Jul 13

Not Expecting Wright Back Any Time Soon, If At All

As much as I would like to see David Wright play again this summer for the Mets, I’m not holding my breath. Neither should you.

On Sunday afternoon, manager Terry Collins said he spoke with Wright that day and he had begun doing some baseball activities. What those activities were, Collins wouldn’t say. Maybe Wright was asked to right the word “baseball” on a blackboard ten times.

However today, GM Sandy Alderson said Wright’s status hasn’t changed and he hasn’t been cleared for baseball activities. The timetable is at least three weeks from the time he is cleared to when he’s able to play again. Of course, that means if there are no setbacks.

It will be three months tomorrow from when Wright last played in a game. He went on the disabled list with a hamstring injury, and while rehabbing it was determined he had spinal stenosis.

Ideally, the Mets would have listened to offers for Daniel Murphy, a free agent whom the Mets aren’t inclined to bring back next season. However, with the Mets legitimate contenders, there’s no way they’ll deal Murphy now.

Meanwhile, when the Mets were in Los Angeles last week Wright said he planned on playing again this season. It’s not looking good.

 

 

 

Jul 12

Nieuwenhuis Powers Mets Into Break On High Note

The Mets couldn’t have asked for a better April, and couldn’t have had a better stretch heading into the All-Star break. After losing their first two games of the month to the Cubs, with their sweep of the Diamondbacks completed today the Mets cruised into the break by winning three straight series.

Who saw that coming?

NIEUWENHUIS: Who would have guessed this? (AP)

NIEUWENHUIS: Who would have guessed this? (AP)

They did it with stellar starting pitching, and believe it or not, another barrage of power. Today, it was Kirk Nieuwenhuis hitting three homers. In the first two games of the series Lucas Duda found his homer stroke.

The Mets enter the break in second place, two games behind Washington and five games over .500. I would have signed on for that in a heartbeat coming out of spring training, and I’m sure most of you would have done so also.

There are two schools of thought about the Mets’ situation heading into the second half:

1) The Mets are where they are for the most part without David Wright, little offensive production overall and an erratic first-half from Matt Harvey. Given that, the Mets are right there and should go for it by making a bold trade.

2) Since they are close, they should keep the status quo and hope for Wright and Travis d’Arnaud to come back.

Can you guess which option GM Sandy Alderson is most apt to take?

Alderson is taking a “wait and see,’’ tact regarding trades, saying the market hasn’t yet defined itself. Entering the break, there are 12 teams that are seven games or less out of first place. Subsequently, there are 12 teams – plus the six division leaders – who believe they are in contention, and that includes the Mets.

The Mets are close, but not in the money if the playoffs started coming out of the break.

By extension, these teams are considered buyers at the deadline. But, are they really? With more and more teams trying to hold out for more – and teams such the Mets who are prone to want to fleece the opposition – there could be limited activity at the end of the month.

I’m expecting the Mets not to do anything substantial at the deadline, but that would be a mistake. The Mets are close despite a myriad of injuries, but also because Washington has been crippled and not played well.

Injuries are always a wild card and we don’t know what to expect next season. Will Washington be healthy? What key Met could be injured? Will the Braves be better? We don’t know. We do know the Mets are this close in large part because they won 11 straight games in April. They can’t count on that again.

I think Alderson should go for it, because we never know what will happen in the future.

 

Jul 11

Harvey Pitches, And Hits, Above Expectations

If Matt Harvey keeps having more days like today he could buy his own jet … even afford to take a helicopter from his Manhattan apartment to Mets’ games.

HARVEY: Plays like a star. (AP)

HARVEY: Plays like a star. (AP)

Harvey had one of those games like in high school, where he struck out nine Arizona Diamondbacks and hit a two-run homer in the Mets’ 4-2 victory.

It was a strong effort in a frustratingly erratic first-half for Harvey.

“For me, flushing the first half and going back out the second half with a fresh start is something I’m looking forward to,’’ Harvey told reporters. “There were ups and downs obviously – after the hot start, more ups and downs than I expected or wanted.’’

Harvey finished the first half with an 8-6 record, but the most important number were his 111.1 innings. He’s on pace for 205 innings, which is more than what GM Sandy Alderson wanted. But, that doesn’t include the playoffs, which is the ultimate goal.

Can you imagine the outcry should the Mets actually make it, but have to shut down Harvey. You think he complains now? That’s why the innings Harvey needlessly pitched in April when the Mets blew chances to rest him can’t be overlooked.

Of course this puts the six-man rotation issue back into the forefront. With Steven Matz down for at least five weeks – don’t forget he’ll have to go on a minor league rehab assignment when he’s cleared – the Mets must decide whether they’ll use Logan Verrett or Dillon Gee for the sixth spot or scrap their innings limitations.

It wasn’t a good start for Harvey, who walked four, but settled into a groove to with his eighth game. It was an effort the Mets have been waiting a long time to see.

Harvey has thrown hard this year coming off Tommy John surgery, but what usually happens in the first season back from the procedure is a lack of command.

That manifests itself not only in walks – nine in his last two starts – but also in home runs allowed.

