Looking At Trade Assets Duda And Cabrera

The Yankees’ acquisition of Todd Frazier hasn’t completely torpedoed their chances of trading for Mets’ first baseman Lucas Duda.

It’s not a great chance, but still possible.

DUDA: Has trade value. (AP)

DUDA: Has trade value. (AP)

Duda homered in this afternoon’s 3-2 victory over St. Louis. He has three homers and three doubles with six RBI in the seven games since the All-Star break. He has value.

The Yankees would have been a perfect fit for Duda, who would have formed a powerful platoon with Greg Bird when the latter comes off the disabled list. Duda heard all the rumors.

“It’s basically just noise,’’ Duda told reporters. “Nothing happened yet. I’m still a Met. You can’t concern yourself with rumors or speculations. Come here ready to play every day, and have fun.’’

Duda has 17 homers and 36 RBI despite spending three weeks on the disabled list with a hyperextended left elbow. Although Duda is currently ranked seventh on the Mets’ all-time list with 124 homers, because of injuries he never developed into the player the Mets envisioned.

Currently, the Mets envision another first baseman of their future in Dominic Smith. Although Smith is unproven, don’t expect the Mets to bring back Duda – who will make $7.25 million this year – as insurance.

Insurance will be something any team landing Asdrubal Cabrera will get. The Mets will have Cabrera taking grounders at third base not with the idea of playing him there, but the intent of enhancing his trade value.

With Neil Walker due off the disabled list next week and Amed Rosario expected to be promoted after the trade deadline, where will Cabrera play? Assuming he is not traded.

“We’ve got to start to use a little bit of the versatility that those guys bring,’’ manager Terry Collins said. “And they’re all on board with it. Like Cabby said, ‘I’ll play wherever you need me to play.’ ’’

Cabrera has played well since he was moved to second last month. At the time, Cabrera said he wanted to be traded. He also said he’d move if the Mets picked up his $8.5-million option. It wasn’t the first time he made such a demand. He chirped the same thing when the Mets contemplated moving him to third so Jose Reyes could play shortstop.

However, with the Mets fading out of playoff contention, and Cabrera reading the tea leaves about his future, he realized versatility would enhance his value in the free-agent market.

“I know he said what he said in San Francisco,’’ Collins said. “One thing we try to get him to understand is that right now, there’s probably a larger market for a third baseman than there is for a second baseman at this particular point.

“So it would behoove him to have that option. Even though he hasn’t played over there, this guy’s hands are good enough that he can play anywhere.’’

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