Mar 10

Davis’ Saga Continues; This Won’t End Well

Nobody knows what to expect from Ike Davis this season. Not him, not the Mets, but we can speculate, which considering Davis’ history with the media this spring, won’t go over well.

Davis walked into camp this morning in a walking boot on his right foot, something not unfamiliar with him, having done so in 2011 after his collision with David Wright. He was off to a good start at the time, but hasn’t consistently hit since.

DAVIS:  We're all frustrated with Ike. (AP)

DAVIS: We’re all frustrated with Ike. (AP)

Reading Davis’ comments to reporters in Port St. Lucie, did nothing to assure anybody, 1) he will be ready for the start of the season, 2) this is being handled properly, and 3) he has a clue about what it takes to play in New York.

Here we are, three weeks from Opening Day, and the only certainty is Davis won’t get the 90-plus at-bats manager Terry Collins wanted for him.

He just won’t, regardless how he spins things.

“It’s just a walking boot,’’ Davis said matter-of-factly. “Nothing crazy happened. … Hopefully I’ll get two weeks of games in before the season starts. I can still get a lot of ABs.’’

Please explain how.

That comment says he won’t play this week. And, after not playing all this time, don’t think for a moment Davis will jump right in and get four at-bats a day for two weeks. It doesn’t work that way. He’ll be eased in after this week, but then have moments of sitting to make sure he doesn’t re-injure himself.

So, assuming Davis doesn’t play until next Monday – it’s Davis, so bet the over – that might leave him eight or nine games to get ready. At this rate, he might not get 30 at-bats, much less close to the 90 Collins wanted.

Also irritating is Davis saying he hasn’t yet had a MRI. Huh?

“I’m sure we’ll do that at some point,’’ Davis said about the MRI. Davis said his calves are tight, the right being more painful.

What are they waiting for, the traveling MRI show to come to town, much like the traveling carnivals you see throughout the south in mall parking lots this time of year?

First base is an important decision for the Mets, and here it is, halfway through spring training and there’s no clue. None.

Last season, Davis said he didn’t disclose a strained oblique because he was afraid it would come off as making an excuse. His comment this morning was worse.

“I want to play,’’ Davis said, then took a shot at the media, as if the writers forced his bad habits upon him. “Obviously I could have went out there and blown out and dealt with more articles about not saying it’s hurt.’’

C’mon Ike, give it a rest. You’re coming off as being too sensitive to what people say about you. That’s not a good quality to have if you’re a New York athlete.

For those who might have forgotten, Davis hit all of .205 last season with only nine homers and 33 RBI.

His approach at the plate is lost and one of desperation. There’s little patience; the habit of trying to pull everything; a nasty hitch and big loop to his swing; and he pulls his head off the pitch and seemingly refuses to go up the middle or to the opposite field. He’s a big-time mess fundamentally. Last summer’s excursion to Las Vegas accomplished nothing.

My guess is Davis will begin the season on the disabled list and his saga will continue to its inevitable sour end. When that happens, one can only wonder what will be written.

ON DECK: Mets routed by Marlins.

 

 

Mar 08

Harvey Pushes Envelope Again On Twitter; Wants To Pitch This Year

Who wouldn’t like to see Matt Harvey return to the New York Mets this season? Despite words of caution from his doctors, Mets management and even opponents such as Washington’s Stephen Strasburg, Harvey seems bent on wanting to pitch this season.

This morning, Harvey used Twitter and wrote: Harvey day will happen.

HARVEY: Wants to pitch. (Getty)

HARVEY: Wants to pitch. (Getty)

Every time I hear from Harvey about wanting to pitch this year I’m not overwhelmed by excitement as much as I am apprehension as it is never good to force an injury.

Strasburg warned Harvey through the media to take his time in his rehab, and to not look too far into the future. Strasburg said to treat his rehabilitation in chunks, and measure progress not in daily increments because there will be setbacks.

Right now we’re in March and Harvey is throwing four times a week, and off flat ground – currently 20 throws at 60 feet.

The Mets have a rough timetable at best for Harvey, because they’ve accepted the possibility of setbacks. Above all, the next step is contingent on how he responds to the last one.

Meanwhile, Harvey is forecasting what he wants to happen in September, giving the impression he’s oblivious to the rigors and grind of the rehabilitation process.

There are times he appears to pay lip service to this, for example, when he threw for the first time on Feb. 22, he said: “I’ve got a lot of work to do. It’s going to be a tough process [even] with how things felt today. But I’ve got to stick with it and move forward.’’

At the time, Harvey acknowledged his competitive nature and conceded, “I always wanted to push more.’’

When he does that, he fast-forwards months, making him vulnerable to pride and ego.

Don’t think it can’t happen?

Earlier this week, former Met Johan Santana, signed a minor league contract with Baltimore. It was only last spring when Santana disregarded a throwing program the Mets formatted and in a fit, responding to comments made by GM Sandy Alderson, threw off the mound and aggravated his shoulder injury.

He never threw another pitch for the Mets, but did collect all of the $137.5 million owed him.

Santana wasn’t cautious, and let his pride get the better of him. Will the same happen with Harvey? Nobody knows, including Harvey.

If the Mets lay down the law and say Harvey won’t pitch this year regardless, then that might be the thing to do. It would eliminate the risk.

Because, the way it sounds, if left unchecked Harvey might just push the envelope too far and never have the opportunity to sign a $137.5 million contract.

