Mets’ Ike Davis, Lucas Duda Still Hurting

Recovery for New York Mets first basemen Ike Davis and Lucas Duda from leg injuries remain slow, with neither expected to play soon.

DAVIS: Still ailing. (AP)

DAVIS: Still ailing. (AP)

Davis hit against live pitching in an intrasquad game today, but did no running. He is dealing with tightness in both calves and said the prognosis of playing tomorrow is premature.

“The good thing is it doesn’t hurt to swing, so I can get at-bats and stuff like that,’’ Davis told reporters in Port St. Lucie. “I’ve just got to wait a little bit longer for running, so the point in my calves to the touch don’t hurt anymore.

“It’s both calves. My left one is better than my right. My right one is a little bit worse. But it’s getting better every day. Today it felt better than it did yesterday. `So hopefully in the next couple of days I’ll be able to start running. I’m trying to get as many at-bats so I don’t miss that part of it – like today. And then obviously as soon as I’m able to play, I’ll be playing a bunch.’’

Davis, who hit .205 with only nine homers last season, believes the injuries originated while lifting weights.

Davis believes it his better to miss time now than aggravate the injury further and miss more time.

As for Duda, also solid from the weight room, said he has soreness in the bottom of his left hamstring.

Duda said he’s feeling better every day, but isn’t ready to test it in a game.

ON DECK: Mets wrap

One thought on “Mets’ Ike Davis, Lucas Duda Still Hurting

  1. The Mets need to trade either Davis or Duda, and if they can’t accomplish a trade they will need to send one or both of these guys to triple AAA to work out some of their kinks since they have not been able to play in Spring Training which means they are not ready to play big league baseball either. Both of these players have been huge disappointments. The Mets screwed up by not having Wilmer Flores play winter ball where he could have practiced both SS and IB. Once again the Mets turned an opportunity into a deficit. This is very typical Mets shortsightedness.