Sep 16

Three Mets’ Storylines: Pushing It With DeGrom?

In announcing Jacob deGrom‘s return to the Mets’ rotation, manager Terry Collins said he’ll have a pitch count ceiling of 75 and the expectations are minimal. Again, it appears the Mets’ plan is built on hope, which smacks of pushing the envelope too far.

COLON: Terrific again. (AP)

COLON: Terrific again. (AP)

Collins said he’d like to get deGrom three starts prior to the playoffs, but what’s wrong with more rehab work and two starts?

“Our expectations right now are to kind of build him back up a little bit,” Collins said prior to the Mets’ 3-0 victory over Minnesota. “I think he will dictate a lot by how he feels. We certainly think he’s going to be fine, but we don’t have a crystal ball here to know what’s going to happen after he throws Sunday.”

Building him back up means he not there, yet.

I always fall on the side of caution when it comes to a pitcher’s injury because too often things backfire when he’s rushed back. The Mets have been lucky so far with Noah Syndergaard‘s elbow bone spur, but we still don’t know what will happen this winter.

We’ve seen the Mets get bit with Matt Harvey and Steven Matz. The Mets have too much to play for to just be hoping for the best with deGrom. Give him some more time. He’s worth the wait.

The Mets’ other storylines Friday were Bartolo Colon and back-to-back power.

COLON TERRIFIC AGAIN: With deGrom and Matz injured, Colon has helped carried the Mets, going 5-1 (14 earned runs in 57 innings) in nine starts since Aug. 1.

“With all that’s happened with our rotation, I don’t know where we’d be without him,” Collins said.

Colon was terrific, giving up three hits in seven scoreless innings, throwing an economical 94 pitches in the process as he improved to a team-high 14-7 while lowering his ERA to 3.14.

For the 43-year-old Colon, it is his 40th start that he’s given up one run or less since turning 40. Amazing. The victory was the 232nd of his career.

Colon could get three more starts this year, including the season finale.

POWER PLUS: Jose Reyes and Asdrubal Cabrera hit back-to-back solo homers in the fourth, the 11th time this year they’ve done so.

Collins said Reyes had hit for more power (seven homers) than what he anticipated. Tonight’s homer was Reyes’ fourth in 31 games since coming off the disabled list.

Cabrera has been on a tear in 26 games since coming off the disabled list with seven homers and 16 RBI. He was named the NL Player of the Week for Aug. 22-28.

The Mets have hit 199 homers, one shy of the franchise record established in 2006.

Of the Mets’ 579 runs, over 53 percent have been accounted for by home runs.

EXTRA INNINGS: Cabrera left the game in the ninth with a cramp in his right leg (not the one he had surgery on). … Yoenis Cespedes dropped a can-of-corn pop fly on a 100 percent hot dog play. When asked if he’d talk with Cespedes, Collins said, “these things speak for themselves.’’ … Addison Reed registered his 37th hold throwing nine pitches in a 1-2-3 eighth.

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Sep 16

Mets Must Take Advantage Of Schedule

We’ve heard for the past month what an easy schedule the Mets have down the stretch compared to St. Louis and San Francisco.

However, it doesn’t matter how easy the Mets theoretically might have it if they don’t win. With the Cardinals and Giants beating each other this weekend, the Mets have three games with the Twins, who have the worst record in the majors.

“We’re going home in the wild-card hunt,” manager Terry Collins said after the Washington series. “Our fans should be excited. It’s the last homestand. … We caught up a lot in the last couple of weeks. We’ve got ourselves right where we need to be.”

There will be a myriad of reasons to blame if the Mets don’t make it, not the least of which is their record against several of the National League’s cupcakes. They are a combined 17-24 against Colorado (1-6), Arizona (1-5), Philadelphia (6-6), and Atlanta (9-7).

Their combined 2-11 record against the Diamondbacks and Rockies, by itself, could derail the Mets.

Here are the remaining schedules of the Mets, Cardinals and Giants:

Sept. 16: Twins at Mets; Cardinals at Giants.

Sept. 17: Twins at Mets; Cardinals at Giants.

Sept. 18: Twins at Mets; Cardinals at Giants.

Sept. 19: Braves at Mets; Cardinals at Rockies; Giants at Dodgers.

Sept. 20: Braves at Mets; Cardinals at Rockies; Giants at Dodgers.

Sept. 21: Braves at Mets; Cardinals at Rockies; Giants at Dodgers.

