Jan 25

Alderson Takes Jab At Flores

Sandy Alderson thinks he’s funny, but he’s not. He once joked about driving to spring training to save money for the financially distressed Mets.

He joked about not putting together an outfield, and now took a poke at the shortstop situation and Wilmer Flores.

On Saturday night at the annual Baseball Writers Association dinner in New York, when presenting an award to Hall of Famer Cal Ripken Jr., Alderson reportedly said: “Mets fans have been waiting all winter for me to introduce a shortstop.’’

Yes, there’s a touch of humor there, but why take a jab at one of your players for a cheap laugh? How do you think Flores feels? It’s bad enough he has to go through every shortstop rumor, but now is the butt of joke by his boss.

When Alderson says things like this, he’s not only poking fun at Flores, but the Mets’ organization – his employers – and himself. Indirectly, he’s also poking fun at Mets fans, dismissing their feelings and opinions.

 

Jan 23

Gee Emblematic Of Difference Between Mets And Giants

It is more than talented players that separate the San Francisco Giants from the Mets. There is also an organizational philosophy. The Giants’ is about winning; the Mets is about pinching pennies.

It was simply a single line item in the transactions, that the Giants opted to re-sign pitcher Ryan Vogelsong. Here is a team with three World Series titles in the past five years that is loaded with pitching. Madison Bumgarner, Matt Cain, Tim Lincecum, Tim Hudson and Jake Peavey. That’s five starters. Vogelsong makes six, and don’t forget Yusmeiro Petit.

They all have substantial major league track records.

Meanwhile, the Mets are optimistic about their young rotation, and despite legitimate questions about every pitcher, they are determined to deal Dillon Gee, who’ll make just $5.3 million in 2015.

What the Giants realize, that although they have a glut of pitching, you can never have enough pitching. And, this is a perennial winner.

Meanwhile, the Mets, who haven’t had a winning season since 2008, are gambling they will have no pitching issues this summer and are willing to deal Gee to prove their point.

It’s not a gamble they should make.

Jan 22

Mets Who Could Be Gone After This Year

As a team trying to reach the next level, the New York Mets have several players entering make-or-break seasons. If they don’t produce in 2015 they could find themselves gone next year.

The reasons for their potential departure range from age, to finances, to performance. Here’s who I am thinking needs to put up or shut up:

Bartolo Colon: At 41, Colon is entering the second season of a two-year contract. Despite working 200 innings last season, the Mets are trying to trade him. They certainly won’t bring him back for another $10 million. The best scenario is to find a taker at the trade deadline.

Jon Niese: All the reasons why Niese was attractive in the past – age, left-handed, reasonable contract – don’t matter much anymore because of his recent injury history and poor performance. Their best bet is for him to pitch well in the first half and draw trade interest.

Bobby Parnell: He’s coming off an injury and has never pitched to expectations. With Jenrry Mejia and Jeurys Familia showing promise, it could be time to cut the cord and move on. This guy had a million-dollar arm, but only recently showed an understanding about pitching. If he’s a bust this year, why would they bring him back?

Curtis Granderson: He has two more years after 2015, which could make him easier to trade. But, if he doesn’t show glimpses of substantial power who would take him? This much we know about the Mets – they will try to get something and won’t eat his contract.

Travis d’Arnaud: He showed some promise in 2014, but the Mets want more offensive production. I can see them moving on if he doesn’t hit this summer.

Daniel Murphy: Like I said when Murphy agreed to a 2015 contract, this year will be his last. Had the Mets wanted to keep him they would have signed him a while ago. Ideally, they’d like to get something in return, but if they don’t, they will let him walk.

Wilmer Flores: This is his chance. The Mets have been looking for a shortstop for a few years, but Flores goes in as the starter by default. They considered a few names this winter, but none seriously. If Flores doesn’t pan out, but their young pitching does, the Mets might be forced to pay up next winter.

 

Jan 19

Gap Between Mets, Nats Wider Than You Think

The Mets finished in a second-place tie last season in the NL East 17 games behind the pennant winning Washington Nationals.

GEE: Trying to move him. (Getty)The two current storylines of these teams suggest a wider gap – much wider.

The Nationals, who won 96 games last season with the NL’s deepest rotation, will add free-agent prize Max Scherzer. Meanwhile, the Mets are taking flak for charging their players to participate in an off-season conditioning program. The Mets are also still attempting to trade Dillon Gee, and word is they don’t have to get a major leaguer in return. Shows what they think of their most reliable starter the past few seasons.

The Nationals are trying to sell the prospect of the World Series to their fan base. The Mets are still trying to sell a .500 season.

To make room for Scherzer’s contract, the Nationals are willing to trade shortstop Ian Desmond, who will become a free-agent after this year. Yes, the Mets could use Desmond to address their shortstop question, but the Nationals’ asking price would be exorbitant for a one-year rental.

Trading for Desmond could be a giant step back if he leaves, and put on the financial shackles if they signed him to an extension.

While adding Scherzer doesn’t guarantee anything, it definitely puts them in good position to be thinking deep into October.

Reportedly, San Francisco, San Diego and Colorado are interested in Gee.

The Mets would like to unload Gee before spring training, but I believe they would get a greater return if they waited until the trade deadline.

 

 

Jan 18

Selig Rewards Wilpon For Not Spending

This blog gets many comments imploring Major League Baseball to force the Wilpons to sell the Mets. I said it will never happen, and the recent move by MLB to name Fred Wilpon to chair the Finance Committee underscores that position.

We should remember while Bud Selig is commissioner, he is first and foremost a former owner. His roots are in ownership and that’s where his sentiment lies.

Selig is tight with Wilpon, always has been and probably always will be. Selig isn’t interested in the Mets increasing their payroll. His position as commissioner has always been to reduce payroll and that’s exactly what Wilpon has done with the Mets.

Basically, Selig rewarded Wilpon for not spending.

Wilpon has run the Mets the way Selig would if he were owner. Wilpon has been a good soldier for Selig, and for that, has been rewarded.

Surprised?