Dec 17

Bringing Back Colon No-Brainer For Mets

The Mets had a handful of decisions to make this off-season, and bringing back Bartolo Colon was no-brainer. Sure, he’s 42, but he also won 14 games, made 31 starts and pitched strong in the playoffs. He won’t make 30 starts in 2016, but even so it is worth it to give him $7.25 million for next year.

The money is worth it for a lot of reasons:

COLON: Worth it. (AP)

COLON: Worth it. (AP)

* He’ll be a reliable stop-gap as the fifth starter to replace Jon Niese until Zack Wheeler is brought up in late June or July. And, if for some reason Wheeler’s return is delayed Colon can always go back into the relation.

* Colon’s work in the bullpen in the playoffs proved valuable and gives the Mets a reliable option as a long reliever.

* Colon is an invaluable asset of information to the Mets’ young core of starters. Even Jacob deGrom, Steven Matz, Noah Syndergaard and even Matt Harvey can learn from him.

* And finally, if he does well until Wheeler comes back, he might be attractive to a contender at the trade deadline. You never know.

The $7.25 million the Mets will give him will be a bargain if he gives him a year they are hoping for.

 

Dec 16

Will Miss Murphy And Gee

Nobody knows where Daniel Murphy will land, but we know it won’t be with the Mets. I haven’t totally discounted him signing with the Yankees. I’m still thinking the Orioles and Angels are strong possibilities.

GEE: Will miss him and Murphy. (AP)

GEE: Will miss him and Murphy. (AP)

Wherever he goes, I will miss him. It was fun watching him during the playoffs and I hope his power display wasn’t a fluke. Murphy played his heart out for the Mets and he deserves his payday. I hope he gets it.

What I’ll remember most about Murphy is how he bounced from position to position before settling in a second base. He wasn’t the second coming of Roberto Alomar, but he worked hard into being a decent fielder. I’ll remember his long at-bats, often resulting in a drive in the gap. And, of course, there were his gaffs on the bases and in the field. One play I’ll always remember was him sliding into third. The third baseman kept his glove on Murphy in the hope he’d move off the bag, but Murphy grabbed the glove and moved it off him. Somehow, I found that funny.

My favorite Murphy moment was him going from first to third on a walk during the playoffs. A heads-up play from a guy whose attention has a tendency to wander.

From a reporter’s perspective, Murphy was great to work with as he didn’t duck any issue and always gave thoughtful answers.

Murphy is gone, but I’ll miss him and wish him well.

The same goes for Dillon Gee, who just signed a minor league deal with Kansas City.

As with Murphy, Gee isn’t physically gifted with those special skills. He wasn’t overpowering, but he was never afraid to take the ball. There were times when he was ripped, but he never offered any excuses. He was always stand up.

Gee had his moments of success despite being a 21-round draft pick. He is 40-37 with a 4.03 ERA lifetime. I thought he got a raw deal from the Mets last year, and with that I knew he was gone.

Both Murphy and Gee played hard and played with heart. I’ll miss them.

 

Dec 15

Mets Should Go After Gordon

We all know the Mets aren’t going to give Yoenis Cespedes the deal he wants, and they shouldn’t. I knew they weren’t going to sign Jason Heyward and Justin Upton won’t happen. The guy I want the Mets to get is Alex Gordon.

GORDON: I want him. (AP)

GORDON: I want him. (AP)

The Royals won’t bring back the three-time All-Star and four-time Gold Glove award winner. Cespedes reportedly wants $125 million over six years. There are reports Gordon could take four years and $16 million to $20 million a year. Nobody knows for sure, but that would be more than reasonable to for a player who finished 12th in the AL MVP voting.

The Mets don’t need a 30-homer guy as much as they do a player who can play defense, is a doubles machine and might give them up to 20 players. Plus, he knows how to win.

Reports have the Tigers and Giants as some of the teams that could be interested. Truth it, this guy knows how to play and would bring a winning attitude and culture into the Mets’ clubhouse. Any club would want a player like him.

Cespedes tore apart the NL for six weeks then faded and did nothing in the postseason. If you could define Cespedes in a few words they would be “streaky awesome.” No question, when he’s hot he sizzles. What he did last August neared historic proportions.

However, the description of Gordon would be “solid and consistent.” That’s exactly what the Mets need and he’s worth the money, especially if they want to keep building with their young pitching staff.

Baseball-Reference.com lists Gordon’s 162-game average as .269 batting average and .348 on-base percentage with 37 doubles, 19 homers, 75 RBI and 12 stolen bases. And, for the new wave statisticians that comes with a .783 OPS.

Now, what team wouldn’t want that?

He can also play some third and first base, and I’m sure being the athlete he is, he could be the center fielder and also hit leadoff.

It’s not cheap to repeat, but he would be worth it.

Dec 14

Wright’s Visit To Doc Reminder Of Key Mets’ Issue

When third baseman David Wright checked in with Dr. Robert Watkins about his back today in Los Angeles – where he spent much of his summer – to come up with a plan on treating his spinal stenosis, it served as a reminder of an underlying issue that will stay with the Mets until he retires.

It should also serve as an emphasis of what they must continue to do this winter.

The acquisition of Neil Walker was a positive because he can back-up Wright if needed and it also allows Wilmer Flores to play some third, but that’s not enough. Consideration should be given to re-signing Kelly Johnson and Juan Uribe, as both proved valuable this summer.

The bottom line is Wright’s health will always be an issue for the remainder of his career. They aren’t going to get Todd Frazier, but they need to pay attention to this issue.

 

Dec 13

Mets Can’t Afford To Stand Pat

The 2006 season ended for the Mets with Carlos Beltran frozen by a wicked Adam Wainwright curveball with the bat on his shoulder. The Mets reasoned with another break or two, they could have won the NLCS that year and advanced to the World Series. Perhaps thinking if the breaks went their way in 2007 they might get to the World Series, the Mets did precious little that winter.

METS: Can't stand pat now.

METS: Can’t stand pat now.

Maintaining the status quo didn’t work out then and the Mets can’t afford to duplicate that thinking this winter.

The Mets upgraded their up-the-middle defense with the additions of Neil Walker and Asdrubal Cabrera, but there is more to be done and this isn’t the time for them to be cautious. Attendance at Citi Field will increase this summer as it usually does after a playoff season, but that shouldn’t alleviate the Mets of their responsibility to put a good team on the field and their response should be to be aggressive.

Their situation in the bullpen and in center field isn’t good enough to win with now, and they have several other questions. Will their sterling rotation stay healthy and continue to progress? Will David Wright remain healthy? Will Lucas Duda be consistent? Will Michael Conforto make the next step?

They’ve already done something to back-up Wright, but Michael Cuddyer‘s retirement and not bringing back Daniel Murphy leaves a gap behind Duda? They must remember Conforto won’t take anybody by surprise this year..

That being said, the bullpen and center field are the main weak links and this is no time to stand pat. Especially since Chicago has improved, as has San Francisco and Arizona. You can also count on the Dodgers and Nationals being aggressive the rest of the winter.

I don’t expect Mets to re-sign Yoenis Cespedes, but there are other options and Kirk Nieuwenhuis shouldn’t be among them. And, expecting Hansel Robles to be a bullpen stud is wishful thinking.

This isn’t the time for the Mets to watch the turnstiles click, because if they think repeating is a given that would be mistake.