Sept. 22: Phillies at Mets; Cardinals OFF; Giants at Padres.

Sept. 23: Phillies at Mets; Cardinals at Cubs; Giants at Padres.

Sept. 24: Phillies at Mets; Cardinals at Cubs; Giants at Padres.

Sept. 25: Phillies at Mets; Cardinals at Cubs; Giants at Padres.

Sept. 26: Mets at Marlins; Reds at Cardinals; Giants OFF.

Sept. 27: Mets at Marlins; Reds at Cardinals; Rockies at Giants.

Sept. 28: Mets at Marlins; Reds at Cardinals; Rockies at Giants.

Sept. 29: Mets OFF; Reds at Cardinals; Rockies at Giants.

Sept. 30: Mets at Phillies; Pirates at Cardinals; Dodgers at Giants.

Oct. 1: Mets at Phillies; Pirates at Cardinals; Dodgers at Giants.

Oct. 2: Mets at Phillies; Pirates at Cardinals; Dodgers at Giants.

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Sep 15

Mets Should Give Verrett Sunday’s Start

The Mets are undecided as to Sunday’s starter against Minnesota, but manager Terry Collins has several options – all of them lacking.

Of their potential choices, rushing Jacob deGrom or Steven Matz – or even splitting a start by using both – is the least appealing in my mind.

VERRETT: My choice for Sunday. (AP)

VERRETT: My choice for Sunday. (AP)

The Mets have to ask this question: If this were May, would they rush them back?

I’m saying no. Under normal circumstances, both would get more rehab time, including a rehab assignment in the minor leagues. However, with the minor league season over, the latter isn’t an option.

As it is, Matz will have surgery to treat the bone spur in his elbow this winter. As much as they want to pitch, and for how badly the Mets – and these players – want to reach the postseason, the last thing they should do is gamble with their health.

Beating the Twins isn’t as important as waiting longer and having them ready for the final two weeks and the postseason. Should they lose Sunday to the Twins and miss the playoffs by a game, well, that’s the risk they’ll have to take.

Is winning worth the risk of deGrom possibly having Tommy John surgery and maybe missing 2017?

What are Collins’ other choices?

* Collins could move up Noah Syndergaard a day, but Collins said he doesn’t want that option. And, let’s not forget Syndergaard also has a bone spur and surgery hasn’t been discounted.

* That turn in the rotation belongs to Rafael Montero. After his last start, Collins immediately said Montero wouldn’t pitch. While, I’m not against that, Collins probably should have waited a day or two before committing to not using Montero. He could go back on his initial decision, but that would make him look bad. Very bad.

* A third option is going back to Logan Verrett, who has pitched well as a spot starter in the past. Verrett was shelled in his last start, Aug. 12 against San Diego, when he gave up eight runs in 2.2 innings. However, he has started 12 of the 33 games in which he’s pitched. Collins has gotten good starts from Verrett in the past, and surely he’d take five innings, something he’s done six times already this year.

* Another option is lefty Sean Gilmartin, who produced as a Rule Five draft pick last year. Gilmartin has one career start for the Mets, and that was last season.

* Gabriel Ynoa is a possibility, but his 15.19 ERA and 2.44 WHIP in six appearances (5.1 innings) is hardly endorsement worthy.

* Collins’ final option is to start either Gilmartin or Montero and using the other as the first reliever out of the pen.

My first option would be Verrett based on experience and previous success in that role. My second choice would be a combination of Verrett, Montero and Gilmartin.

I don’t want to gamble with deGrom and/or Matz, or move Syndergaard. Let’s face it, regardless of whom the Mets start, they should be expected to beat the Twins, who have the worst record in the majors.

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Sep 14

Three Mets’ Storylines: Gsellman Hope For Future, And Present

The Mets got all they could have hoped for this afternoon – and season – from Robert Gsellman. The Mets’ rookie, who along with Seth Lugo kept them in the wild-card race and was again superb Wednesday afternoon.

GSELLMAN: Hope for future, and present. (AP)

GSELLMAN: Hope for future, and present. (AP)

Gsellman threw 5.2 scoreless innings with four strikeouts, but couldn’t overcome his anemic offense in the 1-0 loss to the Washington Nationals.

“We didn’t lose any ground,” was manager Terry Collins’ backwards logic because the National League’s wild-card race remained stagnant because both St. Louis and San Francisco also lost.

