May 29

Extra Rest Not A Factor In Harvey Loss

It is now five straight empty starts and counting for the Mets’ Matt Harvey. We can forget about the “dead arm’’ talk, because a pitcher doesn’t have a tired arm when he tops out at 98 mph., and strikes out 11.

Nonetheless, the Mets are taking precautions with Harvey by going to a six-man rotation, and naturally there is a curiosity as to how he will respond with the extra rest, and despite losing 4-3 tonight to Miami, he pitched well enough to win most starts.

HARVEY: Empty again. (AP)

HARVEY: Empty again. (AP)

After missing all of last season following Tommy John surgery, despite winning his first five decisions this season, his issues are maintaining health and refining mechanics.

“I didn’t feel like I was dead,” a clearly dejected Harvey told reporters. “I just kind of got out of my mechanics. … When you have missed a year and you go out there and battle every time, you’re finding out again what your mechanics are doing.

“For me, I think, mechanics-wise it was a lot better this time. We’ve just got to keep that going and really just stay focused on that.”

It’s a positive that he threw eight innings (105 pitches) tonight for the second time in three starts. One walk is also a positive in a bounce-back start from his four-inning, seven-run disaster last weekend in Pittsburgh that followed consecutive no-decisions in which the bullpen coughed up a 1-0 lead in the late innings.

Harvey worked with an extra day of rest and didn’t seem rusty. He was obviously strong and one walk indicated his command was good.

A fourth-inning slider catching too much of the plate that Justin Bour crushed was his biggest mistake, but had nothing to do with the extra rest. It was simply a bad pitch that could have happened anytime. Unfortunately for Harvey, anytime is always bad time when he’s not getting run support.

He responded fine with the extra day. He pitched well enough to win most starts.

 

May 28

Mets’ Six-Man Rotation Proof They Didn’t Get It Right With Harvey Initially

While some are giving the Mets kudos for the inventiveness of going to a six-man rotation, they are doing so to protect Matt Harvey and his surgically-repaired money elbow. More to the point, they are doing it because they didn’t properly calculate a program to monitor his innings in the first pace.

The Mets entered the season with a “play it by ear” approach with Harvey, but it didn’t take long to second-guess several decisions by manager Terry Collins, and yes, to take some jabs at the young star.

HARVEY: The fly in the six-man ointment. (AP)

HARVEY: The fly in the six-man ointment. (AP)

First, they let him pitch with a strep throat, when Collins should have told Harvey to stay home. However, Harvey wanted to pitch that day – of course, he did – and left the impression he wasn’t going to take “no” for an answer, which is to paraphrase Collins.

Starting him was bad enough. Letting him pitch into the seventh that day compounded matters.

When they had a chance to rest Harvey, the Mets spit the bit. Soon it would bite them in the butt.

Entering the season, part of the Mets’ “play it by ear,” plan was to take advantage of one-sided games to give Harvey a few innings off. But, when they could have pulled him after seven in a blowout win over the Yankees, he pushed the envelope because he wanted the complete game.

Collins, of course, caved.

What followed were back-to-back no-decision games for Harvey in which the bullpen coughed up 1-0 leads. Obviously, with benefit if hindsight the Mets would rather have had Harvey pitch longer in those games than stay in for a few more innings in a meaningless game against the Yankees.

Then Harvey was hammered in the worst start of his career and Collins thought he had a “tired arm.”

The goal, said pitching coach Dan Warthen, is to have the pitchers make 30 starts over the course of the year instead of 34.

The fatal flaw to this plan is pitchers are creatures of habit and it is difficult to jump into this format in midstream, a move that has all the pitchers annoyed to some degree.

At the start of spring training, I wrote the Mets should map out Harvey’s starts from April through September with a definitive idea of how many innings he would throw in each start. Well, the Mets didn’t want to do that because they didn’t want to come across as having a leash on Harvey, an idea he despised.

However, in the end it looks as if they will have to do what they should have done in the first place.

There’s a saying the smart carpenter measures twice but saws once. However, the Mets come across as Gilligan trying to build a grass hut.

May 27

Meet Doc Gooden

Just a reminder, New York Mets Report.com is happy to remind you of Dwight Gooden‘s appearance tomorrow evening at Resorts World Casino, 110-00 Rockaway Blvd., Jamaica, beginning at 8 p.m.

General admission is $40 for the event, which includes a Q & A session. A VIP ticket for $100 will entitle you to a meet-and-greet with Gooden where you can obtain autographs.

Regardless of your ticket purchase, you will have a chance to win Mets memorabilia.

For more information, call 718-215-2828.

CLICK HERE TO ORDER TICKETS

 

May 27

May 27, Mets’ Lineup Against Phillies

Here’s the Mets’ lineup for this afternoon’s game at Citi Field against the Phillies:

Curtis Granderson – RF

Juan Lagares – CF

Lucas Duda – 1B

Daniel Murphy – 2B

Michael Cuddyer – LF

Wilmer Flores – SS

Danny Muno – 3B

Kevin Plawecki – C

Noah Syndergaard – RHP

ON DECK: Information on Dwight Gooden appearance.

May 27

Flores Not Mets’ Biggest Flaw

Critics of the Mets, and there are many, are missing the point when it comes to Wilmer Flores. I just read somewhere of a list of the Mets’ biggest flaws, and of course, Flores is right up there as they point to his errors.

FLORES: Comes through in clutch. (AP)

FLORES: Comes through in clutch. (AP)

Unquestionably, Flores is a flawed player, but who isn’t? He’s in the lineup for his bat, plain and simple. That’s it. Nobody expects him to be Ozzie Smith, or Cal Ripken, or Jimmy Rollins in the field. Yes, he has problems with errors, mostly throwing and his range is limited.

But, the Mets knew that going in. Flores is in the lineup because of his hitting potential. Like Daniel Murphy, he’s a player without a natural position and the Mets needed to find a place for him to play. He will improve with more work, playing time and better positioning. He’ll never be Ripken, but he’ll get the job done.

Flores is starting to hit, evidenced by six RBI in his last three games. Last night he tied the game with a sacrifice fly and won it with a single. How many of you were complaining about him then? Or when he hit that homer earlier in the week?

Not many, I presume.

One of the best things manager Terry Collins has done is to not panic when Flores throws one away. Unlike GM Sandy Alderson, who has thrown quite a few verbal daggers at Flores, Collins has stayed the course, which is something I was concerned about before the season started.

“He realizes there’s going to be a day that you’re going to make an error,” Collins told reporters last night. “He’s got to play through that. And I think he’s doing that. You’re starting to see a guy who is going to start swinging the bat like we know he can. He’s going to put up some offensive numbers that people are going to be pretty impressed by.”

In the end, Flores will win more games for the Mets with his bat than he will cost them with his glove.

Sure, I wish he were better defensively, but so does he. Yes, he’s flawed, but he’s not the biggest on a team of flaws.

As a Mets’ fan, I would be less concerned with trying to replace the team’s leading home run hitter, and more concerned with David Wright‘s injury … the bullpen … cracks in the starting rotation … and an overall lack of hitting.

ON DECK: Today’s lineup.