.

Apr 27

Syndergaard And Cespedes Go Down

The answer to today’s question, unfortunately, is YES: Something is wrong with the Mets’ Noah Syndergaard. First Wednesday’s, then today’s scheduled starter, was scratched with what manager Terry Collins called a “tired arm,” but technically biceps tendinitis, or possibly something else.

The Mets have until Sunday to figure it out, as that is when they figure is the earliest Syndergaard could next pitch.

“In my opinion, I think it’s very minor, and I’ll get back on the field Sunday,” said Syndergaard, who to the best of my knowledge, doesn’t have a medical degree.

Collins and GM Sandy Alderson don’t have medical degrees, either, yet roll the dice when it comes to dealing with injuries.

“It’s quite obvious we can’t take a chance on him, hurting this guy,” Collins said prior to today’s game, not long after he said, “because I wanted to,” when asked why Syndergaard was scratched Wednesday night. I wrote last night Collins didn’t deserve the benefit of doubt about being given leeway in discussing Mets’ injuries.

That’s based on Collins’ past deceptive and stonewall comments in covering for Alderson’s lack of decisiveness in those types of situations.

Because he’s a pitcher who works every fifth day, the Mets have the luxury of waiting for a few days before putting him on the disabled list

That wasn’t the case with Yoenis Cespedes, whom they kept hoping his strained left hamstring would get better. Based on Cespedes’ injury history, the Mets should have put him on the 10-day disabled list immediately. Instead, they sat him out last weekend’s series against the Nationals, but hoped he could pinch-hit.

They thought the day off and the rainout could buy them some healing time but gambled on him playing Wednesday. He came away from that game but re-pulled his hamstring legging out a double in the fourth inning.

It is clear Cespedes will be out for a long time.

MORE, MUCH MORE, TO FOLLOW

 

Apr 27

Today’s Question: Is Anything Wrong With Syndergaard?

Because “I wanted to,” is not a good explanation from Mets manager Terry Collins for his decision to push back Noah Syndergaard for today and start Robert Gsellman last night.

SYNDERGAARD: Is something wrong with him?(AP)

SYNDERGAARD: Is something wrong with him?(AP)

That begs the question: Why?

That Collins made a fuss over an obvious issue makes me wonder what the Mets are trying to hide. If they aren’t, just answer the question.

“Because I thought Gsellman pitched well in his last start and I wanted to keep him on schedule.” “Because I wanted to take advantage of the rainout and give Syndergaard an extra day because he threw a lot of pitches in his last start.” “Because I wanted to see him go against R.A. Dickey.” “Because my psychic said it would be a good thing.”

All of these could have answered the obvious question without triggering cover-up mode.

Collins has dodged so many issues in the past that he really doesn’t merit the benefit of doubt on something as fuzzy as this.

Syndergaard gave up five runs and is coming off a season-high 114 pitches in his losing start last Thursday against Philadelphia. Maybe he was tired and needed an extra day. Maybe the bone spur that bothered him last season flared up again. Maybe this was GM Sandy Alderson’s order.

Aren’t any of you wondering the same things?

We’ll know soon enough when Syndergaard takes the ball this afternoon.

Apr 26

Is It Time For Mets To Panic?

As devastating as the five-run first inning against Robert Gsellman was to the Mets tonight, let’s not forget their fourth inning against Julio Teheran.

The Mets had the bases loaded with no outs and the best they could muster was a sacrifice fly. That’s it; the game was over right there, and the Mets were on the way of losing, 8-2, to Atlanta.

i-1They have lost five straight and nine of ten, and have three games this weekend in Washington.

Is time to panic?

In a rare display of candor, exasperated Mets manager Terry Collins said: “It could be pretty soon.’’

The first inning was emblematic of what currently ails the Mets. How many times can you say if the Mets don’t homer they won’t score? When the Mets’ pitching goes south as it did for Gsellman tonight, and their defense is horrible – three errors – that’s too big a hole when the offense gets only five hits.

Collins has long said the Mets are built on hitting home runs, but twice this homestand lamented their inability to produce (1-for-5 with RISP and seven runners left on base).

“You know we’re not going to get a lot off Teheran, so that took the air out of the balloon pretty quick,” Collins said of the early hole. “You don’t see any panic in them. We have to stop worrying about home runs and worry about getting some good swings.”

Gsellman said he was told last night he would start, which is contrary to what Collins said. No matter, he had nothing. He explained the problem as mechanical, saying he was flying open with his shoulder that consequently left the ball out over the plate.

Sounds so simple, but why is it so hard to fix? That applies to a lot of things.