“I thought he threw the ball very well,” Collins said. “He threw strikes. He had the sinker working and had worked both sides. He didn’t have anything to work with.”

Gsellman and Lugo weren’t on the Mets’ radar entering the season, but have kept them afloat with Jacob deGrom (forearm) and Steven Matz (shoulder) went on the disabled list.

Their performances should give the Mets a sense of comfort heading into the offseason and next year, but it is somewhat limited considering the myriad of pitching questions they’ll have this winter:

* How well will Matt Harvey recover from his shoulder surgery?

* As well as Lugo and Gsellman have pitched, has their window been open enough to give the Mets a definitive idea of what they can expect in 2017, and in what roles?

* How well will Matz recover from his expected elbow surgery?

* Will Noah Syndergaard’s bone spur require surgery, and if so, how will he recover?

* With all this in mind, will they bring back Bartolo Colon?

While the Mets’ pitching questions for 2017 was a storyline, the others today were their anemic offense and Wilmer Flores’ injury.

ANEMIC OFFENSE: Three hits won’t cut it most games and it didn’t today.

After back-to-back singles from Jose Reyes and Asdrubal Cabrera to open the game against Tanner Roarck, the Mets eventually loaded the bases but came away empty.

The Mets’ only other hit was Jay Bruce’s single in the sixth. He was erased on a double-play and the Mets didn’t have another runner the rest of the game.

FLORES HURTING: Flores hasn’t played since injured in a home plate collision Saturday in Atlanta. Collins assumed responsibility for not running for Flores.

Flores said what is keeping him out isn’t his neck or head, but his right wrist.

“My wrist is bothering me,” Flores said. “I can’t swing the bat. The neck is fine. I could play with the neck. It’s just the wrist.”

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Sep 13

Mets’ Three Storylines: T.J. Rivera Steps Up

Pennant races aren’t just for guys like Yoenis Cespedes and Bryce Harper. They also belong to guys like T.J. Rivera, a undrafted free agent who carried the Mets on this night over their closest rivals.

RIVERA: Blast lifts Mets over Nats. (AP)

RIVERA: Blast lifts Mets over Nats. (AP)

Getting his first start in three weeks, Rivera had three hits including a tenth-inning homer that lifted the Mets over the Nationals, 4-3 in 10 innings, at Nationals Park Tuesday night. The victory, coupled with the Cardinals beating the Cubs in St. Louis, kept the Mets with a half-game lead for the second wild-card (they are even in the loss column).

“Somebody you don’t expect has to step up and tonight it was T.J.,” manager Terry Collins said. “He’s hit everywhere he’s been. He has a simple, short swing.”

In 45 at-bats since joining the Mets, Rivera his hitting .333 with his first career homer and six RBI. He’s also been solid defensively, regardless of where Collins starts him.

“It’s definitely not to hit a home run,” Rivera said of his thinking heading to the plate against Nationals closer Mark Melancon. “I just wanted to put the bat on the ball. When you haven’t been around the team much you want to contribute.”

With Neil Walker out for the season with a back injury and Wilmer Flores currently hurting following a home plate collision Saturday in Atlanta, Rivera should get more opportunities to play. Collins said it was a gut feeling to start Rivera, who won the Triple-A batting title for Las Vegas.

It’s probably a stretch to say Rivera could make the postseason roster, but he’s made enough of an impression to where he can compete for a job next spring.

Rivera was the main storyline, with the others being Noah Syndergaard’s wasted effort and Jerry Blevins picking up for Jeurys Familia.

TOUGH LUCK NOAH: Collins said with the Mets starting their best pitcher, this was a game they had to win. Syndergaard was poised to win his 14th game until Familia blew his fourth save opportunity in the ninth.

Syndergaard gave up one run on four hits with one walk and 10 strikeouts – including his 200th of the season – in one of his best outings of the season. Unlike previous outings where he ran up his pitch count, Syndergaard was extremely pitch efficient throwing 99.

“He was amped up,” Collins said. “He knew we needed to win this game.”

Syndergaard became the second-fastest Met behind Dwight Gooden to reach 200 strikeouts.

BLEVINS PICKS UP FAMILIA:  Familia blew his fourth save opportunity when the Nationals tied it on RBI singles by Anthony Rendon and Wilson Ramos (an infield chopper over Familia’s head).

After Rivera’s drive, the Nationals to tie the game again, but Blevins struck out Daniel Murphy on a wicked curveball to end the game.

It was his first save since 2012.

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