May 06

Rushing Wright Would Be Wrong

The Mets would be wrong to rush David Wright off the disabled list. Manager Terry Collins said Wright’s pulled right hamstring is making gradual progress, and the projection is he could get into a minor league rehab game this weekend and activated next week.

“He’s starting to speed things up, which is a good sign,” Collins told reporters at Citi Field.

WRIGHT: Take it easy. (AP)

WRIGHT: Take it easy. (AP)

Sounds good, but haven’t we heard similar projections from the Mets over the years, and this includes on Wright?

Thank you, but no.

I would rather wait and see Wright the following week if it means having him intact for the remainder of the season. Hamstrings are an extremely tricky and unpredictable injury. Wright not only has to stretch out the hamstring, but test it running, with start-and-stop moves and changing directions while running.

The conventional wisdom on hamstring injuries is – and remember when this first happened the prognosis was a tight hamstring – whatever the original timeframe simply add a week.

Sure, I would like to see Wright out next week. Hell, I wanted to see him a week ago. But, what I don’t want is to see him hurt again.

No need to rush.

May 05

Let’s Knock It Off With Mets And Tulowitzki

One more time: Troy Tulowitzki won’t be coming to the Mets? Not now, and probably not ever. The recent two-game benching of Wilmer Flores brought the predictable “the Mets need to get Tulowitzki” columns and calls on the call-in shows.

They could have gotten Tulowitzki a long time ago if they caved to the Rockies’ demands for either Steven Matz or Noah Syndergaard, and another prospect. There would also be the matter of being willing to pay the $115-plus million remaining on Tulowitzki’s contract. And, on more thing, the Mets would have to be willing to gamble with his recent injury history.

TULOWITZKI: Get off Fantasy Island. (AP)

TULOWITZKI: Get off Fantasy Island. (AP)

We all know the Mets’ thinking on giving up their young pitching; paying huge salaries and trading for players with tainted backgrounds.

With Bartolo Colon, Dillon Gee and possibly Jon Niese probably not coming back next year, and Zack Wheeler not being ready until June if not later, it stands to reason the Mets will need Syndergaard or Matz. They aren’t going anywhere.

Also, the Mets remain out front with their desires to cut salary evidenced by trade speculation surrounding Gee and Daniel Murphy. They certainly aren’t going to take on Tulowitzki’s contract.

The talented columnist Ken Davidoff mentioned Tulowitzki in a column today, but was upfront saying the Mets could get him if they wanted to cave. I’m thinking he mentioned him to citing the obvious as opposed to really believing they should go after him.

He also mentioned several other shortstops they could get, but only after paying a hefty price, including Alexei Ramirez (White Sox), Asdrubal Cabrera (Tampa Bay), Starlin Castro (Cubs) and Jimmy Rollins (Dodgers).

Cabrera and Rollins play for teams that could compete, so you have to wonder why they would want to deal them. Any of those four would be pricey.

My preference is to give Flores the opportunity to prove he can play. His defense has been atrocious and directly responsible for one loss at least, and possibly, two. I’m not convinced he can’t turn it around and hope he gets the chance.

Will he make it?

I honestly don’t know, but neither does anybody else, either, including the Mets.

What I do know is the Mets will regret it if they get fleeced in trades for any of these guys, especially Tulowitzki.

May 05

We Are About To Learn What Mets Are Made Of

It’s not about the “blips,’’ for the New York Mets, it’s about how they rebound from them that will tell the story of this season. Beginning tonight, we shall see what the Mets are really made of as they have lost three straight series after their 11-game winning streak.

ALDERSON: A lot of thinking to do. (AP)

ALDERSON: A lot of thinking to do. (AP)

Most frustrating is with the exception of the first games of their series against the Yankees and Nationals, they lost five games by a composite nine runs, three of them by one run, including the last two by 1-0 scores.

When manager Terry Collins said there would be “blips,’’ and wasn’t lying.

When the Mets were winning 11 straight there were comments about their strength of schedule. Since the Yankees and Nationals righted their collective ships, the Mets have lost seven of ten games; they have gone from the best record in the majors to the seventh best; and their eight-game lead over Washington has been trimmed from eight to 3.5 games.

However, this isn’t the NCAA Tournament, overall strength of schedule isn’t the issue. The issue is winning your schedule.

What their winning streak accomplished was to buy time to take such a hit, and there is no mistaking the Mets were clipped big time and so far they’ve won at a clip that could get them into the playoffs.

