Sep 20

Montero Falters Again

There was a stretch in August when Rafael Montero was one of the few Mets worth watching and it looked as if he was pitching for a 2018 rotation spot. However, September brought us back to the old Montero.

Montero struggled again in today’s 9-2 loss in Miami, and with it he’s been off in three of his last four starts.

Perhaps August earned Montero an opportunity to compete next spring, but if his final starts this season continue like his most recent, then he’ll have a short leash.

Montero isn’t challenging hitters on the inner half of the plate as he did in August, and more importantly he’s not limiting the damage and putting away innings.

Today he left after four innings, giving up five runs on seven hits boosting his ERA to 6.16 for this month.
The Montero we saw in August was worth watching. Today’s Montero, not so much.

Sep 18

Is Harvey’s Career With Mets Coming To An End?

Matt Harvey was hit hard again tonight, but the Mets aren’t entertaining any thoughts of pulling the plug on his redemption tour and starting fresh in the spring.

As of now, Harvey will take his 6.59 and rising ERA to the mound at least two more times.

HARVEY: Hammered again. (AP)

HARVEY: Hammered again. (AP)

“When somebody tells me why he shouldn’t, we’ll consider it,’’ manager Terry Collins said when asked if the Mets should think about shutting Harvey down. “What do we have to lose?”

Collins said Harvey was effective in the first two innings – despite falling behind 1-0 in the first – “but in the third inning he lost command of his stuff.’’

In particular, Harvey’s slider had no bite, and drifted over the plate and right into Giancarlo Stanton’s wheelhouse, where he crushed it some 450 feet for a monstrous three-run homer that broke open the game.

“Everything,’’ Harvey said when asked what wasn’t working. “It’s embarrassing. Everybody is watching. It’s terrible. There’s nothing to say. Nothing is good.’’

Even so, Harvey doesn’t want to shut it down.

“No,’’ he said. “This is my job. I have to keep going and try to get better.’’

Sometimes an ERA can be misleading, but not in Harvey’s case. In 14.1 innings since coming off the disabled list, Harvey has given up 21 runs on 32 hits. Overall this year, he has a 1.67 WHIP, so he’s been stinking up the place with the new analytics, too.

Amazingly, hitters are batting .290 against him, some 53 points higher than his career average.

I can see why Harvey wants to make his final two starts. But, will they be his final two starts as a Met?

Sep 17

Gsellman Has Positive Audition For 2018

Today, he was the good Robert Gsellman. The Mets will take every start what they got from Gsellman – one unearned run in seven innings – but unfortunately for both parties, he has only provided glimpses of today’s production every other start at best.

“Just trying to finish strong for these guys so we can have some good momentum heading into next spring,’’ Gsellman told reporters after the Mets’ 5-1 victory over the Braves. “Just trying to keep it rolling.’’

GSELLMAN: Makes 2018 statement. (AP)

GSELLMAN: Makes 2018 statement. (AP)

Gsellman, like Seth Lugo, came up at midseason in 2016 and joined an injury-ravaged rotation to pitch the Mets into the playoffs. However, because of the combination of injuries and poor performance, neither have pitched to expectations, or even to where they have defined roles heading into spring training.

Gsellman should get another two starts, and if he duplicates today’s production, he would have to be considered for a rotation spot. In addition to his line, Gsellman did two things that were positive. The first was going seven innings because length defines a starter.

The second, and this was the most important thing I took from the game, came in the seventh after a pair of Amed Rosario errors, when he pitched out of it with only one run against him. When a starter can limit damage him that late in the game when he’s getting tired, that’s about as positive as you can get.

“I thought I worked well out of it,” Gsellman said. “I tried to pick up Rosario. We all make mistakes.”

As of now, Jacob deGrom, who beat the Braves Saturday, is the only given in next season’s rotation. Noah Syndergaard’s rehab took another step backward and the Mets don’t know if he’ll get into a game this season. Matt Harvey has been hit hard in his rehab games. Harvey lost two of his three starts this month with a 12.19 ERA and 20 hits allowed.

Steven Matz and Zack Wheeler won’t pitch again until next spring. Rafael Montero took the loss, but pitched well Friday against the Braves.

So, in looking at next year, deGrom is the only answered question. Gsellman and Montero pitched well this weekend to make their cases for next season, but nothing definitive.

Sep 15

How Can You Not Be Happy For Bruce?

I channel surfed during Mets-Cubs last night to Indians-Royals. I love that history is being made in Cleveland, my hometown, and was especially happy to see Jay Bruce drove in the game-winner. After what he went through last season, and how he rebounded this year, how can you not cheer for a guy like that?

BRUCE: Happy for him. (AP)

                        BRUCE: Happy for him. (AP)

Meanwhile, the Mets remain rudderless, with no viable veteran presence.