That would be a shame, because it would mean the career we all hope to enjoy will not have come to pass.

 

Mar 07

Mets’ Terry Collins To Use Replay Today

For years, New York Mets manager Terry Collins did not like the concept of instant replay. That changed, and Collins has the opportunity to test the new instant replay system in today’s exhibition game with St. Louis at Port St. Lucie.

COLLINS: Will use replay today. (AP)

COLLINS: Will use replay today. (AP)

“For years and years I never did – I didn’t like the thought of it,’’ Collins told ESPN. “But the technology is so good now and so fast, you’ve got to use it. I mean, there’s too much money involved. One win all of a sudden can make a big difference.’’

Collins plans to have three starting pitchers watch the broadcast feed from the home clubhouse and use a walkie-talkie to notify bench coach Bob Geren on plays that could be challenged. Collins didn’t specify what format the Mets will use to challenge during the season.

Managers will get one challenge during the season. If they use and lose it prior to the seventh inning, they will lose the chance to challenge again. After the seventh, they can appeal the umpires to confer.

There are several flaws in the system, but one method that should be beneficial and fair to all.

In the National Football League, scoring plays and turnovers are automatically reviewed in the press box and reverses are wired to the officials on the field.

Since all games are televised, and because there have been numerous snafus already this spring resulting in delays, the solution appears obvious. Why not have an umpire or MLB official monitoring the game from the press box?

If there’s a close play, that official can immediately buzz the crew chief the play is under review. Then the results can immediately be transmitted down.

This way, there are no such things as challenges. The idea of losing a challenge because you failed on a previous one is absurd.

Taking the challenge from the manager will undoubtedly not hinder the pace of the game because it eliminates the first step of arguing and then challenging.

If the idea is to get the play correct and be fair, this is the best way.

Mar 07

Good Idea To Ease In David Wright

There will be a David Wright sighting this afternoon for the New York Mets. Manager Terry Collins, referring to an oblique strain in previous springs, took the approach of easing Wright and Daniel Murphy into the lineup this spring.

WRIGHT: Easing into it. (AP)

WRIGHT: Easing into it. (AP)

My first impression is Wright doesn’t need to be rushed and if this helps him stay healthy, I’m behind it all the way. Spring training is a grind as it is, so resting is a good strategy since Wright will get the necessary at-bats needed to get ready.

“Spring training is so long. It’s really for the pitchers’ benefit, to get them stretched out,’’ Wright said earlier this week. “Terry approached me even during the offseason and kind of told me, `Don’t be surprised if in spring training I slow you down a little bit and push you back.’

“The last couple of years I’ve had the abdominal/oblique injuries. So to kind of slow it up this year, to kind of take those baby steps before ramping it up, I think helps me out.’’

Hitters normally get close to 90 at-bats in the spring. If they feel like it isn’t enough, they can always be scheduled in simulated games where they can get up to seven in a game. Wright, as he usually does, shows up several weeks earlier. He’s been taking batting practice since the Super Bowl.

“I felt like I got good work in,’’ Wright said. “I felt I’m a lot more prepared now than I have been in recent spring trainings to enter games, and I think I’ll get a little more out of it.’’

Wright’s work entails hitting, defense and conditioning. It’s been a concentrated effort since the games began; an effort he wouldn’t have been able to do had he been playing all this time.

There has been more intense training this spring compared to last year because then he was playing in the World Baseball Classic.

As always, everything is up for review. If, during the season, Wright feels fresher, then this has been a good routine. If he doesn’t feel as sharp at the start of the season, he can always change next year.

Either way, this is a useful experiment.

 

Mar 05

Looking At Mets’ Bullpen; Parnell To Throw Today

Closer Bobby Parnell insists he will be ready for Opening Day, which, if it happens, is good news for the New York Mets. Parnell is scheduled to throw one inning in an intrasquad game today, pitching mostly to David Wright and Daniel Murphy.

If Parnell isn’t ready, Vic Black is first in line to be closer. However, after walking the bases loaded Tuesday, his command is an obvious issue.

PARNELL: To throw today. (AP)

PARNELL: To throw today. (AP)

Assuming a healthy Parnell, the other givens in the bullpen are Black – in a set-up role – lefty Scott Rice and Carlos Torres. That is four relievers in a projected seven-man bullpen.

Torres appears the most versatile, last year working in long relief, as a spot starter and in various match-up situations.

Early in spring training Jose Valverde and Kyle Farnsworth were presumed to be in, but there’s no guarantee they’ll keep both, and it is difficult to say who has the edge.

For the sake of the argument, let’s say only one will make it between Valverde and Farnsworth. That leaves room for two more arms.

One would think Josh Edgin would be a factor as to give the Mets two left-handers.

That makes one more to come from Jeurys Familia, Farnsworth/Valverde and possibly Jenrry Mejia:

Familia: Has loads of potential and can throw hard. However, he hasn’t overwhelmed so far, but it is very early.

Farnsworth/Valverde: Both have outs in their contracts where they can opt to leave if they were not on the major league roster by June. Both could be worth keeping in the hope of them regaining something, and possibly act as a trade chip in July.

Mejia: The Cardinals have been successful in developing some of their power arms by first using them in the bullpen. However, the Mets have bounced Mejia from pen to starter, and he’s had elbow issues. They should think long and hard before sending him to the bullpen, especially since the numbers suggest he’s better as a starter.

While there has been little positive out of the pen to date, there’s still plenty of time. Soon, there won’t be.