Jul 29

Three Mets’ Storylines: Collins Says Team Needs To “Lighten Up”

This time, Mets fans booed – and loudly. Once again the Mets were horrid with RISP, when Scott Oberg entered with two on and nobody out in the eighth and got out of the inning on three pitches.

And, then in the top of the night, old nemesis Carlos Gonzalez, who had been rumored in previous years to be going to the Mets, crushed a three-run homer to ice it for the Colorado Rockies, 6-1, Friday night before yet another disappointed Citi Field crowd.

MATZ: Tough outing. (AP)

MATZ: Tough outing. (AP)

Speaking of old thorns, Mark Reynolds homered again for his tenth career homer against the Mets and seventh at Citi Field.

What Mets manager Terry Collins, to his credit, did not do, was boo his team. Collins can get testy but this time massaged the ego of his frustrated team.

“We have a good team,” Collins told reporters. “We’re going through a rough time right. We’re not dead. We’re still in the hunt. We need to lighten it up and have some fun.”

Collins addressed his team after the game, telling them, “we have to stop worrying about some of the bad things and concentrate on some of the good things.’’

The bad things are the Mets were 0-for-8 with RISP Friday and 5-for-50 on the homestand. They are .144 with RISP since the All-Star break.

However, Collins didn’t reinforce that, which was a good thing. I’ve been on Collins a lot lately, and don’t back off that criticism, but in all fairness what he did Friday was the right thing to do.

MATZ KEPT IT CLOSE: Giving up ten hits and one walk in six innings is by no means good, but somehow Steven Matz limited the damage to just two runs.

That should be good enough to win most games, and that’s what Collins told him.

“I told him he kept us in the game,” Collins said. “And, he should be happy about that.”

ROSTER MOVES: Prior to the game the Mets put outfielder Juan Lagares (thumb) on the disabled list and replaced by Brandon Nimmo.

Collins said after the game there’s a possibility Jose Reyes could go on the disabled list.

 

Jul 29

Where Does Piazza Rank On Your All-Time Mets’ List?

Hall of Famer Mike Piazza is undoubtedly one of the greatest Mets of all time. Where does he rank on your list?

From the following, please rank your list of all-time Mets.

1.   Tom Seaver

2.   Piazza

3.   David Wright

4.   Jerry Koosman

5.   Dwight Gooden

6.   Darryl Strawberry

7.   Keith Hernandez

8.   Gary Carter

9.    Bud Harrelson

10.  Ed Kranepool

11.  Ron Swoboda

12.  Tug McGraw

13.  Rusty Staub

14. Jerry Grote

15. Edgardo Alfonzo

16. Other

 

Jul 29

Mets Lineup, July 29 Against Rockies

The Mets play the second game in their four-game series on Mike Piazza Weekend. After a crushing defeat Thursday, Steven Matz attempts to even things up.

Here’s tonight’s lineup for the Mets:

Curtis Granderson – RF: With Jose Reyes on the shelf indefinitely, Granderson goes back to the top of the order.

Travis d’Arnaud – C: This is an interesting move. d’Arnaud clearly isn’t a conventional No. 2 hitter, but then again the Mets don’t have a traditional lineup these days, either.

Yoenis Cespedes – LF: He hasn’t been well since early July. The more they play him the less they can backdate any move to the DL.

James Loney – 1B: Has actually been the Mets’ most consistent hitter. He represents one of GM Sandy Alderson’s best moves.

Neil Walker – 2B: With back-to-back three-hit games, he has his swing back. Kind of thought he’d hit third or fourth.

Wilmer Flores – 3B: Once again doing well with Reyes down.

Asdrubal Cabrera – SS: He’s most comfortable hitting second, so it’s somewhat of a surprise to see him this low.

Michael Conforto – CF: Manager Terry Collins won’t learn. Conforto needs to be left alone hitting third.

Matz – LHP: Was a pinch-runner yesterday. Has pitched decently with bone spur.

 

Jul 28

Collins Lets Down Mets

Welcome back to “Panic City.” While some of us are residents, the mayor isn’t you or me, but Mets manager Terry Collins. No doubt the population could be growing after the Mets lost in agonizing and aggravating fashion for the second straight game, this time, 2-1, Thursday to the Colorado Rockies on Jeurys Familia‘s second blown save in less than 24 hours.

Of course, while it is easy to blame Familia and their chronic failure to hit with runners in scoring position, the primary culprit was Collins, whose game management wasted a brilliant effort by Jacob deGrom, who threw seven scoreless innings.

DE GROM: Mets waste his effort. (AP)

DE GROM: Mets waste his effort. (AP)

The Mets had a 1-0 lead and were poised to break the game open in the seventh when they had runners on second and third with no outs. They had ten hits, one walk, and had a runner reach on an error, so getting on base wasn’t the problem.

One would have thought they would have scored at least one run even by accident with deGrom due up. However, Collins sent up pinch-hitter Yoenis Cespedes – a temporary hitter from the previous night – despite knowing the Rockies would intentionally walk him.

“Let’s load the bases and make them get out of it,” the baseball lifer Collins told reporters. However, he must have conveniently forgotten defensive teams traditionally walk the bases full to set up a force at the plate or a double play. That strategy applies to the seventh as well as the ninth.