He gave up a two-run homer to David Peralta in the first inning, but regrouped.

“I really wanted to do everything I could to keep the team within striking distance,’’ Harvey said. “When you look up at the scoreboard and it’s 2-0 and you only faced two batters, the last thing you want to do is keep that rolling. I really just had to buckle down and try to pound the zone as much as possible.’’

Which he did, marvelously so.

 

Jul 10

Mets Mess With Matz; Lefty Out At Least Three Weeks

In what some might describe as “typical Mets,’’ in their handling of injuries, the tightness in Steven Matz’s shoulder went from nothing serious, to a partially torn lat tear that would sideline him for up to three weeks, and today, according to GM Sandy Alderson, an indefinite period.

That doesn’t necessarily translate into “see you in spring training,’’ but then again it might.

MATZ: Out at least three weeks. (AP)

MATZ: Out at least three weeks. (AP)

Matz, who won his first two career starts, will be re-examined in three weeks. He will resume throwing if the lat muscle has healed, but if not will continue to rest. That’s where the indefinite period comes in.

Alderson had no explanation as to why Matz was not held out from last Sunday’s start in Los Angeles other than to say all pitchers have some degree of stiffness. That’s not a good answer, especially in light of previous Mets’ injuries.

The Mets dragged their feet before learning of Matt Harvey’s elbow injury, and considering Matz already had Tommy John surgery, not getting an MRI after his first start was a mistake. Alderson’s reasoning why Matz didn’t get the exam doesn’t wash.

“It was assessed by himself [Matz, who to my knowledge isn’t a doctor] as well as based on the information by the doctors as a mild issue at that time,” Alderson said. “If we got an MRI on every pitcher who ever had any sort of mild pain, we’d probably be getting them on a daily or somewhat frequent basis.”

Perhaps, then again Harvey’s issue might have been caught sooner. The same for Matz.

If Matz is one of the Mets’ pitching jewels, you take care of him. As with what happened with Harvey, it leaves a foul taste.

Three weeks puts us at the trade deadline, which means there is no way Jon Niese will be moved now. The same can pretty much be said for Bartolo Colon. Dillon Gee? Well, he’s always available.

Alderson did an about-face when the topic of trading from their pitching depth was raised. To be sure, Harvey, Jacob deGrom, Noah Syndergaard and Matz were never going anywhere. However, it had always been known Niese, Colon and Gee – currently in the minor leagues – could be had.

“There’s some speculation we were looking to trade pitching, and therefore this loss makes that less likely,’’ Alderson said. “I don’t think it was ever likely we were going to trade out of that six-man group. … I don’t think that will change our level of aggressiveness. We’re two games over and still in the hunt. … Two weeks ago we didn’t have Steven. It won’t make us less aggressive.’’

The cynic in me says it can’t make the Mets any less aggressive because they aren’t doing anything now. In all fairness, we don’t know everybody Alderson is talking to, but since he won’t deal pitching, and the Mets have little in the minor leagues to offer and are reluctant to take on salary, it’s not hard to surmise there will be no fireworks at the trade deadline.

Jul 10

Matt Harvey Misses The Point … Again

Trust me, I don’t hate the Mets’ Matt Harvey. It’s just he does and say things making it hard to like him or give him the benefit of doubt at times.

On the Mets’ West Coast trip, Harvey rented a private jet to go to the Post Ranch Inn resort located in Big Sur, Calif. To break away from the team on a road trip, Harvey needed permission from Terry Collins, the manager he undercut last Saturday when he moaned about the six-man rotation.

While on the jet, Harvey posted a photo of him to Instagram. It’s his money, and he can do with it what he wants. However, instead of staying with the team and trying to come up with a solution on what to do with that extra day, Harvey thought it would be a good idea to go big time as, “superstars’’ sometimes like to do.

Only, Harvey is no superstar. Harvey seemingly forgets he has a lifetime 19-16 record, which isn’t exactly superstar stuff. He is, 19-16 lifetime, so spare me the indignation of your comments telling me Harvey is the Mets’ future. We don’t really know that, but we can guess he’ll bolt the Mets when he becomes a free agent.

Does anybody really believe Harvey won’t listen to a pitch from the Yankees.

When you go on social media to boast living the high life when you’re only 7-6 this year, you take the risk of getting roasted, which is what happened.

Not getting it, the thin-skinned Harvey took to Instagram again to post another photo of himself landing in New York on the Mets’ charter, with this message: “Just landed back in NYC on `THE TEAM FLIGHT’ WITH THE TEAM.’’

Harvey, don’t forget, had a photo of himself coming out of Tommy John surgery flipping the bird to his critics. Then, to emphasize his disdain for his critics – which are growing – by having a snow globe of an extended middle finger in his locker. Total class. Can you in your wildest dreams ever think Tom Seaver would have done anything remotely arrogant?

No, I don’t hate Harvey, but right now he’s awfully difficult to like. It’s not my responsibility to be Harvey’s cheerleader. There are enough of you out there who swallow his arrogance to do that. My responsibility to you is to call it as I see it and this is what I see.

If don’t agree, I can live with that.