Mets Wrap: Numbers That Add To Another Loss

There are a lot of statistics to define the 2013 New York Mets. One is 40-41, the Mets’ record in games decided by two or fewer runs. The other is 32-24, their record at Citi Field after today’s 10-inning, 4-2 loss to Milwaukee.

It was the Mets’ third straight loss by a 4-2 score after winning five of six on the road. That inconsistency is also emblematic of how the Mets have played this season.

There are two ways to interpret the first statistic. With half their games decided by two runs – they are 28-28 in one-run games – the Mets have been competitive, which is an encouraging sign.

Not so encouraging is they haven’t been good enough to take the next step over the line. The 40 victories mean they’ve played well enough to stay in the game. That they’ve been that competitive is why manager Terry Collins will reportedly be offered a two-year extension.

To be that competitive considering the season-ending losses of Matt Harvey and Bobby Parnell; the lengthy injury to David Wright; the horrific lack of production from Ike Davis, Ruben Tejada and Lucas Duda; a makeshift bullpen and outfield; Jon Niese’s off-year; and the trade of Marlon Byrd and John Buck.

All that and it is a wonder their record isn’t worse.

The 41 losses indicate breakdowns in the bullpen, defensive lapses a failure to hit in the clutch, plus all of the above.

The Mets’ home record? Well, that’s just bad baseball.

Their overall record at home has been abysmal since Citi Field, and the sad thing is this year’s staff might have been the Mets’ best, even without Johan Santana.

When the Mets opened Citi Field, they moved into a cavernous stadium a promised a team build on pitching, speed and defense. Power was a fourth priority, and yet when the Mets’ needs are mentioned it always comes down to adding a power-hitting outfielder.

However, the most telling offensive stat isn’t their 130 homers – only the traded Byrd hit more than 20 – but 1,371 strikeouts. All those strikeouts add up to over 50 games without touching the ball.

Foul balls excluded.

All those strikeouts is yet another statistic that defines this summer, the Mets’ fifth straight losing season and fifth consecutive with a drop in attendance.

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2 thoughts on “Mets Wrap: Numbers That Add To Another Loss

  1. Nice post. I think this shows that the manager is not at fault. You list important players with injuries and those who did not produce.

    What you did not cover was just how weak a team it was.

    Bobby showed he is a major league closer. We did not know that in the offseason. We brought in the usual suspects for the pen. The pen turned out quite good.

    Starting pitching. We had Niese and Harvey. No one knew Harvey would be this good. Nor gee. Gee and Hefner were our 3 and 4 and no one cared. We signed a broken veteran who just wasted $6m or whatever. He never really pitched for us. And wheeler showed he can pitch
    Then there was the horrible outfield. Duda was a starter even though he had yet to prove he can play outfield let alone hit. And we had a bunch of other garbage out there. Byrd turned out to be gold and we flipped him for a minor league second baseman.

    So yes the coach was given nothing to work with and the record in close games is quite good if taken in context.