Oct 18

Hudgens Lands Job With Astros

Word the Houston Astros hired former Mets hitting coach Dave Hudgens raised the simple question: What’s going on in the Mets’ search to fill that position?

The Mets are interested in Dave Magadan and former Yankees hitting coach Kevin Long. The Yankees are also pursuing Magadan.

Hudgens’ philosophy is to work deep into the count, but when the Mets’ sputtered to start the season he was fired, May 26. The Mets’ rationalization was the hitters lost their aggressiveness. A lot of that was traced to Lucas Duda’s inability in 2013 to hit with runners in scoring position.

That’s rather weak because most hitting coaches preach patience until the batter gets his pitch. It’s up to the hitter to be able to recognize what that pitch is and to be ready to crush it. Despite the steroids, you must give credit to Barry Bonds’ selectivity. There were times when Bonds would get one hittable pitch to hit – and he did.

This week the Mets also lost Triple-A Las Vegas hitting coach George Greer by St. Louis to oversee their organizational philosophy.

 

Lamar Johnson replaced Hudgens and was reassigned to the minor leagues after the season.

Oct 16

Mets’ Triple-A Hitting Coach Hired By Cardinals

The St. Louis Cardinals, a regular in the NLCS, has hired Mets’ Triple-A hitting coach George Greer to oversee their hitting program throughout their system, reports ESPN.

Didn’t I hear the Mets needed a new hitting coach?

If he’s qualified to be hired by the Cardinals, shouldn’t he at least gotten a serious look from the Mets?

Sep 12

Mets Flat Against Nats; Colon Implodes

Terry Collins earned his extension after last season because his team played hard, alert and aggressive baseball for him down the stretch.

They did anything but Thursday night. They talk about finishing on a high note, but in their 6-2 loss to Washington looked too much like the “same old Mets’’ of the past few seasons.

COLON: Raked by Nats (Getty)

COLON: Raked by Nats (Getty)

Bartolo Colon started digging the hole early by giving up a two-run homer to Adam LaRoche and then hitting Ian Desmond in the first. In the fourth, he hit Jayson Werth after Anthony Rendon homered.

In the second, Colon’s throwing error led to an unearned run.

Colon was tossed in the fourth to force Terry Collins to go deep into his bullpen. Not a good way to start a four-game series with the Nationals.

“I was surprised,” Colon told, “because … I hit Desmond after the home run and nothing happened.’’

That’s the point. Desmond was hit in the first, but it didn’t look blatant. Werth was another matter, and Colon knows that, even without an admission.

“That was a two-seam fastball that moved inside to him,’’ Colon said of the pitch to Werth. “I was trying to pitch him inside.’’

Despite the ejection, Colon probably wasn’t long for the game anyway as his last pitch was No. 70, it was the fourth inning and the Mets were down six and well on their way of losing their 12th straight Washington at home, and 26th in their last 30 at Citi Field.

There’s being bad, but a team can’t be dominated that much at home to a division opponent. That’s not the way to a winning season.

Neither is their offense, which only once in the 12 games against the Nationals this season scored more than three runs.

Last night, the Mets hit into two double plays, including Travis d’Arnaud losing track of the outs and was doubled off first on Dilson Herrara’s infield pop-up in the second. In another base running blunder, Eric Young was thrown out attempting to reach third on an errant pickoff. Overall, the Mets left six runners on and went 2-for-8 with runners in scoring position.

NOTEBOOK: Daniel Murphy left the game in the eight when he was hit on his left wrist by a Matt Thornton fastball. Murphy said he doesn’t believe he was hit intentionally as retaliation for Colon. Don’t bet on him playing tomorrow. … Dillon Gee (6-7, 3.74) goes against Gio Gonzalez (8-9, 3.78).