That the Mets stayed close in games was a tribute to their overall strong pitching and a few players hitting in the clutch.

However, this stumble exposed the following: 1) Jacob deGrom must make some adjustments to his game; 2) they miss David Wright; 3) the defense is shaky up the middle; 4) there’s an overall lack of power from Curtis Granderson and Lucas Duda; and 5) their overall clutch hitting has been poor.

Collins said there “would be no panic,’’ but signs of panic always come first from management in the form of benching and/or trading players and other roster moves that suggest an overhaul.

* Wilmer Flores was told he has a long leash, but sat the last two games. Whether or not he plays against the Orioles could determine a lot.

* There have long been rumors of trading Daniel Murphy and Dillon Gee, and the Giants have been scouting the former. What’s happening there? Do you trade Murphy while you’re still in first place?

* Eric Campbell replaced Wright, but was subsequently benched for not hitting. In the process Dilson Herrera was promoted from Triple-A Las Vegas to play second and Murphy went to third. This was done to showcase Murphy at third, but Herrera isn’t hitting, so what will they do? Wright’s return is far from imminent.

There are a lot of moving parts for the Mets now and how GM Sandy Alderson and Collins respond will go a long way to determine the success of this season. If they panic, that winning streak will be a memory.

May 04

Are Mets Too Eager To Deal Murphy And Gee?

Scouts were in town over the weekend to watch the Mets Daniel Murphy for the purpose of trading for the third baseman. Specifically the Giants, who didn’t bring back Pablo Sandoval last winter, have the most interest.

The Mets really aren’t in a good position when it comes to possibly trading Murphy because there’s little doubt they will bring him back next year. Given that, unless there’s a line out the door of suitors for Murphy, the Giants probably won’t have to come up with a big package.

Under the Sandy Alderson era, the Mets have traditionally asked for too much in the trade market, and the same might happen again if it were solely about Murphy. What the Mets might think about doing is making that package include Dillon Gee, whom they are also eager to deal.

This could work because the Giants have pitching depth issues and need another arm.

While it is easy to understand why San Francisco, which is having a down year, might want Murphy and Gee, the motivation for the Mets to deal one or both is to clear salary and make room for younger talent. However, if the Mets are to be the contender they hope to be this season they will be gambling their young talent of infielder Dilson Herrera and possibly Noah Syndergaard will adjust to the demands of the major leagues and be able to immediately give them what Gee and Murphy can.

The Mets want to get something for Murphy and Gee before they leave, which is understandable. But, I would rather the Mets make the playoffs and they walk and get nothing, than dealing them now and missing October.

Seems to me the Mets are too eager to get rid of them.

 

 

May 03

We Will Know Mets’ True Feelings About Flores On Tuesday

It is a measure of how current GM Sandy Alderson – and the Mets’ brass in previous years – mislead fans that some of us are skeptical of the explanation given for the recent benching of shortstop Wilmer Flores.

FLORES: Resting again. (Getty)

FLORES: Resting again. (Getty)

It was no secret the Mets tried to obtain a shortstop during the winter, and several times Alderson cracked wise at Flores’ expense. Even when circumstances dictated Flores would be the Opening Day starter – primarily because they had less faith in Ruben Tejada – the Mets were reluctant to make the announcement.

After Flores committed an error which helped beat Jacob deGrom Thursday and his seventh the next night behind Matt Harvey, manager Terry Collins said he would rest the shortstop Saturday. Collins said it was his plan all along to Tejada a day. At the time, Collins said if he pulled Flores now it could destroy his confidence and he could never return to shortstop.

Alderson said: “We know he can catch the ball. The important thing right now is to make sure he understands we have confidence in his ability to catch the ball. He’s demonstrated it. This is not a hope and a prayer. He’s demonstrated it in the past. We know what limitations may exist at that position for him. This is not one of them — or shouldn’t be one of them. The short answer is: Yes, he’s got plenty of room.”

Collins emphasized his confidence: “You’ve got to give him a chance. You’ve got to give him a legitimate chance. … If this kid is going to be a big league player, he’s got to be able to get through some of these times. And therefore the leash has got to be long.”

Flores wasn’t in the lineup Sunday, which makes sense because coupled with Monday’s off day that would give him three straight days in which to clear his head.

However, what can we make of it if Flores isn’t in the lineup Tuesday against the Orioles?