Sep 12

Mets Flat Against Nats; Colon Implodes

Terry Collins earned his extension after last season because his team played hard, alert and aggressive baseball for him down the stretch.

They did anything but Thursday night. They talk about finishing on a high note, but in their 6-2 loss to Washington looked too much like the “same old Mets’’ of the past few seasons.

COLON: Raked by Nats (Getty)

COLON: Raked by Nats (Getty)

Bartolo Colon started digging the hole early by giving up a two-run homer to Adam LaRoche and then hitting Ian Desmond in the first. In the fourth, he hit Jayson Werth after Anthony Rendon homered.

In the second, Colon’s throwing error led to an unearned run.

Colon was tossed in the fourth to force Terry Collins to go deep into his bullpen. Not a good way to start a four-game series with the Nationals.

“I was surprised,” Colon told, “because … I hit Desmond after the home run and nothing happened.’’

That’s the point. Desmond was hit in the first, but it didn’t look blatant. Werth was another matter, and Colon knows that, even without an admission.

“That was a two-seam fastball that moved inside to him,’’ Colon said of the pitch to Werth. “I was trying to pitch him inside.’’

Despite the ejection, Colon probably wasn’t long for the game anyway as his last pitch was No. 70, it was the fourth inning and the Mets were down six and well on their way of losing their 12th straight Washington at home, and 26th in their last 30 at Citi Field.

There’s being bad, but a team can’t be dominated that much at home to a division opponent. That’s not the way to a winning season.

Neither is their offense, which only once in the 12 games against the Nationals this season scored more than three runs.

Last night, the Mets hit into two double plays, including Travis d’Arnaud losing track of the outs and was doubled off first on Dilson Herrara’s infield pop-up in the second. In another base running blunder, Eric Young was thrown out attempting to reach third on an errant pickoff. Overall, the Mets left six runners on and went 2-for-8 with runners in scoring position.

NOTEBOOK: Daniel Murphy left the game in the eight when he was hit on his left wrist by a Matt Thornton fastball. Murphy said he doesn’t believe he was hit intentionally as retaliation for Colon. Don’t bet on him playing tomorrow. … Dillon Gee (6-7, 3.74) goes against Gio Gonzalez (8-9, 3.78).

 

Jul 27

Glavine Gets Inducted Into Hall of Fame

glavine-739958The Baseball Hall of Fame will induct its 2014 class today in Cooperstown, NY and standing among them will be two former Mets. Joe Torre, who was elected by the Veterans Committee, played for the Mets from 1975-1977, where he hit .267 with 12 home runs and 75 RBI in 254 games. Torre began his managerial career with the Mets in 1977 and skippered the team through 1981, going 286-420. LHP?Tom Glavine will also be enshrined today. Glavine was 61-56 with a 3.97 ERA?in five seasons (2004-2007) with New York.

To baseball fans, Glavine was one of the best pitchers of his generation.  He won 305 games over his 22-year career, including five 20-win seasons.  He finished in the top three in Cy Young Award balloting six times, while winning the award twice (1991, 1998).

Mets fans might remember him for something different.  Some will remember Glavine for picking up his 300th career victory in 2007 as a member of the Mets. Others will remember his outstanding 2006 campaign; a year in which he finished with a 15-7 record in the regular season and followed that up with two more victories in the postseason, which included a sparkling 1.59 ERA in three starts.

Some of us will only remember Glavine for his final appearance in a Mets uniform…

On September 30, 2007, just one day after John Maine pitched his near no-hitter against the Marlins to help the Mets tie the Phillies in the standings going into the regular season finale, Glavine was only able to record one out against Florida in what would be the worst start of his career.

The veteran southpaw was tagged hard for seven runs – all earned – by the Marlins that day in a devastating 8-1 loss.  Coupled with Philadelphia’s victory over the Washington Nationals, the Mets failed to repeat as division champions in 2007 and the late-season collapse was etched in stone. With a seven-game division lead on September 12, the Mets lost 12 of their last 17 games in what is regarded as one of the worst collapses in MLB history.

If his poor performance against the Marlins wasn’t enough to enrage Mets fans, his post-game comments surely managed to do the trick when Glavine told reporters he was disappointed but not devastated.

“I spent a pretty big hunk of my career in New York. And I know at first I was just a guy coming in. But after a while, I became comfortable, and I think I was accepted. Winning the National League East in 2006 made it better, and then I won my 300th with the Mets. I felt I had the city behind me. If we had beaten the Marlins in the last game, I don’t think I would have lost any standing. But the way it worked out wasn’t as good as it could have been.”

As a baseball fan, I appreciate what Tom Glavine did on the baseball field.  While I rooted for him everyday as a Met. for some reason I never quite looked at him as a Met. Whenever I saw him I saw Greg Maddux, John Smoltz, Chipper Jones and Bobby Cox. The Tomahawk Chop would be playing in my head. He’ll be joining his teammate Maddux this afternoon on that podium.

I want to congratulate Glavine, who was always a class act on and off the field. He was a great competitor, a quality postseason pitcher, and he was always a plus in the clubhouse.

However, as a Mets fan, every time I think of the final 17 games of the 2007 season, I think of Tom Glavine. In many ways we are still trying to recover from that historic collapse.

Congratulations on your Hall of Fame enshrinement, Mr. Glavine.

MMO footer

Mar 20

Mets’ Pitching Updates: Gee Could Be Opening Day Starter With Niese To DL

They are called “probable’’ pitchers for a reason. It’s because anything can happen, and for the Mets they frequently do.

Injuries to his shoulder and now elbow bumped Jonathon Niese from his scheduled Opening Day start, and thrust Dillon Gee into that role. However, manager Terry Collins has not shut the door on Bartolo Colon.

The current plan is for Niese to open the season on the disabled list and not pitch him until April 6, the fourth game of the season against Cincinnati at Citi Field. He received a cortisone injection Monday to treat elbow inflammation.

Based on his consistency last season and leading the staff with 199 innings pitched, Gee is deserving of the honor of starting Opening Day, March 31, against Washington at Citi Field. Gee had been penciled in start the third game of the season, also against Washington, because of his 4-2 record with a 2.72 ERA last year against the Nationals.

Gee had career highs last year in: innings (199), starts (32), complete games (two), strikeouts (142) and ERA (3.62).

The Mets’ rotation to open the season figures to be: Gee, Colon and Zack Wheeler against the Nationals, followed by Daisuke Matsuzaka, Gee and Niese against Cincinnati.

The Nationals’ projected starters in the first series will be Stephen Strasburg, Gio Gonzalez and Jordan Zimmerman.