The force at the plate came soon enough when pinch-hitter Kelly Johnson – battling for Juan Lagares – hit a grounder to shortstop and Trevor Story‘s throw nailed Rivera. Curtis Granderson struck out on a wild swing, and Wilmer Flores popped out.

So, by batting Cespedes for deGrom, Collins lost his starter, Cespedes for a pinch-runner and Lagares. Had deGrom stayed in it would have enabled Addison Reed to close, which was the original plan.

After Familia’s blown save the previous night – in which he threw close to 30 pitches – Collins matter-of-factly said he would rest today. He didn’t because Familia told him before the game he was available. Add this to the growing list of statements Collins makes yet retreats on.

After Story singled, stole second and David Dahl walked, you knew this wasn’t going to end well. Daniel Descalso beat out a bunt in front of the plate when Rene Rivera gambled to let the ball roll foul, which it didn’t.

There’s bad luck, dumb luck and Mets’ luck, which is the worst kind. As it turned out, that would be the Rockies’ only hit of the inning. Colorado tied it on a fielder’s choice grounder and Familia’s wild pitch.

So, Collins went against his better judgment and used Familia just because the closer said he could pitch. We all know how that turned out in Game 5 of the World Series. But this time the season didn’t end.

Not yet, anyway.

 

 

Jul 27

Three Mets’ Storylines: Loss A Gut Check

The Mets’ 2015 signature was resiliency; their ability to bounce back from adversity and seemingly crushing defeat.

It was around this time last season when Jeurys Familia blew his last save in a rain-soaked, thought-to-be devastating loss to San Diego. The night before Wilmer Flores endeared himself to Mets Nation when he shed tears out at shortstop after thinking he’d been traded.

What happened next will forever be a part of Mets’ lore. GM Sandy Alderson got Yoenis Cespedes in a trade, Flores homered to beat Washington and become an iconic presence, and the Mets sizzled into the World Series. In their champagne drenched clubhouses in Dodger Stadium and Wrigley Field, to a man, the Mets trumpeted their ability to get off the mat as to what their team about.

CESPEDES: Can't do it all. (AP)

CESPEDES: Can’t do it all. (AP)

It’s time to show that quality again, following the season’s most disappointing and potentially devastating loss of the season, 5-4 to the St. Louis Cardinals, Wednesday night after Familia’s first blown save.

“This is really a tough one to take,” drained Mets manager Terry Collins told reporters. “When you come back on Adam Wainwright and have a chance to win the game, that’s a pretty big night. And then to have your closer, who just has been lights out, give up two, that’s a little tougher to take.”

Will it turn bitter and send them on an out-of-control slide or force that character to the surface?

Logan Verrett gave the Mets a chance to win, giving up three runs in seven innings. But, in the bottom half of the inning and a run already in to pull the Mets within a run, on the ninth-pitch of a heavyweight battle, Cespedes swung to create two unmistakable sounds.

There was the crack of the bat that punctuates a Cespedes home run and the explosion of emotion that engulfed Citi Field, which hadn’t been this loud since last October.

Cespedes wasn’t even back in the dugout when the inevitable thought was raised: Could this be the at-bat, the game, to propel the Mets?

With Familia riding a streak of 52 consecutive saves, it was a logical conclusion.

Addison Reed stuffed the Cardinals, 1-2-3 in the eighth, but it wasn’t long before Familia, who has given us jitters before, showed he didn’t have it.

Familia got the first hitter, but then walked Jedd Gyorko on four pitches. Gyorko homered swinging at first-pitch fastballs in both games of Tuesday’s doubleheader, so Familia was going to be careful. He was too careful with sliders away.

Then Yadier Molina, who has broken Mets’ hearts before, doubled over the head of center fielder Juan Lagares and pinch-runner Randal Grichuk scored standing up to tie the game.

“I think I left it a little bit in the middle, and he made a good swing,” the stand-up Familia told reporters of the pitch to Molina.

The Mets appeared off the hook with no less than a tie when Molina was caught going to third on Jeremy Hazelbaker’s bouncer back to the mound. However, Hazelbaker quickly stole second and scored on Kolten Wong’s pinch-hit double.

Citi Field was now as quiet as it was in the last inning of Game 5 of the World Series.

The Mets’ season ended that night. What will become of it after Wednesday night?

“We’re hoping,” Collins said on bouncing back. “This is something we haven’t had happen for a long time … Jeurys Familia with a blown save. We have to back tomorrow.”

It might be imperative.

The emotional turmoil was the first of three main storylines. The others were:

ESSENCE OF CESPEDES: Cespedes is clearly hobbling, but plays anyway for the chance at what happened in the seventh when he hit his first homer since July 5.

Cespedes’ importance to the Mets is further underscored in that they were 2-for-14 with RISP Wednesday, and just 4-for-33 in the series.

“We didn’t get past that,” Collins said the Mets’ primary issue this season. “We had a lot of opportunities to score some runs.”

If there was a bright spot to the offense – outside of Cespedes – it was a Neil Walker sighting.

Walker entered the game on a 2-for-39 slide, but reached base four times on three hits and a walk.

VERRETT START WASTED: Last season at Colorado, in replacing an injured Matt Harvey, Verrett might have come up with the most important start of the season for the Mets.

Verrett always says his job is to give his team a chance to win and he did that by giving up three runs in seven innings.

As the trade deadline approaches there’s concern by some the Mets might need another starter, but that won’t be the case if he keeps pitching the way he has in his last two starts.