Nov 24

Mets Should Consider Bringing Back Mejia

After testing positive twice for PEDs, conventional reaction was the Mets would cut ties with reliever Jenrry Mejia. I was in that camp at first, but admit to softening my position based on economics and positional need.

MEJIA: Why not? (AP)

MEJIA: Why not? (AP)

Mejia was to make $2.595 million last year before the suspension and will make a prorated portion of that when his suspension ends in late July. In the grand scheme of things that’s not considered a lot for a set-up reliever, which is what the Mets will need if they don’t keep Tyler Clippard.

Mejia was the Mets closer in 2014 and saved 28 games. He was to be a set-up man for Jeurys Familia before the second suspension came down. If the Mets keep him he’ll slot in behind Addison Reed.

The Mets also will have to make decisions on relievers Carlos Torres and Josh Edgin. I think they’ll keep Torres because of his versatility and Edgin because he’s left handed.

With the money not appearing to be a problem and there certainly is a need for bullpen help. It’s worth a gamble.




Nov 23

Not Buying Murphy Return

There were several articles last week claiming the Mets still would attempt to bring back Daniel Murphy, who rejected a $15.8-million qualifying offer. The reports said the Mets would make a sincere run at Murphy, who might bite on an offer that isn’t necessarily the highest.

Nearly everything I’ve read said the Mets might still make an offer because of Murphy’s affection for the team and New York. But, are those really good enough reasons? If that was the case, their decision would be based more on sentimentality than talent.

MURPHY: Still in play for Mets?  (Getty)

MURPHY: Still in play for Mets? (Getty)

The reported market for Murphy is $50 million over four years. The qualifying offer entitles the Mets to a compensatory draft pick plus the right to keep negotiating. It does not signal the Mets’ desire to keep him because they think he’s part of their future.

We don’t know what Murphy is seeking and what the Mets are willing to offer. The only numbers we know of are of the speculative nature.

We also know Murphy is 30 years old, so this will likely be his final shot at the brass ring. I can’t see him leaving money on the table to go back to a team that never had him on the top of their pecking order.

Murphy also hit 14 homers last season and went deep in six consecutive games in the playoffs. What we don’t know, and this includes the Mets, is whether that power surge was a fluke or a sign he’s added that element to his game.

The Mets are also reportedly interested in Kansas City free-agent Ben Zobrist, who is five years older than Murphy, and is a better player who is more versatile. However, the speculated numbers for Zobrist is $60 million over four years.

Zobrist brings more to the table than Murphy, and I think the Mets will shy away because of the price. This might make Murphy more palatable. But, I keep going back to well how Wilmer Flores adjusted to second base and potential of Dilson Herrera.

If those two can adequately fill the void left by Murphy, and I believe Flores can do so, then the Mets should be all right at second base. In that case, the money spent on Murphy or Zobrist, would be better spent adding a center fielder because I’m not sold on Juan Lagares and rebuilding the bullpen.

Nov 22

Mets Likely To Pass On Cespedes

There is no way of knowing for sure, but the Mets likely don’t get to the World Series without Yoenis Cespedes.

He definitely has a “Wow!’’ factor about him evidenced by his 17 homers and 44 RBI in his two months with the Mets. He also has a laser for an arm and an ability to track a ball in center.

CESPEDES:  Don't count on his return. (Getty)

CESPEDES: Don’t count on his return. (Getty)

His agencies – Creative Artists Associates and ROC Nation, run by rapper Jay-Z – put together a 100-page coffee table style book titled “52 Reviews’’ for his uniform number featuring his stats, testimonials and a built-in disc player to highlight his greatest plays.

“It’s not the only piece to the puzzle,’’ said Brodie Van Wagenen, the lead agent in Cespedes’ negotiations, told ESPN that packaging is part of the process. “Most everyone has access to the information, but the way in which you sort the information and tell the story and define the player is an art form that’s unique from agent to agent. It’s not just the packaging.

