Dec 09

Mets Find Little Interest In Bruce

Once again the Mets’ eagerness to get rid of a player is hindering their ability to make a trade. And make no mistake, the Mets don’t just want to trade Jay Bruce, they want to dump him.

If they could take back the trade that cost them prospect Dilson Herrera, they would do it in a heartbeat. They’d be lucky to get as much back.

BRUCE: Little interest. (AP)

BRUCE: Little interest. (AP)

The Mets made it clear they wanted to trade Ike Davis and the return was scant. They also made no secret of their desire to get rid of Oliver Perez, subsequently released him during spring training of 2011. While trying him in the bullpen was a natural option, but they didn’t do that and he’s been effective in that role since.

The Mets were also vocal in their displeasure of Jason Bay and had to buy him out. And, what did they get for Lastings Milledge, Francisco Rodriguez or Luis Castillo?

You’re right, next to nothing.

The point is if a team doesn’t want a player, the industry will find out without having to take out an ad or go on Facebook. If you’re that vocal in wanting to deal him, his trade value plummets. In what industry does a corporation (a team) go to such great lengths to devalue the product (the player) it is trying to sell (trade)?

You’re right again, the Mets.

The Mets made no secret their intention was to pick up Bruce’s option first as a safety net and then trade after they extended Yoenis Cespedes.

The New York Post described the interest in Bruce as “tepid” and “minimal.” Maybe the Mets will eventually make a deal, but don’t count on them getting the reliever they need.

The market is such that there is currently a glut of outfielders, which makes it more difficult to trade an outfielder. Why trade when you can sign a player and not having to surrender players or prospects in return?

It’s common sense and the Mets should have seen this coming.

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Dec 08

Alderson Still Searching

The Mets left Washington this morning the way they often do after playing the Nationals – empty handed. The Mets’ big off-season move consisted of extending Yoenis Cespedes, which they did before leaving New York, but their other objectives were left unfulfilled.

ALDERSON: Still has work to do. (AP)

ALDERSON: Still has work to do. (AP)

They failed to deal Jay Bruce or Curtis Granderson, bolster their bullpen or find a catcher. However, Alderson said the Winter Meetings shouldn’t be defined by three days of lobby fishing in a swanky Washington resort hotel.

“I think we laid some groundwork, as they say, and I’ve had conversations that will continue when we get back to New York,” Alderson told reporters this morning before leaving. “We were pleased with the face we had some dialogue. We’ll pursue things over the next couple of weeks.”The Mets want to trade Bruce (who’ll make $13 million in 2017) and/or Granderson ($15 million). Alderson said the preference is dealing Bruce – although many teams like Granderson – but if he could swing also swing a deal for Granderson, make no mistake, he’ll jump at the chance to save $28 million.

The Mets want to trade Bruce (who’ll make $13 million in 2017) and/or Granderson ($15 million). Alderson said the preference is dealing Bruce – although many teams like Granderson – but if he could also swing a deal for Granderson, make no mistake, he’ll jump at the chance to save $28 million.

However, Alderson’s phone isn’t ringing for either.

“Outfielders, hitters, there’s still a quite of few of them out there. Clubs are still trying to sort out their priorities,” Alderson said. “I think when there’s that kind of supply, things are going to go a little a slower initially as everybody considers their options.”

It’s slow going for the Mets because most teams would rather sign a free agent than give up prospects or players. This could drag into January and might not get done until spring training it at all.

While Alderson insists his priority is a playing time situation in the outfield, reportedly he won’t entirely spend the savings on the bullpen. There are reports Jerry Blevins wants at least $5.5 million and that the Mets are interested in Texas’ Jeremy Jeffress, 29, who had a 2.33 ERA in 59 games last year and is arbitration eligible.

ESPN reports the Mets’ current payroll to be $146 million.

Dec 07

Wheeler To The Pen Has To Be For Right Reasons

The first thing I thought of after hearing the Mets were considering using Zack Wheeler out of the bullpen was “don’t let this turn out to be another Jenrry Mejia.”

You’ll recall the Mets bounced Mejia from the rotation to the bullpen, without leaving him long enough to grasp either role. Consequently, Mejia’s trade value deteriorated and he eventually injured his arm. He appeared to get it together as a closer until he screwed up his career by violating MLB’s PED policy.

WHEELER: A new role? (Getty)

WHEELER: A new role? (Getty)

Wheeler in the pen is an intriguing idea, but it has to be done for the right reasons. If it is because they are apparently deep with young starters and woefully thin in the pen, made more so with the anticipated suspension of closer Jeurys Familia, then I can see that logic. If it is because Wheeler only has two really good pitches, then that’s a justifiable reason, also.

