Nov 07

Expect No Trades, No Limits On Mets Starters In 2016

Expect no trades or innings restrictions on the Mets’ 2016 starting rotation. With the anticipated departure of outfielder Yoenis Cespedes, there have been numerous reports the Mets might explore obtaining a bat in exchange for Matt Harvey, Noah Syndergaard, Jacob deGrom and Steven Matz.

HARVEY: Expect no limits in 2016. (AP)

HARVEY: Expect no limits in 2016. (AP)

The Mets attempted to trade Zack Wheeler, who spent the season on the disabled list following Tommy John surgery, but that deal fell through.

“I can’t see it happening,’’ Alderson said this week of a possible trade among the four who were on the postseason roster. “You never know what comes up. But I think it’s unlikely.’’

The Mets attempted to trade Jon Niese in the past and are expected to do so again this winter. If not, he could stay in the rotation until Wheeler is ready to come off the disabled list in July.

If they are able to trade Niese, Logan Verrett or Rafael Montero could slide into the rotation until Wheeler is ready.

The concept of innings restrictions became a hot issue in the second half of the season, but manager Terry Collins said that should not become a topic in 2016.

An innings jump of 30 to 40 innings is considered normal, and is that turns out to be the case all the starters should exceed 200 innings, with Matz reaching about 190.

“We went into the second half of the season with pitching issues that had to be handled and had to be dealt with,’’ Collins said. “Hopefully next year, with what these guys have gone through this year, that won’t be the case. It might be, ‘Hey, look, we want to skip a guy here.’ ’’


Nov 06

Mets Make Qualifying Offer To Murphy

The Mets’ first order of postseason business was extending manager Terry Collins for two years, and their second step was to make Daniel Murphy to a one-year, $15.8-million qualifying offer. He has a week to respond.

As with Collins, the Murphy deal was a no-brainer for the following reasons:

MURPHY:  Mets expected to make offer. (Getty)

MURPHY: Mets expected to make offer. (Getty)

1) If Murphy rejects the offer the Mets would receive a compensatory draft pick from the team that signs him.

2) The Mets are currently reluctant to give Murphy the reported figure of $50 million over four years. Before going long-term with Murphy, the Mets must first figure out if his post-season power run was an aberration or a sign of things to come.

3) That question could possibly be answered this year. Keeping Murphy around for another year could also enable them to figure out David Wright’s physical status and bide time for Ruben Tejada to heal.

If those two health issues are realized, Murphy would be a capable insurance policy.

If Murphy’s power surge is not a fluke the Mets will probably have to cough up more than if they signed him to a multi-year deal now, but that’s a gamble they would have to take.

Should the Mets be willing to go long-term on Murphy, he could give them a home-team discount.

“I like it here, and I’d like to come back,’’ Murphy said after the World Series. “I feel blessed to have been a Met this long.’’

Murphy was a 13th-round round pick of the Mets in 2006.

Among the teams that might have interest in Murphy are both Los Angeles teams, San Francisco and the Yankees.

NOTEBOOK:  The team said center fielder Juan Lagares will not require surgery on his right elbow. Lagares had a breakout season in 2014 and was rewarded with a multi-year contract, but regressed this season and had difficulty throwing. … Outfielder Michael Cuddyer underwent surgery to repair a core muscle injury. He will make $12.5 million in 2016. … LH reliever Josh Smoker was added to the 40-man roster. … A published report from Washington said the Mets could be interested in outfielder Denard Span, who was not given a qualifying offer by the Nationals.

Nov 05

Mets Matters: Granderson Has Surgery; Harvey Comeback Winner

Curtis Granderson, arguably the Mets’ Most Valuable Player this year, underwent surgery to repair a torn ligament in his left thumb and is expected to be ready for spring training.

Granderson was injured making a headfirst slide in Game 3 of the NLCS, but played in the World Series and hit three homers.

mets-matters logoOne of the significant storylines of the season was when Granderson was thrust into leadoff role over Juan Lagares and hit .259 with 26 homers, 70 RBI and a .364 on-base percentage in 157 games. Seven of those homers were leading off games to set a club record.

Granderson is a finalist for the NL Gold Glove Award. He has two more years on his contract and will make $16 million next season and $15 million in 2017.

HARVEY NL COMEBACK PLAYER: Matt Harvey won the award no player wants because it meant a bad season, either by injury or performance.

In Harvey’s case it was injury as he missed the 2014 season after undergoing Tommy John surgery. His innings became an issue, but the 180 announced by his agent, Scott Boras, turned out to be 216 before it was done.

Harvey was 13-18 with a 2.71 ERA in 29 starts. Harvey won two games in the playoffs, but will be remembered for bullying manager Terry Collins to allow him to go out for the ninth inning in Game 5 fo the World Series.

Nov 05

Extending My Apologies To Sandy Alderson

In my coverage of the Mets, from my days as a newspaper reporter to this blog, I have been a proponent for being stand-up. I have applauded David Wright, Daniel Murphy, ,manager Terry Collins and others for accepting responsibility when things go wrong.

ALDERSON: You have reason to smile. (AP)

ALDERSON: You have reason to smile. (AP)

And, I have been critical of Matt Harvey for not always doing the same.

Given that, I must hold myself to the same standards and admit I was wrong on GM Sandy Alderson on several issues this year. Among them:

* Not having a concrete plan for Harvey as to his innings limit, or at least, not being open with it.

* For his reluctance to promote outfield prospect Michael Conforto from the minor leagues when the team was in a woeful hitting slump.

* For seemingly dragging his feet on bringing in a bat at the trade deadline. And, when the Carlos Gomez trade with Milwaukee fell through, Alderson deserves considerable credit for despite the rapidly approaching deadline, kicking the tires on Jay Bruce from Cincinnati before landing Yoenis Cespedes.

The bottom line: No Cespedes, no playoffs.

Alderson told us to be patient and rewarded us.

When the Harvey news broke, Alderson went with the flow and worked with the appropriate parties to make sure it wasn’t a lingering problem. And, well Conforto made the most with his opportunity and in addition to gaining valuable experience, helped the Mets to the World Series.

He’s expected to be a starter next season and the Mets are far ahead because they already have a book on him. In both cases, Alderson did what he was supposed to do, which was act in a manner that made the Mets better. Nobody can ask for more.

There’s no rest for him as he’ll be attending the general managers meetings next week. Next year has already begun and with it a myriad of issues, from rebuilding a bullpen, and making hard decisions on Cespedes, Murphy, the middle infield and ascertaining where things are with Wright’s back.

I’ll voice my opinion as I always do, but for now, Alderson deserves to savor this season without my two cents.

So, cheers to you Mr. Alderson for making me, and countless Mets fans, eat our words. Your instincts about this team were correct and I was wrong. You had one hell of a year.