Unless the money is so overwhelming, why would Bruce want to come back to the Mets? Seriously, if I’m Bruce, I know I already have enough money to live comfortably for the rest of my life. If the Indians make a viable offer, I’d stay in Cleveland rather than come back to the toxic atmosphere permeating around the Mets.

We can assume manager Terry Collins won’t be coming back, and with him will likely go the coaching staff. What will be constant is probably GM Sandy Alderson and his penny-pinching ways.

We can assume Michael Conforto won’t be ready for Opening Day, and possibly the same applies to Yoenis Cespedes. Alderson is already on record saying don’t expect an increase in salary, so Bruce would probably get a low-ball offer, and if he’s crazy enough to take it, he won’t be getting much help.

Why would he put himself through that again?

Alderson says he expects the Mets to compete next season, predicated of course, on their young pitching. But, Jacob deGrom is the ace, but with only 14 wins. Matt Harveys rehab is three starts – one good; two bad – and after losing to the Cubs Wednesday he said there’s been nothing positive. It sounds like he defeated mentally.

As far as Noah Syndergaard is concerned, I’m happy he’s dating a supermodel, but his rehab has stalled. He’s playing catch now, but nobody can say for sure when he’ll get in a game. So, like Harvey, Syndergaard is a question. So are Zack Wheeler and Steven Matz. Seth Lugo, hammered last night and Robert Gsellman, torched in the series opener, regressed to where they’ll go into spring training with no defined roles.

Catcher, the entire infield save shortstop, and at least one outfield position are up for grabs next season. So, I ask you, unless Alderson blows him away with an offer – and we know that won’t happen – why would Bruce even think of coming back here?

 

Sep 15

Mr Met: Entertaining and Delighting Fans Since 1963

mr_met

Tell the unknowing that a guy with a giant baseball head, cartoonish nose, and goofy wide smile is one of the most beloved characters in sports history and you’re bound to get a reaction of disbelief.

But such a claim holds true for Mr. Met, the long time mascot of the New York Mets.

The simple truth is that Mr. Met is sure to make you smile whether you’re a diehard Mets fan, a casual fan, or are just human with a charitable nature.

As an early pioneer of team mascots, the humble beginnings of the Mr. Met character date back a full decade or more before most MLB teams adopted costumed characters to amuse fans.  While it’s quite expected these days to see mascots engaging with fans at the ballpark, they all owe a debt to the groundbreaking Mr. Met.

He originally existed in animated form when he graced the cover of the Mets programs, scorecards, and yearbooks during the 1963 season.  Several artists, including acclaimed comic book illustrator Al Avison, contributed to the concept and design of Mr. Met.

The team moved stadiums from the Polo Grounds to Shea Stadium in 1964, an occasion enhanced by the debut of Mr. Met as a live mascot.

Mr. Met graced Mets games and promotional material until 1976, when he was phased out of appearance.  Presumably, he retired and was playing golf in Florida, although this has never been confirmed.

Passionate fan appeal sparked the Mets to reintroduce Mr. Met in 1994, and he has been rightfully entertaining the masses at Shea Stadium and Citi Field ever since.

In addition to being a fixture at the ballpark on his own, Mr. Met is a devoted husband, occasionally bringing his lovely wife Mrs. Met along to the games.

Mr. Met’s unwavering support for the Amazin’s through thick and thin is an inspiration to every fan, especially in down seasons like the current. The crosstown fans might peruse the lines on BetStars any given day and see the Yankees as 4/6 favorites over the Twins.  As the Mets faithful, we haven’t had that luxury often in 2017.

So while he has always worn the hat of his favorite baseball team, Mr. Met has worn many figurative hats throughout his career.  Off the field, he has been a cheerleader, a fundraiser, a marketer, and even a hired wedding guest.

Of course, Mr. Met is a man of giving back to communities.  He has appeared at numerous charity events over the years.  Everywhere Mr. Met goes he’s met with smiles and hugs, and the inevitable questions about his baseball head and toothless grin.

Beyond his role as the stellar ambassador of the Mets organization, Mr. Met is a savvy advertiser for anyone who will call him up for a commercial.  He has appeared in several spots for ESPN in their fan favorite This is SportsCenter ad campaign, as well lending his red stitched face to Sony PlayStation and MTA New York City Transit.

Mr. Met played himself in a 2016 episode of the CBS sitcom The Odd Couple.  Not that he could possibly be anyone else.

A noteworthy career of entertaining and delighting fans across the world doesn’t go unrecognized.  The Mascot Hall of Fame inducted Mr. Met in 2007, where he joined the Phillie Phantic of the Philadelphia Phillies to became only the second MLB mascot honored by the organization.  In 2012, Forbes magazine heralded Mr. Met as number one on a list of America’s favorite sports mascots.

Mr. Met has enlivened Mets fans and beyond for more than 50 years. In that time, multiple generations have grown up enjoying his jovial personality and zany antics at the ballpark.  We tip our caps to you, Mr. Met.  May you keep us young at heart for another 50 years.