“I think this book highlights and reminds teams of what Yoenis Cespedes’ rare skill set is. Instead of his agents telling people how good he is, teams can see it for themselves and hear it from unbiased, third-party insiders.’’

Potential suitors won’t see Cespedes’ “Oh No,” moments, such as his botched play in the outfield that lead to an inside-the-park homer, or those teams when he wasn’t always compelled to run out ground balls, or all those swings-and-misses (39 percent of the time) and .319 on-base percentage.

The Mets will make an offer – believed to be of a public relations variety – and there are a handful of other teams needing an outfielder. But, how many of them are willing to offer the six years and $150 million Cespedes’ camp is reportedly seeking?

San Francisco is intriguing, while the Angels, Cardinals, Cubs and Rangers have shown a willingness to spend. The Tigers need an outfielder, but will they go that way again?

Baltimore, Kansas City, Minnesota, Cleveland, San Diego, Cincinnati and Seattle need outfield help, but don’t have a reputation to write checks.

In the case of the Mariners, they won’t do anything unless they can get rid of Robinson Cano’s huge mistake of a contract.

None of these teams are likely to be seduced by the glitter of “52 Reviews.’’ They know all of Cespedes’ pertinent numbers, including his .150 batting average in the World Series and playing with four different teams in his four-year career.

Oh yes, $150 million will also be a telling number.

Nov 20

Mets Should Pass On Desmond

Nobody can say what the Mets will do this winter, but this much is a certainty: Signing Ian Desmond in no way represents an upgrade by any stretch of the imagination. Desmond made $11 million last year for the Washington Nationals and will undoubtedly want more in the first of what will be a multi-year deal.

Only a fool would give in to Desmond’s demands.

DESMOND: Just say no. (Getty)

DESMOND: Just say no. (Getty)

The Mets seem determined to replace Wilmer Flores as their shortstop, and and there are reports they will not tender a contract to Ruben Tejada.

Desmond hit .233 last year with a .290 on-base percentage, and hit 19 homers with 62 RBI in 641 plate appearances. By comparison, Flores hit 16 homers with 59 RBI in 510 plate appearances. So, that means Desmond 131 more plate appearances to hit just three more homers with three more RBI.

And, he cost over $10 million for those three homers and three RBI. You can throw out any of the new wave statistics you want, but none of them translate in any way to making the Mets a better team.

Defensively, Desmond committed 27 errors in 670 chances, while Flores made 14 errors in 400 chances at shortstop and didn’t make an error in 153 chances at second base.

i don’t see how those numbers in any way determine an upgrade at shortstop.

Like I said, I don’t know what the Mets will do this winter, but I can without a doubt what they shouldn’t do, and that’s go after Desmond.

Nov 18

Syndergaard My Choice As Met Pitcher Most Likely To Win Cy Young

As expected in many circles, Jake Arrieta, Zack Greinke and Clayton Kershaw finished 1-2-3 in the National League’s Cy Young Award voting. Despite having a solid season, the Mets’ Jacob deGrom finished seventh in the voting. No surprise in any of that.

SYNDERGAARD: My choice as Met most likely to win Cy  Young. (Getty)

SYNDERGAARD: My choice as Met most likely to win Cy Young. (Getty)

It might turn out that deGrom might eventually win the Cy Young Award, but my guess is of the Mets’ young core, Noah Syndergaard will be the first of their stellar, young core to win. Matt Harvey is the sexy pick, but he doesn’t have Syndergaard’s “stuff,” and for that matter, he doesn’t have deGrom’s “stuff,” either.

There’s something magical and electric about pitchers able to throw 100 mph., and pile up the strikeouts. There’s no accounting for injuries and bad luck, but call it a hunch. Of all their young pitchers, I’m going with Syndergaard as the first one to bring back the hardware.

Who knows? If could happen as soon as next season. Wouldn’t that be sweet?