However, if the reasoning is what manager Terry Collins said at the Winter Meetings, which is to shave innings off Wheeler’s total before he moves into the rotation later in the year, then that’s not good enough. It’s not good at all.

Wheeler said all the right things today at Citi Field during a coat drive.

“I’ve started my whole life, and obviously, I’d like to do that,” Wheeler told reporters. “But they’re looking out for me, innings-wise and stuff like that. I’ve been out for two years, so … whatever’s best for my health is what’s fine with me and the plan going forward.”

The Mets wouldn’t be looking after Wheeler if they bounced him around. If they are serious about the bullpen, they have to go all in. That means use him there in spring training and stay with it the entire season.

GM Sandy Alderson said this is currently in the bounce-it-off-the-wall phase.

“There’s no reason for us to say, `Well, he’s got to be a starter,’ ” Alderson told reporters. “Now, he may feel that way himself. But, it may be that coming back after two years you have to be careful. You might not be able to pitch him back-to-back [days]. It might have to be two innings at a time. But, I don’t see any reason to just eliminate that possibility.”

Wheeler hasn’t pitched in two seasons, so the Mets don’t know what to make of him physically. As a starter, he’ll have a more consistent schedule and workload, so that’s a plus.

There are too many variables that tax a pitcher’s arm coming out of the pen, especially if that’s a new role for him. That makes it risky.

Pitchers have made the transition from starter to reliever and been successful. I’m not saying the Mets would be making a mistake. The mistake would come if they waffled and changed course, especially without knowing his condition.

Dec 06

Mets Aren’t In Blockbuster Mode

The Boston Red Sox are in a tough division but went all out today in trading for ace Chris Sale at the cost of four prospects.

Meanwhile, the Mets need to build their bullpen, but are trying to make a reclamation project out of Zack Wheeler and reportedly are playing hardball with Jerry Blevins on a multi-year package that won’t exceed $18 million and subsequently might not do anything until January.

SALE: Monster move. (ChicagoNow)

SALE: Monster move. (ChicagoNow)

Yankees GM Brian Cashman labeled the Red Sox the Warriors of Major League Baseball. Does that make the Mets the Knicks of baseball, or worse, the Nets?

The Nationals were poised on getting Sale. In fact, I heard a Washington Post reporter say it was all but a done deal. That was, of course, until the Red Sox swooped in and changed everything.

On Monday, another team in dire need of bullpen help – the Giants – didn’t wait for the market to take shape by having Aroldis Chapman or Kenley Jansen sign. They made a strong play for Mark Melancon.

Sale to the Red Sox and Melancon to the Giants helps the Mets. Their manager, Terry Collins said today, “we dodged a bullet,” after learning of Boston’s blockbuster.

But, do the Mets want to survive this way? They are waiting for somebody to come along and take Jay Bruce or Curtis Granderson off their hands.

What they aren’t doing is being proactive. They aren’t making things happen on their own. Yes, they brought back Yoenis Cespedes, but he was one of their own and their commitment to him is financially tying their hands.

I hear Boston and the Giants saying they want to win and they make bold moves. I hear the Mets say they want to win, but the big story with them today was Collins saying he wants to bring Tim Tebow to camp.

 

Dec 05

Toronto Cooling On Bruce, Granderson

What does it tell you when you hear that GM Sandy Alderson is willing to take a prospect rather than a major-league ready player for either Jay Bruce or Curtis Granderson?

Can you say “salary dump?”

GRANDERSON: Not going to Toronto. (AP)

GRANDERSON: Not going to Toronto. (AP)

Shedding $13 million for Bruce or $15 million for Granderson tells you of the Mets’ thinking these days. Saving payroll is when Alderson was hired in the first place, so that’s not new.

Reportedly, Alderson is willing to trade both, which means Michael Conforto must be the real deal and nothing better happen to Yoenis Cespedes or the Mets will be sunk.

You can surmise the Mets overachieved the last two years and are financially regressing. That’s not hard to understand, but what is are the reports they are interested in dealing Conforto. They couldn’t have possibly given up on him already.

A source I have in Toronto tells me the Blue Jays are interested in Conforto, but cooled considerably on either Bruce or Granderson. Could it be because the Mets want 25-year-old fireballer Marcus Stroman?

The Blue Jays don’t expect to bring back either Jose Bautista or Edwin Encarnacion, but the acquisitions of Kendrys Morales and Steve Pearce will ease that sting.