Feb 15

Jose Reyes Rips Marlins’ Owner Over Trade

I couldn’t help but laugh out loud when I read the ESPN story about Jose Reyes being angry with Miami Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria for trading him to Toronto.

Mark Buehrle said the same thing after the trade months earlier.

REYES: Sees it from both sides now.

REYES: Sees it from both sides now.

“I was shocked, because Jeffrey Loria, he always told me he’s never going to trade me,’’ Reyes said. “He always called my agent and said, ‘Tell Jose to get a good place here to live.’ ’’

Reyes said he even met with Loria days before the trade and there was no mention of the trade.

Are you tearing up, yet?

Maybe everything Reyes said is true, but wasn’t there a time when he said he wanted to stay with the Mets and finish he career playing next to David Wright? There was also a time when Reyes said he would do what was best for him and the Mets would do what was best for them.

And, after signing a six-year, $106-million contract with the Marlins he never looked back on the Mets. It wasn’t a pleasant divorce for Reyes from the Mets, and also the fans here who greeted him with boos upon his initial return and mostly apathy later in the summer.

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Feb 10

What To Make Of Schilling, Braun And A-Rod

There are several things I want to bring to the blog on a regular basis, something you can depend on. Beginning with a Sunday column centering on the main story of the week.

It is a shame, but the week leading up to the start of spring training was dominated by stories of PEDs. It will never end. There will always be somebody wanting to gain an edge. There will always be cheating. Is it human nature? Yeah, I think so, sadly.

First, Alex Rodriguez. Is anybody really surprised to hear he’s in trouble again? It’s bad enough to be linked again to PEDs, but to come out and say MLB and the Yankees are out to get him? Why not leave well enough alone?

He already hired a big-time lawyer, so he should let his mouthpiece do the talking for him. Sure, the Yankees will try to void his contract, but the MLB Players Association will make it a costly fight. It’s not my money, but if I ran the Yankees I’d go for it, just to send a message.

Rodriguez was not suspended after his admission, so if he’s suspended this time it will be for only 50 games. Bud Selig needs to take that step.

The decision the Yankees must make is whether they believe Rodriguez will ever be healthy enough to be a viable player again. If they decide no, then they might has well try to buy him out or release him outright rather than have him be a distraction for the next five years.

Either way, it could cost them $114 million. And, no way will Rodriguez retire and walk away from that money.

Ryan Braun is proving to be a disappointment and somebody not to be trusted. Yes, he got off on a technicality, but I’m not buying his reasoning his named popped up in the Florida case because he was getting information for his defense. If you’re Braun, you have access to the best lawyers and medical advise available. Why wouldn’t you seek help from a professional instead of going to a shady clinic in a strip mall, one with a checkered history with MLB? If nothing else, wouldn’t the Players Association give him that advice.

Finally, there’s Curt Schilling, who can be a blowhard at times. Including this one. To come out and accuse a member of the Red Sox staff of suggesting he use PEDs while standing in the middle of a crowded clubhouse is absurd.

Although Schilling didn’t mention any names – only that they were no longer with the organization – didn’t mean it couldn’t be figured out who he was talking about. It is highly unlikely, that in a crowded clubhouse, with media access that this would happen. If such a suggestion were made, it would be in private.

 

Jan 30

Yankees Need To Challenge Rodriguez’s Contract

The Yankees, hate them or not, have always set the bar and been the pacesetter.

They must now take a proactive approach with Alex Rodriguez, who is linked to an HGH provider. Rodriguez denies the claim – but lied before – and hired a top-ranked attorney to represent him.

If he’s not guilty, then why the attorney?

If he’s not guilty, then why 16 references to him in documents obtained from the HGH clinic?

The Yankees are on the hook for $114 million over the next five years. Rodriguez has been injured and on a downhill slide for several seasons. To think he’ll rebound into a prolific slugger again is naïve.

Rodriguez admitted using steroids from 2001-2003, but said he never used them with the Yankees or prior to those dates. He had, however, repeatedly denied using them before his confession.

