Mets’ Ike Davis Showing Breakthrough Signs

One of the hidden storylines for the New York Mets Saturday was Ike Davis’ batting average breaking .200 heading north.

The Mets stuck with Davis longer than they should have before demoting him July 9, but it was because a slow 2012 first half culminated with a late surge that saw him finish with 32 homers, and that’s production GM Sandy Alderson couldn’t ignore.

DAVIS: Scoring last night vs. D-Backs. (Getty)

DAVIS: Scoring last night vs. D-Backs. (Getty)

“He showed what he is capable of last year in the second half,’’ Alderson said in the weeks prior to the demotion in explaining why Davis was still taking his three empty swings and heading back to the dugout. “We have to keep that in the back of our mind.’’

Davis had two hits against Arizona to raise his average to .203, but also drew two walks. Not enough to warrant a contract extension, but consider Davis is hitting .300 since returning from Triple-A Las Vegas compared to .161 before the desert and you can see the difference.

Davis’ pre-Vegas strikeouts-to-walks ratio was 66-to-19; it is now, brace yourself, 22-to-25. He’s still not hitting for power with one homer and nine RBI, but first things first. His patience and pitch selection is far better, and if it continues, the run production will increase.

Davis has not done enough to warrant the Mets’ tendering him a contract this winter, but a strong finish would give Alderson reason to think, instead of looking at Josh Satin or Wilmer Flores or somebody in the free-agent market.

The Mets claim they’ll have more resources this winter, but they still are a franchise feeling financial strain. They aren’t about to throw money away, and that would include bringing back Davis at his current run-production.

Davis is making $3.1 million this season, which is chump change for a 30-homer bat. He has six homers and 25 RBI, which isn’t enough to keep him, but 15 homers and 50 RBI is definitely doable. That could change everything.

Currently working against him is a horrid first half that has him in a platoon with Satin, and with David Wright on the disabled list, pitchers can work around Davis.

As far as next year, Satin will be cheaper, but he doesn’t have Davis’ power. Perhaps he’s a right-handed Daniel Murphy at best.

Power is not expected from Satin and irrelevant now from Davis, what matters is having an idea and a light has switched on above his head.

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

7 thoughts on “Mets’ Ike Davis Showing Breakthrough Signs

  1. Ike Davis’ is running out of time. Sure his plate discipline has been 100% better since his recall from Vegas but the Mets need to see much more from him in terms of power. First base is one of those power positions that are essential for a contending team and before the season ends Sandy needs to see what he has in Davis. This is no easy task, considering Davis has been at best a second half player the last two seasons. If Sandy doesn’t feel comfortable giving Davis another chance in 2014, then I would give Wilmer Flores a shot at first base next year. Satin it seems to me is not a long term answer. His hits are becoming less frequent and it seems the league has caught up to him. So Sandy’s job has just increased his question marks as to what to do to bring this team to the next level in 2014. Hopefully Davis can make it easier for him one way or the other. My hope is that Davis can produce as he did last year in the second half and lighten Sandy’s load as to what needs to be done to bring the Mets further along in their growth.

  2. He should be tendered a contract. Even before his improved hitting, non-tendering him would be extreme. A big contract extension, however, is not necessary. He has yet to even put together a good full season.

  3. IT,S ABOUT TIME FOR IKE DAVIS. THE METS G M IS NOT DOING A GOOD JOB HE DOESN,T GET GOOD PLAYERS TO REPLACE THE JUNK.

  4. I need to eat my words regarding Ike.

    Since his promotion he has been playing better. I believe he is hitting about 260 since that time. However I still do not trust him. I am confused now as he seems to be good enough to want to keep, but not that good that you would not consider trading him or cutting him.

    I liked what I saw of Satin and like what I see of Flores. Of course we need to see more of them to determine if they really belong and Ike is a MLB player and they are not.

    Decisions. Decisions..

  5. Ike Davis presents a true gamble next year (assuming he and the Mets can come to terms over the winter and not go to arbitration) with either great productivity or another great collapse. With Ike there doesn’t seem to be any mid-ground, and if his salary, via arbitration, should threaten to become substantially larger than his productivity, it is likely the Mets will release him. The alternative doesn’t lie in Josh Satin, but in Wilmer Flores. If he is the hitter his minor league record indicates, and his limited time in the majors suggests, he becomes a keeper. Murphy goes to first base and Flores to second. I have watched quite a few minor league games on the computer and while Flores lacks a gold glove he is, at this point, much better than Murphy was when he made the transition. Does he need work? Yes! But, I believe there is more certainty in this move than there is in bringing back Davis. As regards the long ball, and first base being a power position, etc. Keith Hernandez and John Olerude. are two former first baseman that come to mind, neither considered Home Run Hitters.

    • Bob Fila: Thanks for your comment. I just can’t see the Mets giving Davis a chance at arbitration. The way to avoid that would be to sign him to a one-year deal now. Don’t see the Mets doing that.-JD

    • With regards to First Base and power, the two players you mention were exceptional defensive players. Both had decent power ( good doubles hitters and 300 bat ). Neither Murphy or Flores is considered a gold glove fielder at any position. Their value lies with the bat. And neither are power hitters.

      But I agree. THe limited view we have of Flores makes him interesting. Although at this point I value Dan’s bat over his just because he has proved he belongs and Flores has not..yet.