His credibility and believability has long been shot that he’ll never be given the benefit of doubt.

It is easy to say the Yankees made a stupid signing – they should have let him walk when they had the chance – but in fairness they have an argument in claiming they were defrauded.

There seems to be enough evidence to connect Rodriguez to PEDs after his admission. The Yankees extended Rodriguez because they knew the value of him on YES chasing the all-time home run record. In his prime, Rodriguez would have been worth it to them.

However, Rodriguez’s body is breaking down and it isn’t a reach to suggest steroid usage is a contributing factor. If he used HGH while with the Yankees then they aren’t getting the real thing.

That raises an interesting question: What is the real thing with Rodriguez?

We can’t assume it was the Seattle years any longer. We can’t assume it was his early years with the Yankees. I can’t believe it was just a lapse in judgment while in Texas.

What I believe is Rodriguez misled a lot of people, including the Yankees when they signed him. It will be costly, but so is paying off Rodriguez over the next five years and getting nothing.

They must challenge the validity of his contract and attempt to void it, or if nothing else, negotiate a buy out. They need to play hardball.

If they do nothing, Rodriguez will get paid this season (although the Yankees could recoup some of his salary with insurance). Should Rodriguez stay, he will be stung by the booing and it will impact his production. But, he doesn’t care if it doesn’t impact his paycheck.

Through the years the Yankees made several mistakes with Rodriguez. They shouldn’t compound them by not acting now.

Jan 27

Stan Musial And Frank Thomas Recall A Cleaner Time

Today I’d like to respond to two stories from yesterday, neither of them Mets related because, well, they haven’t done anything.

The first is Stan Musial’s funeral and the second Frank Thomas’ comments from the White Sox’s annual fan convention.

In different ways, both speak to baseball’s history in a profound light. Both return us to a cleaner, simpler time.

Let’s look at Musial first. Here was a three-time MVP and seven-time NL batting champion with 3,630 hits fr which 475 were home runs. But, numbers never gave us the true appreciation of this man.

I once saw him in the dining room at old Busch Stadium and thought of introducing myself and shaking his hand, but there was a crowd around him and I didn’t want to intrude. I told one of the Cardinals writers and he said, “You should have, Stan wouldn’t have mind.’’

Reading of his graciousness this week and the thoughtful eulogy from Bob Costas, I have little regret. I’ll always wish I saw him play. Even more, I wish I approached him that day.

One point Costas made was Musial didn’t have a singular achievement, such as Ted Williams hitting .406 and Joe DiMaggio’s 56-game hitting streak. Musial also didn’t have the advantage of playing in a media center sof New York such as Mickey Mantle, Willie Mays and DiMaggio, or chasing a record like Hank Aaron. Timing and location mean a lot, but not everything.

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Jan 20

Baseball Mourns Losses Of Musial And Weaver

The television sound was off, but I didn’t need words to know this was sad news. Why else would there be grainy black-and-white images of Stan Musial unleashing that powerful swing out of an awkward stance?

Musial passed away last night, not long after former Baltimore Orioles manager Earl Weaver died, and the sports world was suddenly without two legends. Despite polar opposites in terms of temperament, both were unique and left an indelible mark on baseball.

MUSIAL: Stan the Man.

Weaver was the fiery manager of the Orioles who built his championship teams with superb starting pitching and the three-run homer. Musial was overshadowed by Ted Williams, Mickey Mantle, Willie Mays and Hank Aaron, but was as lethal with the bat as any of them. Others were more spectacular and played in flashier markets than St. Louis, but Musial personified baseball in his town and throughout middle America.

Having worked in Baltimore covering the Orioles, I learned quickly now woven Weaver was into the fabric of that town, and traveling numerous times to St. Louis, and saw that city embrace Musial to where two statues of him are outside Busch Stadium.

The beauty of baseball is how the sports rolls on with one generation of greatness following the other. However, there are those few who transcend their times and will be remembered through the ages.

There’s sadness in the losses of Weaver and Musial in that they are gone, but also that many of us never got a chance to witness their greatness in person. And for that, we are all the poorer.